Skip Navigation
UT wordmark
College of Liberal Arts wordmark
history masthead
Jacqueline Jones, Chair 128 Inner Campus Dr., Stop B7000, GAR 1.104 Austin, TX 78712-1739 • 512-471-3261

Virginia Garrard-Burnett

Professor Ph.D., Tulane University

Professor and Associate Chair
Virginia Garrard-Burnett

Contact

  • Phone: 512-475-7822
  • Office: GAR 2.204
  • Office Hours: Spring 2014: W 2-4 p.m.
  • Campus Mail Code: B7000

Biography

Virginia Garrard-Burnett received her Ph.D in History from Tulane University and has been on the faculty at the University of Texas since 1990. She is author of Terror in the Land of the Holy Spirit: Guatemala Under General Efraín Ríos Montt, 1982-1983 (Oxford, 2010); Terror en la tierra del Espiritu Santo (Guatemala: AVANCSO, 2012); Viviendo en La Nueva Jerusalem (Guatemala: Editorial Piedra Santa, 2009), Protestantism in Guatemala: Living in the New Jerusalem (University of Texas Press, 1998). She is co-editor, along with Mark Lawrence and Julio Moreno of Beyond the Eagle's Shadow: New Histories of Latin America's Cold War (University of New Mexico Press, 2013). She has also edited On Earth as it is in Heaven: Religion and Society in Latin America (Scholarly Resources, 2000) and co-edited with David Stoll, Rethinking Protestantism in Latin America (Temple, 1993). Currently, she and Paul Freston are co-editing the three-volume Cambridge History of Religion in Latin America. She is also co-author, with Peter Henderson and Bryan McCann, of the forthcoming History of Modern Latin America (Oxford University Press).

Research interests

Her research interests include: historic memory and human rights during the Cold War in Latin America, archives and history, and contemporary Central American history. She is equally interested in religious movements and ethnic identity in Latin America, Pentecostalism and other Protestant movements, and the intersection of religion and politics in Latin America.

HIS 346L • Modern Latin America

39580 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.306
(also listed as AFR 374E, LAS 366 )
show description

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the period of the Wars for Independence in the early nineteenth century until the present. While the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the region as a whole, due to time constraints it will focus primarily on the histories of select countries, including Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, and Colombia. Drawing upon primary documents, audio/visual materials, and works produced by historians, the class will explore the racial, class, and gender hierarchies that emerged out of the region’s colonial and precolonial past and their impact on the lives of Latin American people. We will explore the struggle to create “nations” and the emergence of a neocolonial order in the nineteenth century. We will also examine the ways that popular mobilization against neocolonial social hierarchies led to the refashioning of the “nation” throughout the twentieth century. The course will conclude with an examination of the ways Latin Americans are navigating the increasingly transnational world of the early twenty-first century. Thus, the arc of the class prompts students to think about the history of the Americas as a history of transnational processes.

Course Objectives:

(1) Enable students to develop a working knowledge of the key social, political, economic, and cultural developments in Latin American history since the Wars for Independence.

(2) Expose students to the complex relationship between local level developments and transnational processes across time and space.

(3) Encourage students to interrogate nationalism as a historical phenomenon, rather than a transhistorical given that stands outside of history

Texts:

John Chasteen, Born in Blood and Fire

José Vasconcelos, La Raza Cósmica/The Cosmic Race

C. Peter Ripley, Conversations with Cuba

Coursepack Readings

Grading:

First two tests at 25% each 50%

Final Exam 30%

Active Class participation 20%

HIS 386L • Hist Of Socty In Mod Cent Amer

40255 • Spring 2014
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 2.124
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

This seminar will focus on the social and political history of the five nations of Central America in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will read the historiography that examines critical issues such as: the emergence of agrarian republics, the challenges of state formation in the 19th century, the influence and intervention of the “great powers” (Great Britain, the United States, and transnational corporations), the historical impact of natural disasters, the emergence of a “banana frontier,” the development of active and passive protest movements, and the Cold War in Central America. We will frame much of our discussion around how these themes are affected by and affect questions of race, class and identity. Finally, we will look at questions relating to long-term violence and historical memory, and how they impact and influence our understanding of a nation’s recent traumatic past.

 

Grading

 

Weekly readings and discussion. Two in-depth presentations to class on readings.

 

 25  research paper, based largely on primary sources.

HIS 350L • Religious Traditn In Lat Amer

39840 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as LAS 366, R S 368 )
show description

This course will seek to identify the different ways in which religion has helped to define the political, social and philosophical structures of Latin America from colonial times to the present.  Readings and discussion will focus on the historical influence of the institutional Roman Catholic church on Latin American society.  The course will also explore the role that folk religion--from cofradias to millennialist movements--has played in the Latin American experience. Finally, the course will examine important changes in traditional Latin American religiosity in the twentieth century, including the impact of Liberation Theology and the growing influence of non-Catholic religious sectors.

Texts:

Virginia Garrard-Burnett, On Earth As It Is in Heaven: Religion and Society in

Latin America (Rowen and Littlefield, 2000)

Supplemental reader

Grading:

Grades for this course will be based on students’ participation in class discussions based on readings and on the satisfactory completion of the following written assignments:

3 essays based on readings and discussion, 3-5 pages each in length

1 research paper of between 15-20 pages.  Students will submit outlines, drafts, and rewrites of the term paper.

Final grade:

25%: essays

75%: research paper

HIS 386L • Gua His Thru Natnl Pol Archive

39845 • Spring 2013
Meets W 900am-1200pm GAR 1.122
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

This course will explore the modern Guatemalan history through the lens of the Historical Archives of the National Police (AHPN). The main focus of the course will be on Guatemalan history between 1954-1996, between the CIA-sponsored overthrow of President Jacobo Arbenz and the end of that nation’s 36-year long armed conflict. Students may, however, use the AHPN to explore earlier topics, such as the medical experiments that took place in the 1940s or police relations with the public going back as far as the Archive’s beginnings, in the late 19th century. Students will produce a significant research paper based on materials that they locate in the AHPN.  In addition, students in the course will help to “crowd source” the AHPN by tracking their research through this newly-acquired resource.

Course stucture: During the first half of the semester, students will meet and discuss the major historiographical works of recent Guatemalan history in order to a proper understanding for the context for their research. During the second, they will work closely with AHPN documents and develop their research projects.

Texts: Students will be provided with an extensive bibliography of Guatemalan historiography from which to choose their readings for this course.

Grading criteria:

In-class participation (including presentations on historical readings): 25%

Development of crowd sourcing materials for AHPN: 10%

Successful research and completion of a paper based on primary documents: 65%

Grades will utilize the plus (+) and minus (-) system.

HIS 386K • Appro To Study Relig Lat Amer

39715 • Fall 2012
Meets W 900am-1200pm CBA 4.346
(also listed as LAS 386, R S 391L )
show description

This course will offer a broad exploration of the main literature and theories that pertain to religion in Latin America. The course will take a historical, chronological approach, examining topics such as indigenous religions before Contact, the “Spiritual conquest” of the Americas, the hybridization of religious experience in the Americas, and the religious dimensions of the African diaspora. It will also explore and theorize the historical and modern religious transnationalism, from pilgrimage to shrines to missionaries and international televangelism.  Finally, it will interrogate the interaction between religion and (post) modernity in Latin America and the Caribbean. 

Text: Students will receive an extensive bibliography from which they will select the books to be discussed in this course.

Grading criteria: Grades will be based on 1) in-class formal presentations based on readings 2) informal but highly integrated participation in class discussions, 4) peer reviews and discussion groups and 4) the successful completion of a publication-quality research or historiographical paper.  

Grading policy

Class participation (including in-class presentations on readings): 25%

Group projects and peer reviews: 20%

Research paper: 60%

Class grades will employ the plus (+) minus (-) system.

HIS 363K • Religion In Guatemala-Gua

39502 • Fall 2011
Meets
(also listed as LAS 366, LAS 366, R S 368 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

HIS 350L • Religious Traditn In Lat Amer

39665 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.202
(also listed as LAS 366, R S 368 )
show description

350L

DESCRIPTION:

 This course will seek to identify the different ways in which religion has helped to define the political, social and philosophical structures of Latin America from colonial times to the present.  Readings and discussion will focus on the historical influence of the institutional Roman Catholic church on Latin American society.  The course will also explore the role that folk religion--from cofradias to millennialist movements--has played in the Latin American experience. Finally, the course will examine important changes in traditional Latin American religiosity in the twentieth century, including the impact of Liberation Theology and the growing influence of non-Catholic religious sectors.

 

GRADING:

Grades for this course will be based on students’ participation in class discussions based on readings and on the satisfactory completion of the following written assignments:

3 essays based on readings and discussion, 3-5 pages each in length

1 research paper of between 15-20 pages.  Students will submit outlines, drafts, and rewrites of the term paper.

Final grade:

25%: essays

75: research paper

 

 

HIS 306N • Key Ideas And Iss In Lat Amer

39015 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am UTC 3.102
(also listed as LAS 301 )
show description

LAS 301 #40080History 306N #39015                                                                        Dr. Virginia Garrard BurnettKey Ideas and Issues in Latin America                                                TAs: Samantha Serrano                                                                                                         Samuel Frazier           Fall 2010, T-Th 9:30-11

                                                Syllabus

Course Description:

What is Latin America?  The large area we refer to as “Latin America” is not unified by a single language, history, religion, or type of government.  Nor is it unified by a shared geography or by the prevalence of a common ethnic group.  Yet Latin America does, obviously, exist.  It is a region forged from the merging of diverse cultures and historical experiences.  In this course, we will explore the ways that various competing groups have “created” Latin America by introducing the ideas, issues, and values that define the region.

Learning Objectives:

Part I:

The first third of this course will explore the cultural context of the “discovery” and conquest of Spanish and Portuguese America.  We will examine in detail the ways in which European, African, and native America ways of life blended and clashed to form Latin American society.

Part II:

The second portion of the course will deal with some of the themes of Latin America’s quest for identity and nationhood during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It will focus on such issues as civil war, social banditry, ethnic relations, and Latin America’s relationship with the industrial powers.

Part III:

The final third of the course will examine some specific trends and prevalent ideas in Latin America during the twentieth century, including revolution, military rule, population growth, and the relationship between development and the environment. We will also examine the “erasure” of national boundaries, as Latin and North America converge through immigration and globalization.

Course Requirements:

This course consists of reading, lectures, discussion, and multimedia presentations.  Please have the assigned reading done before you come to class. Our class meetings will consist of discussions on the lectures, the readings, and the visual material. Please be aware that discussion and multimedia presentations are not optional or “filler”; they make up an integral part of the course.  Because of this, it is imperative that you attend each class. 

Final grades will be calculated as follows:            Midterm:                                                    40%            Final exam:                                                 40%            Movie critiques:                                           10%            Attendance, study sessions,/journal:             10%

 

Final grades for this course will employ the new plus/minus system.  For more on this new policy, go to: www.utexas.edu/provost/planning/plus-minus

Discussion sessions:A discussion group for this course will meet for one hour each week at a time and location to be determined by the TA.  Participation in the discussion group is not mandatory, but it is highly recommended. Students who attend at least 3 study sessions are exempt from doing the journal project.

Language Component:This course is offered as an optional language component course.  This means that the some of the assigned texts  and supplemental readings are available in either Spanish or English or, in at least one case, Portuguese.  In addition, the discussion group for this class will be conducted in English and Spanish on alternate weeks.  The ability to read or speak Spanish is not required for this course, so participation in the language component is entirely optional.  Tests will be given and must be answered in English.  However, movie critiques and extra credit projects can be submitted in Spanish or Portuguese if you prefer.

Class Policies:Please be on time and attend every class. If there us an urgent reason that you must be absent, please let one of the TA know by email and be sure to get the notes you missed from another student. I do not post my notes on Blackboard.

This class is a technology blackout zone!  Please turn off all electronics, especially cell phones and I-Pods, before coming to class.  PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR WI-FI and use your computer only for taking notes during our class!  No Facebook, no email, no Web browsing, no reruns of last night’s It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, nothing! Seriously. TAs will be monitoring and will ask you to shut down your computer if necessary.

Academic Honesty:Anyone who turns in work that is not his or her own—the person who is claiming authorship—(l.e., downloaded off the Internet, plagiarized, borrowed from a friend, written by you but for a different class) will receive an F for this course, punto. Intellectual honesty is a minimum requirement for this course!

Email: garrard@mail.utexas.edu (best method, but please be advised, I’m not available 24/7. I also try to stay away from my email over weekends)TA emails: samljgs@hotmail.com, sfrazier@mail.utexas.eduTA office hours: TBA

Reading AssignmentsCourse packet available at I. T Copy.García Marquez, Gabriel. One Hundred Years of Solitude (1979)English, TJ. Havana Nocturne: How the Mob Owned Cuba and then Lost it to the Revolution (2008).

This course contains a Global Culture flag.

HIS 350L • Hist Of Mod Central Amer-W

39695 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm WAG 308
show description

LAS 366 #40600                                                            Dr. Virginia Garrard Burnett
History 350L #39695                                                      Spring 2010
History of Modern Central America                                   

SYLLABUS

Course Description:
This course will chronicle the history of Central America from the independence period to the present day.  The class will focus on the Liberal-Conservative political polemic during the nineteenth century.  It will examine the economic and political relationships that evolved between these nations and the foreign industrial powers, particularly the United States at the beginning of this century.  Moving forward, we will explore the social and political turmoil that characterized the region during the last decades of the twentieth century, interrogating the “Central American crisis” of the late 1970s and 1980s through the interpretive lenses of the Cold War and also of local resistance. Finally, this course will examine the “paradox of peace”—the rebuilding of civil society in Central America and issues of historic memory in the post-war period.

Learning Objectives:
Part I: Explores the formative political ideologies and economic and social structures that evolved during the Central American nations’ quests for nationhood during the nineteenth century.

Part II: Deals with the Anglo-American rivalry on the isthmus and the emergence of the American economic and political hegemony in Central American during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Part III: Examines Central America’s social and political revolutions that took place during the second half of the twentieth century. Here, we will explore the impact of the Cold War on Central America, and the paradox of peace in the early 21st century.

 Grade Assessment:
           Final grades are based on the following:
                                    Reviews and projects: 30%
                                    Research paper:  60%
                                    Participation:    10%

 The grade for the research paper will be based not only on the successful completion of a polished research paper, but upon your turning in the preliminary materials, such as bibliography, outline, and first draft for us to go over together before the final paper is due. The participation grade is based on showing up, doing the readings, and taking part in discussion.

Assignments are due at the beginning of class. Late assignments lose one letter grade per day.

Extra Credit:

Students can earn up to three points toward the final grade by attending and writing up a short synopsis of the event (lecture, conference, exhibit, performance, film, etc.) that has something to do with Central America over the course of the semester. Many such events are listed on the LLILAS calendar found at http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/llilas/events/  All extra credit materials are due on or before April 30.

Class policies:
Class meetings will be a lecture and discussion format.  Please read your assigned materials in advance so that you can take part in class discussion. It is critical that you attend every class meeting! In the final weeks of class, each student and I will meet independently to discuss the progress of the individual papers.

Please do your best to be on time to every class.  If you must habitually be late or leave a little early to make it to another class across campus, do try to come and go as inconspicuously as possible.

Electronic issues:
Please mute your cell phones and turn off your WIFI during class!

Academic honesty:

Plagiarism (turning in any work that is not your own, whether it is copied from a book or a friend or taken off the Internet) and cheating is a capital offense in this course. Don’t even think about downloading an assignment to turn in for this class. Dishonest work will result in an F for the semester. A separate handout that outlines university policy about cheating is available on request.  Consider yourself warned! 

Getting in touch with me:
Email
: garrard@mail.utexas.edu (best form of contact)
Office hours:
Wednesday 1:30-3:30 Garrison 2.224 and TBA
Office phone: 475-7822

 

Assigned texts:
Woodward, R.L.  Central America: A Nation Divided, 3rd ed. (Oxford, 1999).

Please bring a notebook to keep track of the (many) primary-source readings we will go over in class.

HIS 386L • Hist Of Socty In Mod Cent Amer

39985 • Spring 2010
Meets T 200pm-500pm GAR 1.134
(also listed as LAS 386 )
show description

Research Seminar in Latin American History. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese, and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 306N • Key Ideas & Iss In Lat Amer

39606 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 WAG 214
show description

History 306N #39606                                                                        Dr. Virginia Garrard BurnettKey Ideas and Issues in Latin America                                                TA: Zac Brown          

Fall 2009, T-Th 9:30-11                                                Syllabus 

Course Description:

 What is Latin America?  The large area we refer to as “Latin America” is not unified by a single language, history, religion, or type of government.  Nor is it unified by a shared geography or by the prevalence of a common ethnic group.  Yet Latin America does, obviously, exist.  It is a region forged from the merging of diverse cultures and historical experiences.  In this course, we will explore the ways that various competing groups have “created” Latin America by introducing the ideas, issues, and values that define the region. 

Learning Objectives:

Part I:The first third of this course will explore the cultural context of the “discovery” and conquest of Spanish and Portuguese America.  We will examine in detail the ways in which European, African, and native America ways of life blended and clashed to form Latin American society. Part II:The second portion of the course will deal with some of the themes of Latin America’s quest for identity and nationhood during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  It will focus on such issues as civil war, social banditry, ethnic relations, and Latin America’s relationship with the industrial powers. Part III:The final third of the course will examine some specific trends and prevalent ideas in Latin America during the twentieth century, including revolution, military rule, population growth, and the relationship between development and the environment. We will also examine the “erasure” of national boundaries, as Latin and North America converge through immigration and globalization.

Course Requirements:

This course consists of reading, lectures, discussion, and multimedia presentations.  Please have the assigned reading done before you come to class. Our class meetings will consist of discussions on the lectures, the readings, and the visual material. Please be aware that discussion and multimedia presentations are not optional or “filler”; they make up an integral part of the course.  Because of this, it is imperative that you attend each class.  Final grades will be calculated as follows:           

Midterm:                                                    40%           

Final exam:                                                 40%           

Movie critiques:                                           10%           

Attendance, study sessions,/journal:             10% 

Final grades for this course will employ the new plus/minus system. 

For more on this new policy, go to: http://www.utexas.edu/cola/student-affairs/news/1876 

Discussion sessions:A discussion group for this course will meet for one hour each week at a time and location to be determined by the TA.  Participation in the discussion group is not mandatory, but it is highly recommended. Students who attend at least 3 study sessions are exempt from doing the journal project. 

Class Policies:Please be on time and attend every class. If there us an urgent reason that you must be absent, please let me or the TA know by email and be sure to get the notes you missed from another student. I do not post my notes on Blackboard. Stay home if you have swine flu! 

This class is a technology blackout zone!  Please turn off all electronics, especially cell phones and I-Pods, before coming to class.  PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR WI-FI and use your computer only for taking notes during our class!  No Facebook, no World of Warcraft, no email, no Web browsing, no reruns of last night’s House, nothing! Seriously.          

Academic Honesty:Anyone who turns in work that is not his or her own—the person who is claiming authorship—(l.e., downloaded off the Internet, plagiarized, borrowed from a friend, written by you but for a different class) will receive an F for this course, punto. Intellectual honesty is a minimum requirement for this course! Email: garrard@mail.utexas.edu (best method, but please be advised, I’m not available 24/7)TA email: zacharyzbrown@gmail.com                                                     

 

HIS 346L • Modern Latin America

39970 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 WAG 214
show description

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the period of the Wars for Independence in the early nineteenth century until the present. While the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the region as a whole, due to time constraints it will focus primarily on the histories of select countries, including Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, and Colombia. Drawing upon primary documents, audio/visual materials, and works produced by historians, the class will explore the racial, class, and gender hierarchies that emerged out of the region’s colonial and precolonial past and their impact on the lives of Latin American people. We will explore the struggle to create “nations” and the emergence of a neocolonial order in the nineteenth century. We will also examine the ways that popular mobilization against neocolonial social hierarchies led to the refashioning of the “nation” throughout the twentieth century. The course will conclude with an examination of the ways Latin Americans are navigating the increasingly transnational world of the early twenty-first century. Thus, the arc of the class prompts students to think about the history of the Americas as a history of transnational processes. 

Course Objectives:

(1) Enable students to develop a working knowledge of the key social, political, economic, and cultural developments in Latin American history since the Wars for Independence.

(2) Expose students to the complex relationship between local level developments and transnational processes across time and space.

(3) Encourage students to interrogate nationalism as a historical phenomenon, rather than a transhistorical given that stands outside of history

 

Required Readings:

John Chasteen, Born in Blood and Fire

José Vasconcelos, La Raza Cósmica/The Cosmic Race

C. Peter Ripley, Conversations with Cuba

Coursepack Readings

 

Grading

The breakdown of your grade is as follows: 

First two tests at 25% each 50%

Final Exam 30%

Active Class participation 20%

 

HIS 386L • Religion & Socty In Latin Amer

40310 • Fall 2009
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SRH 1.320
(also listed as LAS 386, R S 383 )
show description

Research Seminar in Latin American History. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese, and consent of the graduate adviser.

HIS 350L • Relig Traditn In Latin Amer-W

39145 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 GAR 0.120
(also listed as LAS 366, R S 368 )
show description

Lectures, discussion, reading, and research on selected topics in the field of history.

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Designed for History majors. 

History 350L and 350R may not both be counted unless the topics vary.

Course carries Writing flag. 

HIS 363K • Cold War In Latin America-W

39260 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 1000-1100 CBA 4.332
(also listed as LAS 366 )
show description

May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

 

Publications

Books

  • Terror in the Land of the Holy Spirit:  Guatemala Under General Efrain Rios Montt, 1982-1983.  Oxford University Press, 2010.
  • El protestantismo en Guatemala:  Viviendo en la Nueva Jerusalén.  Guatemala:  Editorial Piedra Santa, 2009.
  • Editor.  On Earth as it is in Heaven:  Religion in Latin America.  Wilmington Delaware:  Scholarly Resources, 2000.
  • A History of Protestants in Guatemala:  Living in the New Jerusalem.  Austin: University of Texas Press, 1998.
  • Co-editor with David Stoll .  Rethinking Protestantism in Latin America.  Philadelphia:  Temple University Press, 1993.
  • Co-editor with James Olson.  An Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Empire.  Westport CT:  Greenwood Press, 1992.

Articles

  • "Stop Suffering? The Ireja Universal do Reino de Deus in the United States."  In Conversion of a Continent:  Contemporary Religious Change in Latin America, edited by Timothy Steigenga and Edward Cleary.  Rutgers University Press, 2007.
  • Co-authored with Carlos Garma Navarro.  "Protestantism(s) and Mayan Worldviews in Chiapas and Guatemala in the Context of Civil Violence."  Social Sciences and Missions 20 (2007).
  • "God Was Already Here: Mayan Inculturated Theology."  In Resurgent Voices in Latin America: Indigenous Peoples, Political Moblization and Religious Change, edited by Timothy Steigenga and Edward Cleary.  Rutgers University Press, 2004.
  • "Mayan Theologies and De-Westernized Christianity."  In Christianity and Native Cultures, edited by Kavita A. Pullapilly, Bernard J. Donahoe, David Stefancic, and William Svelmoe.  Cross Cultural Publications, 2004.
  • "The Third Church in Latin America:  Religion and Globalization in Contemporary Latin America."  Latin American Research Review 39 (2004).
  • "Charismatic Catholicism Meets Liberation Theology in El Salvador."  Journal of Hispanic and Latino Theology (2004).
  • "Popular Religion in Latin America:  A Review of Recent Literature."  Latin American Research Review (2004).
  • "Inculturated Protestant Theology in Guatemala."  In Christianity and Other Religions:  A Dialogue, edited by Viggo Mortensen.  Aarhus:  University of Aarhus, Denmark, 2003 and Grand Rapids:  William Eerdmans Publishing, 2003.
  • "Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus: do Rios para o mundo."  In Oro Les nouveaux conquérants de la foi:  L’Église universelle du royanume de Dieu (Brésil), edited by André Corten, Jean-Peirre Dozon and Ari Pedro.  Paris: Karthala, 2003.
  • "A igreja universal nos Estados Unidos."  In Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus:  os novos conquistadors da fé, edited by Ari Pedro Oro, André Corten, and Jean-Pierre Dozon.  São Paulo: Paulinas, 2003.
  • "The Impact of Violence on Gender."  In Women and Civil War:  Impact, Organizations, and Actors, edited by Krishna Kumar.  Boulder: Lynn Reiner, 2001.
  • "Religion in Practice:  Testimonies of Maya and Ladino Protestants in Contemporary Guatemala."  In Religion in Practice in Latin America, edited by Gustavo Benevides.  Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.
  • "Indians are Drunks and Drunks are Indians:  Alcohol and Indigenismo in Guatemala, 1890-1940."  Bulletin of Latin American Research 19 (2000).
  • "'Greek to the Greeks and Maya to the Maya':  Protestantism and Ethnic Identity Among the Maya in Guatemala and Chiapas."  Ibero-Amerikanisches Archiv:  Zeitschrift für Sozialwissenschaften und Geschichte (1999).
  • "'Like a Mighty Rushing Wind',  The Growth of Protestantism in Contemporary Latin America."  Religion and Latin America in the Twenty First Century:  Libraries Reacting to Social Change (1997).
  • "Order, Progress and Missions in Liberal Guatemala."  Latin American Perspectives 93 (1997).
  • "The Resacramentalization of the Profane:  Government, Religion and Ethnicity in Modern Guatemala."  In Questioning the Secular State:  The Worldwide Resurgence of Religion in Politics, edited by David Westerlund.  London: Hurst and Co., 1996.
  • "El protestantismo en Guatemala."  In La historia general de Guatemala, Fundación para la Cultura y Desarrollo.  Guatemala:  1995.
  • "God and Revolution:  Protestant Missions in Revolutionary Guatemala."  In Molding the Hearts and Minds:  Education, Communications, and Social Change in Latin America, edited by John A. Britton.  Wilmington:  Scholarly Resources, 1994.
  • "Protestantism in Latin America:  A Review of Recent Literature."  Latin American Research Review (1992).
  • "El protestantismo, liberalismo, e impulso misionero:  misiones evangélicas en Guatemala, 1880-1920."  Mesoamerica 19 (1990).
  • "Dios y revolución:  el protestantismo en la época revolucionaria."  Anales de la Academia de Historia e Geografia de Guatemala (1990).
  • "Protestantism in Revolutionary Guatemala, 1944-1954."  The Americas 46 (1989).
  • "Protestantism in Rural Guatemala, 1872-1954."  Latin American Research Review 24 (1989).
  • "Onward Christian Soldiers:  Protestant Nationalism in Guatemala.”  SECOLAS Annals 19 (1988).
bottom border