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Anthony C. Woodbury, Chair CLA 4.304, Mailcode B5100, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-1701

Ian Hancock

Professor Ph.D., London University

Harold C. and Alice T. Nowlin Regents Professor in Liberal Arts
Ian Hancock

Contact

  • Phone: 232-7684
  • Office: CAL 420
  • Office Hours: Tuesday/Thursday 7:30 - 8:30 and 9:30 - 10:45
  • Campus Mail Code: B5100

Biography

Introduction from

Dileep Karanth (ed.) Danger! Educated Gypsy: Selected Essays by Ian Hancock

Foreword

My teacher, Professor Ian F. Hancock, is an unusual man:unusual in his background, in the breadth of his interests and in the range of his accomplishments. He was the first Gypsy to be awarded a doctorate in the UK; he is perhaps the only person to hold three doctorates without having finished high school. His book The Pariah Syndrome – the first to document the enslavement of Roma in Europe – came as a revelation to those who were accustomed to think of slavery as an institution restricted in modern times only to Europe’ colonies. Another of his books, We Are the Romani People, also the first of its kind, has become an authoritative source for teachers who wish to present the Romani self-statement to their students. Author of over 350 publications, esteemed teacher to generations of students and tireless spokesman for the Romani peoples of the world, Ian has achieved much fame and even some notoriety in his eventful lifetime.

This collection of select writings is an attempt to introduce this dangerously educated and educating man through the medium of his work. Within its covers you will find poetry and song, stories and scholarship, bitter criticisms and friendly advice. The characters that speak through the pages of this book include scholars and ‘concocters’, oppressors and victims, promoters of equality and racial supremacists. Some characters, such as the seductive Gypsy woman of lore, turn out to be entirely imaginary upon closer examination. Others, such as a racist police officer, turn out to be all too real.

            The book is inaugurated by Djabravoki, in which Ian brings his translator’s craftsmanship to bear on the famous poem by Lewis Carroll. This is followed by an introduction to his family, which he narrates in the first person. Raconteur then turns rebel (although his ‘vorpal sword’ is his pen) in one of his earliest essays from the 1960s, giving us a taste of his still-forming rhetoric, a rhetoric clearly influenced by the emerging Black Power movement to which he was exposed as a student in London.

            In the next section, Ian dons the cloak of linguist and historian and clarifies the Indian connections of the Roma, explaining how an Asiatic people came to be transplanted into Europe. His vast knowledge of the Romani languages gives him a vantage point from which to make useful suggestions for its standardisation. Speaking as an academic and educator, Ian shares his unique insights into the problems confronting the Roma in their quest for formal education. Then, embracing the role of social commentator, he rehabilitates the true image of his people, by rescuing Romani reality from the encroachment of the fictional ‘Gypsy’ stereotype.

In the last section, as advocate and human rights activist, Ian draws attention to the many impediments the Roma have endured over the centuries, especially during the Porrajmos (Holocaust) in the twentieth century and takes their case to the courts of justice to which they have long been denied access. Finally, as a watchful elder and shepherd of his people, he ends with a piece of sobering advice for the Roma: to live with dignity, to promote harmony and to discourage fractious tendencies among the various Romani groups.

            In some of these writings, an undercurrent of anger and frustration is apparent. Anger at the sense of entitlement academics and others assume in studying, manipulating, defining and thinking for his people; frustration that Roma lack the adequate means to address this, while remaining victims of the stubborn and one-sided representation perpetrated by the all-controlling media. But the anger and frustration are channeled and sublimated and pour themselves finally into a message of accommodation, reconciliation and hope.

            Ian’s life story is anything but ordinary. Born into a British and Hungarian Romani family in London, he went with them to live in Canada for four of his teenage years and returned to England by himself at the age of nineteen. While in Canada he attended school briefly, but found his effort to ‘fit in’ an unrewarding experience. One teacher in particular, a Mr Tippett, told Ian that he was wasting his time getting an education and that he would never amount to anything. Mr Tippett would say this often and before the whole class, and Ian left after less than a year. But the stinging words lingered, and he told me that they motivated him fiercely to prove the man wrong. After his stint at school he found various jobs in Canada – in an automotive supply store, as a darkroom assistant on a daily newspaper, as a pin-setter in a bowling alley and as a Ferris wheel assembler, all the while saving his money to return to Britain. Back in London, he found jobs in the factories along the Great West Road as a plastic garment cutter, a windscreen-wiper packer and a spray painter. Later, he worked for the late Joe Meek as a road manager for a prominent band called the Outlaws. One of his jobs was working for an antiquarian bookseller called Luzac, opposite the British Museum. The shop specialised in secondhand language books, and Ian used his lunch breaks to go through the stock and learn what he could about philology.

            The house in which he rented a room was also home to a number of students from Sierra Leone, and he spent many evenings in their company, getting to know them and their unwritten language, Krio. The Sierra Leonean community was large in that part of the city, and very supportive of his attempts to commit Krio to paper. Egged on to publish his efforts, Ian sought the advice of the Sierra Leonean writer Eldred Jones, then a visiting scholar at the University of Leeds. In turn Jones put him in touch with the editor of The Sierra Leone Language Review, Dr David Dalby, who was based at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) at the University of London. Dalby was impressed and asked to hold onto the notes that he’d brought along so that he could show them to the head of the college.

            When Ian went back a second time, Dalby asked him to consider enrolling as a student at the University of London, a proposition which seemed so unreal that it angered Ian at the time, given his limited educational history prior to that. This was at a juncture when entry to a British university was still the preserve of the privileged and not considered suitable for school ‘dropouts’. Dalby explained his thinking, however: in the absence of any formal linguistic training Ian had produced an impressive body of research, this despite the fact that he had never actually visited Sierra Leone. Dalby assured Ian that the University considered him capable of great things if given the opportunity.

            On account of his Romani background, Ian qualified for a short-lived experimental affirmative action programme created by Prime Minister Harold Wilson. Wilson’s socialist government wanted to make higher education available for minorities and other ‘special case’ individuals and Ian, and just one other person (the late Abdul Karim Turay, who went on to become Sierra Leone’s Minister for External Affairs) were selected. Ian’s tuition was paid for and he was given a small amount of money to purchase books, although throughout his time at SOAS he continued to hold a variety of jobs to support himself.

            Two other people also attended SOAS whose work later had an impact upon Ian’s academic development: Lorenzo Dow Turner, who wrote a seminal book on African elements in the Gullah Creole spoken on the south-eastern coast of the US, and Ian’s contemporary the late Walter Rodney, who reshaped current understanding of the first fifteenth century European contacts with Africans on the Guinea Coast. Ian readily attributes his ‘domestic hypothesis’ of Creole origins to Rodney’s work, and in 1976 Ian also discovered and later described an archaic variety of Gullah that is spoken to this day in south Texas and northern Mexico in two widely separated communities. The present volume includes a selection of his Roma-related writings, but he also has over two hundred publications dealing with Creole languages. His very first was about Sierra Leone Krio, and appeared in a 1964 issue of The Linguist magazine.

            Ian’s involvement in the Romani struggle began at about the same time that he became a student. Although he had grown up in an urban Romani household, he was not politicised. But then several incidents occurred in Britain’s West Midlands that warranted brief mention in The Evening Standard newspaper, and they so upset him that he felt moved to become involved. In the first, a Gypsy man needed to pull his trailer off the road because his wife was going into labour, but was ordered to move on by the police. When the man refused he was driven away and thrown into a prison cell where he was badly beaten by the same officers, his pregnant wife and small children having been left alone on the side of the road. In a similar incident, both of the parents were taken into custody, leaving the children by themselves in the trailer. A paraffin lamp was knocked over and a fire spread that resulted in the death of all three Gypsy children. This was during the 1960s, when the police would contract professional teams using bulldozers, axes and other brutal means to move people on, a phenomenon that Ian describes in his book The Pariah Syndrome.

            Ian made contact with the Gypsy Education Council, through which he met three non-Romanies who were to have a profound influence on the direction his life was taking: Thomas Acton, Donald Kenrick and Grattan Puxon. They encouraged his participation in Romani advocacy and rights issues and he found himself playing a key role in the first World Romani Congress, held near London in 1971, where he first met some of the major figures in the Romani movement.

            In the same year Ian left the University of London with a PhD, the first in Britain to be awarded to a Gypsy. It was in African linguistics, with a specialisation in creole languages. As it happened, The University of Texas was looking for an expert in creolistics, and Ian was offered a job there while speaking at a conference in Washington DC in 1972. This was once again the result of his being in the right place at the right time – the original speaker invited to that conference lived in Hawaii and was unable to attend, so gave his ticket to Ian to go in his place. If Ian had not gone to Washington, he would have missed the offer. With his new doctorate, Ian had applied to over seventy universities for jobs, but had got nowhere. And here was an offer from one he had not even applied to. He had to borrow the money to fly to Austin.

            As a new assistant professor at The University of Texas, Ian was taken under the wing of a senior faculty member, the late Edgar Polomé, who gave him the same advice, offered in good faith, that Ian had previously received from his supervisor at SOAS – that drawing attention to his Gypsy identity would hinder him academically. He consequently kept quiet about it until he received tenure—and hence job security—in his fourth year, a process which generally takes six years. He immediately began to compile the Romani Archives and to publish widely on Romani topics, both linguistic and sociopolitical. The Archives, which line the walls ceiling-high and is piled up on the floor of Ian’s office at The University of Texas, is now known as the Romani Archives and Documentation Center, and is the biggest collection of its kind in the world.

            Despite these remarkable achievements, Ian has become a controversial figure in some quarters. His linguistic theories have come under attack, and his sometimes outspoken criticism of the non-Romani monopolisation of Romani Studies has alienated him from some of those specialists. But it has been his effort to bring the details of the Porrajmos, the Romani Holocaust, to popular and academic attention which has caused him to be viewed with the most suspicion. Can it be that his determination to uncover the truth of what happened to the estimated million or more of his own people has caused discomfort in some quarters? He provides a wonderful Romani proverb in his book We Are the Romani People: ‘He who is about to tell the truth should have one foot in the stirrup.’ In recent years Ian has found himself dropped from the US Holocaust Memorial Council (to which he had been appointed by President Clinton in 1997), the Anne Frank Institute and the Project on Ethnic Relations Roma Advisory Board. Why was this?

            One of Ian’s most strident positions is found in Responses, which you will find in this volume, an essay which has provoked controversy and generated debate in no small measure. Ian is asking difficult questions here. Are Gypsies once again being accused of trespassing, of stealing the property of others? Have those age-old accusations now spilt over into the academic realm? Or is it the ‘overly nationalistic’ position that he and other Romani intellectuals espouse which raises hackles? Can it be that those non-Gypsy organisations which seek the assimilation and ultimate disappearance of Roma have no truck with him because he speaks instead of integration and self determination? Is this the more profound truth that remains at the edges of the modern-day diaspora experience? Many European-based organisations, Ian argues, refuse to acknowledge the complexity of Romani history and the reality that Roma are a global people, and not simply a collection of disparate groups scattered throughout Europe.

            If his scholarly views are perceived to be a threat by some intellectuals and scholars, then this is hardly a surprise. The ‘Other’ who ventures bravely in will always be a threat. The wheel of life turns, but it turns slowly. The most important fact to remember is that the wheel does turn. And the reader of this volume is free to judge Ian Hancock for himself – his views and the people for whom he speaks. This is an important step forward. Once, and it is not so long ago, the Roma were enslaved and their linguistic and cultural inheritances derided or ignored altogether. Today, both Roma and non-Roma are freer to read and debate, and come to better informed conclusions.

            Ian’s achievements, though, overwhelmingly override those of his detractors: he accepted the prestigious international Rafto Foundation human rights prize in Norway in 1997; he received the Gamaliel Chair in Peace and Justice from the University of Wisconsin in 1998; and in the same year was appointed by President Clinton to represent Roma on the US Holocaust Memorial Council. He was part of a four-man team led by the late Yul Brynner that presented the petition to the United Nations for Romani membership in 1978, and has served as representative on the UN Economic and Social Council and in UNICEF. He was awarded an honorary doctorate with distinction from Umeå University in 2002, and another from Constantine University in Slovakia in 2009. A scholarship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been established in his name at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. In March 2003, he was invited by the Dalai Lama to a private meeting in India. He has received certificates of recognition from Yeshiva University and other institutions. He has a place in Leland Robison’s Calendar of Prominent Ethnic Americans and an entry in Barkan’s Making it in America: A Sourcebook on Eminent Ethnic Americans. He is consulted regularly by the BBC World Service and by National Public Radio in the US; he has spoken before special Congressional hearings in Washington DC, and has addressed audiences in North and South America, Europe and Japan.

            The honours and recognition attest to the existence of much goodwill felt by enlightened members of the larger society toward the Roma. Ian’s own life and work have gone a long way in promoting this goodwill where it existed, and in creating it where it did not. However, despite his many accomplishments, it would be too early to say that Ian’s work is done. While there is a verbal and intellectual acknowledgment of the Roma’s plight, the lot of millions of Roma is still one of oppression. Atrocities against them continue to be reported in the press, especially in Eastern Europe. Even in the academic discipline of Romani studies, the Roma are not masters of their own destiny. Non-Romani linguists have discovered the Romani language and are being given huge grants to study it, to the tune of half a million pounds and more. Meanwhile, Romani families are forced to deal with Romaphobia on a daily basis while struggling to find decent jobs, housing, education and healthcare, seeking no less and no more opportunity than that enjoyed by their non-Romani neighbours. It is surely a collective insult to the twelve million Roma that no university to this day in North America sponsors a chair of Romani Studies, while much smaller populations enjoy such privileges, as in the Basque Studies Center at the University of  Nevada, which is devoted to the half-million-strong Basque people. It is a collective slight to the Roma that Ian has gotten no formal recognition from The University of Texas, where he works, although his contributions have merited recognition by the Texas House of Representatives in a public ceremony in the state Capitol, and where he is a member of the State Commission on Holocaust and Genocide.

            This book is a compendium of Ian Hancock’s view of the Romani experience. No one will agree with everything he has to say but, undeniably, it is the first-ever book of its kind written by a Romani person for a non-Romani audience, and must surely pave the way for a new genre of ‘Gypsy Literature’. His main historical contributions have been to correct widely and wrongly assumed theories, by establishing that the conventionally-accepted scenario of a single, ancient, first Romani migration that split into three diverging branches is not correct; that participants in that migration were not one people speaking one language; and that the migration could not have pre-dated 1000 AD. Ian is also the first to have articulated the profound paradox that lies at the heart of Romani identity and which accounts for the ‘square peg’ conflicts that divide the Gypsy and non-Gypsy worlds – that the Roma are an Asian people, ‘speaking an Asian language and maintaining an Asian culture’, but that they are also a people who have only ever existed in the West.

            Ian Hancock’s impact upon Romani Studies has been truly remarkable, both in terms of its historiography and in its reassessment of Romani identity within the Western cultural fabric. In the words of Professor Thomas Acton OBE, Chair of Romani Studies at Greenwich University in London, Hancock is leading us into ‘a major period of intellectual transition in the perspectives which govern Romani Studies’. In the process, he is forcing us to ‘reshape our own views of the canon from which we are selecting’.

            Ian’s biggest impact, surely, has been amongst Roma themselves, and perhaps this is the true measure of success: recognition within one’s own community. In 1993 he created Romnet, the first interactive Romani website, which became the model for those that came after. He is a member of the International Romani Parliament based in Vienna. His position as a university professor brings him emails every week from Roma who are either in college or hope to go to college and who are looking for advice and encouragement; those young people are not only entering unfamiliar territory, but sadly and too often have to deal with indifference or even scorn from their very own families. Ian has served as a model for other Romani leaders, too: teacher and activist Gregory Dufunia Kwiek wrote that after reading The Pariah Syndrome, he ‘underwent a radical change; I understood the history behind my problems and realised it was time to live my life as I was – a Rom. Being equipped with this knowledge I am now able to fight both my fears and the fears of the non-Gypsies as well.’ The Argentine Romani leader Lolya Bernal wrote, ‘In the early 1980s I received a letter from Professor Ian Hancock. Who was this man who showed me a totally different world of which I could be even prouder? There in my hands through his letters an entirely new world was appearing, the origin of our culture, traditions, language, the clues to our Indian origin and many other things, none of which were taught us by the gadže (non-Roma). It encouraged me to continue working on our tales, language and, later, politics in searching for our destiny.’

            As Ian’s circle of influence expands, testimonials such as these are sent with unflagging regularity. As the sincerest tribute that could be given to Ian’s life and work, I have collected a few more of them in the pages that follow. To them, I add my own salutations.

Me dav tut and’o rrundo patjivale Rroma, te le Del na terdjon te den zor tjire lavenge.

 

 

Dileep Karanth       

Kenosha, Wisconsin

June 2009

Interests

Romani; Creole; English; Human rights

LIN 323L • English As A World Language

40040 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 301
(also listed as E 323L )
show description

E 323L  l  English as a World Language

Instructor:  Hancock, I

Unique #:  34670

Semester:  Spring 2015

Cross-lists:  LIN 323L

Computer Instruction:  No

Flags:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines the growth and spread of English around the world. We begin with an overview of linguistic concept and terminology. Then we turn to a brief account of the historical and social forces that shaped the Age of Exploration especially in regard to the English-speaking peoples of Britain. We will look at the transplantation process of the language to Ireland; American, in the larger sense of that term which includes Canada and the Caribbean; Africa; Central and Southeast Asia; and Oceania; and we will develop a linguistic profile of the varieties of English in those regions.

Requirements & Grading: There will be four in-class, closed book, hand in exams across the semester which will count for your grade, each test consisting of five questions (chosen out of ten) with a total of 100 points. The average will be taken from the first three, requiring 90% or higher for an A grade. You may also lose, but not gain, points for attendance and participation. There will be take-home assignments from time to time. The entire class policy will be included in the workbook for this course, available from Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall.

LIN 350 • Creole Langs & Their Speakers

40059 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 204
(also listed as E 364D )
show description

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This class in Creole Studies will begin with a general discussion of the nature of pidginized and creolized languages, and we will listen to tape-recorded samples and examine some publications written in them. No attempt will be made at this point to draw any conclusions about what kind of languages they are, or where they come from. This will be followed by an account of the development of the field of Creole Studies (Creolistics), from Pelleprat (1649) to the present. The major approaches—monogeneticist, polygeneticist, relexificationalist, substratist, componentialist, bioprogram—will be dealt with, and the works of their main proponents read and discussed.

This will be followed by an examination of the definitions of the terms pidgin and creole, and of other so-called ‘marginal’ languages (traders’ jargons, cryptolectal varieties, foreigner speech, etc.), in order to justify their inclusion, or otherwise, as true cases of pidginized or creolized languages. This will be followed by a survey of the world’s pidgins and creoles, and a detailed examination of the history and linguistic features of a small number of representative languages, with tape-recorded texts for analysis. There will be particular focus on these languages that are spoken in the Americas, including African American Vernacular (“Black English”), Texas Afro-Seminole Gullah and Louisiana Creole French, as well as the American contact languages Yamá and Chinuk Wawa among others.

Towards the end of the course we shall return to the issues raised at the beginning, and attempt a definition of the processes and typologies. We will also look at creolization as it relates to acquisitionist theory, the process of decreolization/metropolitanization, and issues of education and standard language reform.

LIN 360K • Intro To English Grammar

41110 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 105
(also listed as E 360K )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I

Unique #:  35870

Semester:  Fall 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 360K

Flags:  n/a

Computer instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description: This course is an introduction to the grammar of written English. It deals initially with traditional methods of linguistic analysis, presenting them as groundwork for introducing Chomskyan or TG (“transformational-generative”) grammar. Most of the course will consist of acquiring skills in this theory, using interpretations found in Radford and in Jacobs and Rosenbaum. An overview of basic linguistic theory will also be included, introducing and defining the concepts of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax and lexicon.

The course is designed mainly, though not exclusively, for student teachers, and places especial emphasis on language attitudes and evaluation. Written, or “book” English will be presented as the dialect having the most widespread applicability and usefulness. It will not be presented as the “best” English, or as the only dialect that has “correct grammar,” but rather as the one most appropriate in the greatest number of social contexts—that is, as a maximally useful tool.

Increasingly, teachers are dealing with speakers of vernacular English in their classrooms, i.e. ethnic, regional or immigrant dialects, but they are not always properly prepared to distinguish between good and bad English on the one hand, and appropriate and inappropriate English on the other. For example, the general reaction to the common Southern construction “I might could do it” and “I could might do it” is that they are both bad English, though the reason for that decision is different for each sentence.

It is a sociolinguistic maxim that our attitudes towards an individual's language or dialect are really a reflection of our attitude towards the group that that individual belongs to. Students have often been penalized for using their natural speech, especially if it differs markedly from the written dialect, and this can have its origin in attitudes we may have, whether we're teachers or not, to different American populations. Part of the course will ask us to confront those attitudes, and will include ways to deal with them. We will also see that all natural dialects are rule governed, and that there is a “grammatical” and an “ungrammatical” way to speak any one of them.

Transformational-Generative Grammar has come a very long way since its early days.  While outside reading is encouraged, if you’ve found a book on your own talk it over with me since differences in terminology and approach from author to author can easily confuse you.  Questions on the tests will be based ONLY upon material presented in class.

Texts: None, but a reading list will be provided.

Requirements & Grading: Four in-class, closed book, period-long written tests across the semester, 80%
; Attendance and participation, 20%.

LIN F350 • Creole Langs & Their Speakers

85750 • Summer 2014
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 204
(also listed as AFR F372G, E F364D )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I

Unique #:  83215

Semester:  Summer 2014, first session

Cross-lists:  LIN 350

Flags:  n/a

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This class in Creole Studies will begin with a general discussion of the nature of pidginized and creolized languages, and we will listen to tape-recorded samples and examine some publications written in them. No attempt will be made at this point to draw any conclusions about what kind of languages they are, or where they come from. This will be followed by an account of the development of the field of Creole Studies (Creolistics), from Pelleprat (1649) to the present. The major approaches—monogeneticist, polygeneticist, relexificationalist, substratist, componentialist, bioprogram—will be dealt with, and the works of their main proponents read and discussed.

This will be followed by an examination of the definitions of the terms pidgin and creole, and of other so-called ‘marginal’ languages (traders’ jargons, cryptolectal varieties, foreigner speech, etc.), in order to justify their inclusion, or otherwise, as true cases of pidginized or creolized languages. This will be followed by a survey of the world’s pidgins and creoles, and a detailed examination of the history and linguistic features of a small number of representative languages, with tape-recorded texts for analysis. There will be particular focus on these languages that are spoken in the Americas, including African American Vernacular (“Black English”), Texas Afro-Seminole Gullah and Louisiana Creole French, as well as the American contact languages Yamá and Chinuk Wawa among others.

Towards the end of the course we shall return to the issues raised at the beginning, and attempt a definition of the processes and typologies. We will also look at creolization as it relates to acquisitionist theory, the process of decreolization/metropolitanization, and issues of education and standard language reform.

Proposed Texts/Readings:

Ammon, Ulrich, Norbert Dittmar and K. Mattheier (eds.), Sociolinguistics: An International Handbook of the Science of Language and Society. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2007 edition, pp. 459-469.

Arends, J., 1995. The Early Stages of Creolization. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Bakker, P., & M. Mous, eds., 1994. Mixed Languages: 15 Case Studies of Language Intertwining. Amsterdam: IFOTT.

Byrne, F., & T. Huebner, eds., 1991. Development and Structure of Creole Languages. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Couto, H. do, 1996. Introduciio ao Estudio das Linguas Crioulas e Pidgins. Brasilia: Editora UnB.

Edwards, W., & D. Winford, eds., 1991. Verb Phrase Patterns in Black English and Creole. Detroit: Wayne State UP.

Escure, G., & A. Schwegler, 2004. Creoles, Contact and Language Change. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Grant, A., 2003. Papers in Contact Linguistics. Bradford: The University Press.

Hancock, I., 1979. Readings in Creole Studies. Ghent: Story-Scientia.

Hancock, I., 1985. Diversity and Development in Creole Studies. Ann Arbor: Karoma.

Holm, J., 2000. An Introduction to Pidgins and Creoles. Cambridge: CUP.

Holm, J., 2004. Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars. Cambridge: CUP.

Holm, J., & P. Patrick, 2007. Comparative Creoles Syntax: Parallel Outlines of 18 Creole Grammars. London: Westminster UP.

Kouwenberg, S., 2003. Twice as Meaningful: Reduplication in Pidgins, Creoles and Other Contact Languages. London: Westminster UP.

Lehiste, I., 1988. Lectures on Language Contact. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Le Page, Robert, & Annegret Tabouret-Keller, 1985. Acts of Identity. Cambridge UP.

Matras, Y., & P. Bakker, 2003. The Mixed Language Debate. Amsterdam: Mouton.

Morgan, M., ed., 1994. Language and The Social Construction of Identity in Creole situations. Los Angeles: UCLA.

Neumann-Holzschuh, 1., & E. Schneider, eds., 2000. Degrees of Restructuring in Creole Languages. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Polomé, Edgar, 1990. Research Guide on Language Change. Berlin: Mouton-DeGruyter.

Romaine, S., 1988. Pidgin and Creole Languages. Harlow: Longman.

Sebba, M., 1997. Contact Languages: Pidgins and Creoles. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Singh, I., 2000. Pidgins and Creoles: An Introduction. London: Arnold.

Thomason, S., 2001. Language contact: An Introduction. Washington: Georgetown UP.

Requirements & Grading: You’ll be graded on (a) two closed book, period long, hand in tests and (b) the composition and presentation of a research paper, and (c) on your evaluation of the papers of the others in the class. Each of you will have a whole period at the end of the semester (half for presentation, half for questions and evaluation by everyone else). The tests are 10% each, the evaluations 10%, attendance and participation 10% and your paper 60%.

LIN 350 • Creole Langs & Their Speakers

41460 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm MEZ 1.118
(also listed as E 364D )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I

Unique #:  36137

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 350

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This class in Creole Studies will begin with a general discussion of the nature of pidginized and creolized languages, and we will listen to tape-recorded samples and examine some publications written in them. No attempt will be made at this point to draw any conclusions about what kind of languages they are, or where they come from. This will be followed by an account of the development of the field of Creole Studies (Creolistics), from Pelleprat (1649) to the present. The major approaches—monogeneticist, polygeneticist, relexificationalist, substratist, componentialist, bioprogram—will be dealt with, and the works of their main proponents read and discussed.

This will be followed by an examination of the definitions of the terms pidgin and creole, and of other so-called ‘marginal’ languages (traders’ jargons, cryptolectal varieties, foreigner speech, etc.), in order to justify their inclusion, or otherwise, as true cases of pidginized or creolized languages. This will be followed by a survey of the world’s pidgins and creoles, and a detailed examination of the history and linguistic features of a small number of representative languages, with tape-recorded texts for analysis. There will be particular focus on these languages that are spoken in the Americas, including African American Vernacular (“Black English”), Texas Afro-Seminole Gullah and Louisiana Creole French, as well as the American contact languages Yamá and Chinuk Wawa among others.

Towards the end of the course we shall return to the issues raised at the beginning, and attempt a definition of the processes and typologies. We will also look at creolization as it relates to acquisitionist theory, the process of decreolization/metropolitanization, and issues of education and standard language reform.

Proposed texts/readings:

Ammon, Ulrich, Norbert Dittmar and K. Mattheier (eds.), Sociolinguistics: An International Handbook of the Science of Language and Society. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2007 edition, pp. 459-469.

Arends, J., 1995. The Early Stages of Creolization. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Bakker, P., & M. Mous, eds., 1994. Mixed Languages: 15 Case Studies of Language Intertwining. Amsterdam: IFOTT.

Byrne, F., & T. Huebner, eds., 1991. Development and Structure of Creole Languages. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Couto, H. do, 1996. Introduciio ao Estudio das Linguas Crioulas e Pidgins. Brasilia: Editora UnB.

Edwards, W., & D. Winford, eds., 1991. Verb Phrase Patterns in Black English and Creole. Detroit: Wayne State UP.

Escure, G., & A. Schwegler, 2004. Creoles, Contact and Language Change. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Grant, A., 2003. Papers in Contact Linguistics. Bradford: The University Press.

Hancock, I., 1979. Readings in Creole Studies. Ghent: Story-Scientia.

Hancock, I., 1985. Diversity and Development in Creole Studies. Ann Arbor: Karoma.

Holm, J., 2000. An Introduction to Pidgins and Creoles. Cambridge: CUP.

Holm, J., 2004. Languages in Contact: The Partial Restructuring of Vernaculars. Cambridge: CUP.

Holm, J., & P. Patrick, 2007. Comparative Creoles Syntax: Parallel Outlines of 18 Creole Grammars. London: Westminster UP.

Kouwenberg, S., 2003. Twice as Meaningful: Reduplication in Pidgins, Creoles and Other Contact Languages. London: Westminster UP.

Lehiste, I., 1988. Lectures on Language Contact. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Le Page, Robert, & Annegret Tabouret-Keller, 1985. Acts of Identity. Cambridge UP.

Matras, Y., & P. Bakker, 2003. The Mixed Language Debate. Amsterdam: Mouton.

Morgan, M., ed., 1994. Language and The Social Construction of Identity in Creole situations. Los Angeles: UCLA.

Neumann-Holzschuh, 1., & E. Schneider, eds., 2000. Degrees of Restructuring in Creole Languages. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Polomé, Edgar, 1990. Research Guide on Language Change. Berlin: Mouton-DeGruyter.

Romaine, S., 1988. Pidgin and Creole Languages. Harlow: Longman.

Sebba, M., 1997. Contact Languages: Pidgins and Creoles. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Singh, I., 2000. Pidgins and Creoles: An Introduction. London: Arnold.

Thomason, S., 2001. Language contact: An Introduction. Washington: Georgetown UP.

Requirements & Grading: You’ll be graded on (a) two closed book, period long, hand in tests and (b) the composition and presentation of a research paper, and (c) on your evaluation of the papers of the others in the class. Each of you will have a whole period at the end of the semester (half for presentation, half for questions and evaluation by everyone else). The tests are 10% each, the evaluations 10%, attendance and participation 10% and your paper 60%.

LIN 360K • Intro To English Grammar

41505 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 105
(also listed as E 360K )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I

Unique #:  36095

Semester:  Spring 2014

Cross-lists:  LIN 360K

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description: This course is an introduction to the grammar of written English. It deals initially with traditional methods of linguistic analysis, presenting them as groundwork for introducing Chomskyan or TG (“transformational-generative”) grammar. Most of the course will consist of acquiring skills in this theory, using interpretations found in Radford and in Jacobs and Rosenbaum. An overview of basic linguistic theory will also be included, introducing and defining the concepts of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax and lexicon.

The course is designed mainly, though not exclusively, for student teachers, and places especial emphasis on language attitudes and evaluation. Written, or “book” English will be presented as the dialect having the most widespread applicability and usefulness. It will not be presented as the “best” English, or as the only dialect that has “correct grammar,” but rather as the one most appropriate in the greatest number of social contexts—that is, as a maximally useful tool.

Increasingly, teachers are dealing with speakers of vernacular English in their classrooms, i.e. ethnic, regional or immigrant dialects, but they are not always properly prepared to distinguish between good and bad English on the one hand, and appropriate and inappropriate English on the other. For example, the general reaction to the common Southern construction “I might could do it” and “I could might do it” is that they are both bad English, though the reason for that decision is different for each sentence.

It is a sociolinguistic maxim that our attitudes towards an individual's language or dialect are really a reflection of our attitude towards the group that that individual belongs to. Students have often been penalized for using their natural speech, especially if it differs markedly from the written dialect, and this can have its origin in attitudes we may have, whether we're teachers or not, to different American populations. Part of the course will ask us to confront those attitudes, and will include ways to deal with them. We will also see that all natural dialects are rule governed, and that there is a “grammatical” and an “ungrammatical” way to speak any one of them.

Transformational-Generative Grammar has come a very long way since its early days.  While outside reading is encouraged, if you’ve found a book on your own talk it over with me since differences in terminology and approach from author to author can easily confuse you.  Questions on the tests will be based ONLY upon material presented in class.

Texts: None, but a reading list will be provided.

Requirements & Grading: Four in-class, closed book, period-long written tests across the semester, 80%
; Attendance and participation, 20%.

LIN 360K • Intro To English Grammar

41345 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 105
(also listed as E 360K )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I            Areas:  IV / U

Unique #:  35880            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Fall 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LIN 360K            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing

Description: This course is an introduction to the grammar of written English. It deals initially with traditional methods of linguistic analysis, presenting them as groundwork for introducing Chomskyan or TG ("transformational-generative") grammar. Most of the course will consist of acquiring skills in this theory, using interpretations found in Radford and in Jacobs and Rosenbaum. An overview of basic linguistic theory will also be included, introducing and defining the concepts of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax and lexicon.

The course is designed mainly, though not exclusively, for student teachers, and places especial emphasis on language attitudes and evaluation. Written, or "book" English will be presented as the dialect having the most widespread applicability and usefulness. It will not be presented as the "best" English, or as the only dialect that has "correct grammar," but rather as the one most appropriate in the greatest number of social contexts--that is, as a maximally useful tool.

Increasingly, teachers are dealing with speakers of vernacular English in their classrooms, i.e. ethnic, regional or immigrant dialects, but they are not always properly prepared to distinguish between "good" and "bad" English on the one hand, and "appropriate" and "inappropriate" English on the other. For example, the general reaction to I might could do it and I could might do it is that they are both "bad" English, though the reason for that decision is different for each sentence.

It is a sociolinguistic maxim that our attitudes towards an individual's language or dialect are really a reflection of our attitude towards the group that that individual belongs to. Students have often been penalized for using their natural speech, especially if it differs markedly from the written dialect, and this can have its origin in attitudes we may have, whether we're teachers or not, to different American populations. Part of the course will ask us to confront those attitudes, and will include ways to deal with them.

Texts: None, but a reading list will be provided.

Requirements & Grading: Four in-class, closed book, period-long written tests across the semester, 80%
; Attendance and participation, 20%.

LIN S322 • Gypsy Language And Culture

86130 • Summer 2013
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am BEN 1.122
(also listed as ANT S324L, E S350E, MES S342, REE S325 )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I            Areas:  IV / D

Unique #:  83755            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Summer 2013, second session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  ANT 324L, LIN 322, MES 322K            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course presents the linguistic history of the Romani ("Gypsy") people, from 11th Century AD India to the present day. Theories relating to this exodus out of the Subcontinent and the subsequent migrations into Europe are discussed on the basis of the social and linguistic evidence available to us. In addition to studying aspects of the lexicon and syntax of the modern American and European dialects of the Romani language, an introduction to Gypsy history and culture will also form part of the course. We will examine the sociology of this Diaspora people, the Indian roots of their music, cuisine and social traditions, external linguistic and cultural influences, and interactions with non-Gypsy peoples. The reasons for the persistence of the stereotypical image of the Gypsy among non-Gypsies will be discussed, and also examined will be the five hundred years of slavery, transportation to the American plantations, the fate of the Romani people in the Holocaust, and the current struggle for civil and political rights since Gypsies gained admittance to the United Nations Organization in 1979.

Texts: Required: Hancock, We Are the Romani People. Course supplement available from Speedway Copying in Dobie Mall.

Requirements & Grading: One (1) term paper, 25%; three (3) written tests, 60%; one (1) book or film report, 15%.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40895 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm UTC 4.122
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. In what ways do languages differ? In what ways are languages the same? How do languages change over time? Why do languages change? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communicating? Do dolphins speak? How do children learn language, and how do adults learn language? Does language control our view of reality? How does language interact with social class? What kind of language should be taught in schools? What language problems do other countries have? What are the different language families of the world? The course will deal with sociolinguistics (language in society), historical linguistics (language change and language relationships), and formal linguistics. Basic material covered under formal linguistics includes phonetics (the properties of speech sounds), phonology (the systematic sound patterns of language), morphology (the grammatical structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), and semantics/pragmatics (the meaning and use of words and sentences).

A coursebook is required for this class, and may be purchased from Speedway Copy.

LIN 364M • History Of English Language

40985 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 206
(also listed as E 364M )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I            Areas:  IV / D

Unique #:  35605            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2013            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LIN 364M            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course explores the origin, development and spread of the English language diachronically, i.e. over time, since it was taken into the British Isles in the fifth century AD. It will begin with an introduction to the linguistic concepts necessary for the course, and examine where English belongs amongst the world’s 6,000+ languages. We will follow its development from Old English (Beowulf) through Middle English (Chaucer) to Modern English, and discuss how, a thousand years ago, a language with no more speakers than the population of Houston, has grown to be the most widely spoken on the planet today.

Texts: You will need the workbook for this class, obtainable from Speedway Copy. The course will be supplemented with one or two documentary films and (possibly) a guest speaker.

Requirements & Grading: Your grade will be based upon four in-class, closed-book, hand-in written tests, the lowest score of the first three being dropped and an average taken from the remaining three. This will account for 80% of your grade, the remaining 20% will be based upon attendance and participation.

LIN 322 • Gypsy Language And Culture

40755 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm PAR 201
(also listed as ANT 324L, E 350E, MES 342 )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I            Areas:  IV / D

Unique #:  35485            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Fall 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  ANT 324L, LIN 322, MES 322K            Computer Instruction:  No

E 350E (Topic: Gypsy Language and Culture) and 379N (Topic: Gypsy Language and Culture) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course presents the linguistic history of the Romani ("Gypsy") people, from 11th Century AD India to the present day. Theories relating to this exodus out of the Subcontinent and the subsequent migrations into Europe are discussed on the basis of the social and linguistic evidence available to us. In addition to studying aspects of the lexicon and syntax of the modern American and European dialects of the Romani language, an introduction to Gypsy history and culture will also form part of the course. We will examine the sociology of this Diaspora people, the Indian roots of their music, cuisine and social traditions, external linguistic and cultural influences, and interactions with non-Gypsy peoples. The reasons for the persistence of the stereotypical image of the Gypsy among non-Gypsies will be discussed, and also examined will be the five hundred years of slavery, transportation to the American plantations, the fate of the Romani people in the Holocaust, and the current struggle for civil and political rights since Gypsies gained admittance to the United Nations Organization in 1979.

Texts: Required: Hancock, We Are the Romani People. Course supplement available from Speedway Copying in Dobie Mall.

Requirements & Grading: 1 term paper, 25%; 3 written tests, 60%; 1 book or film report, 15%.

LIN F322 • Gypsy Language And Culture

86290 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am GAR 0.132
(also listed as ANT F324L, E F350E, MES F322K )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I            Areas:  IV / D

Unique #:  83675            Flags:  Global Cultures

Semester:  Summer 2012, first session            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  ANT 322M, LIN 322, MES 322K            Computer Instruction:  No

E 350E (Topic: Gypsy Language and Culture) and 379N (Topic: Gypsy Language and Culture) may not both be counted.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course presents the linguistic history of the Romani ("Gypsy") people, from 11th Century AD India to the present day. Theories relating to this exodus out of the Subcontinent and the subsequent migrations into Europe are discussed on the basis of the social and linguistic evidence available to us. In addition to studying aspects of the lexicon and syntax of the modern American and European dialects of the Romani language, an introduction to Gypsy history and culture will also form part of the course. We will examine the sociology of this Diaspora people, the Indian roots of their music, cuisine and social traditions, external linguistic and cultural influences, and interactions with non-Gypsy peoples. The reasons for the persistence of the stereotypical image of the Gypsy among non-Gypsies will be discussed, and also examined will be the five hundred years of slavery, transportation to the American plantations, the fate of the Romani people in the Holocaust, and the current struggle for civil and political rights since Gypsies gained admittance to the United Nations Organization in 1979.

Texts: Required: Hancock, We Are the Romani People. Course supplement available from Speedway Copying in Dobie Mall.

Requirements & Grading: 1 term paper, 25%; 3 written tests, 60%; 1 book or film report, 15%.

LIN 323L • English As A World Language

40770 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 105
(also listed as E 323L )
show description

Instructor:  Hancock, I            Areas:  IV / G

Unique #:  35195            Flags:  n/a

Semester:  Spring 2012            Restrictions:  n/a

Cross-lists:  LIN 323L            Computer Instruction:  No

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

Description: This course examines the growth and spread of English around the world. We begin with an overview of linguistic concept and terminology. Then we turn to a brief account of the historical and social forces that shaped the Age of Exploration especially in regard to the English-speaking peoples of Britain. We will look at the transplantation process of the language to Ireland; American, in the larger sense of that term which includes Canada and the Caribbean; Africa; Central and Southeast Asia; and Oceania; and we will develop a linguistic profile of the varieties of English in those regions.

Requirements & Grading: There will be four in-class, closed book, hand in exams across the semester which will count for your grade, each test consisting of five questions (chosen out of ten) with a total of 100 points. The average will be taken from the first three, requiring 90% or higher for an A grade. You may also lose, but not gain, points for attendance and participation. There will be take-home assignments from time to time. The entire class policy will be included in the workbook for this course, available from Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall.

LIN 392 • Creole And Pidgin Languages

40905 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm PAR 305
(also listed as E 395N )
show description

Creole And Pidgin Languages

This graduate seminar in Creole Studies will begin with a general discussion of the nature of pidgin and creole languages, and we will listen to tape-recorded samples and examine some publications written in them. No attempt will be made at this point to draw any conclusions about what kind of languages they are, or where they come from. This will be followed by an account of the development of the field of Creole Studies (Creolistics). from Pelleprat (1649) to the present. The major approaches - monogeneticist, polygeneticist, relexificationalist, substratist, componentlalist, bioprogram - will be examined, and the works of their main proponents read and discussed. This will then be followed by an analysis of the definitions of the terms pidgin and creole, and of other so-called 'marginal' languages (traders' jargons, cryptolectal varieties, foreigner speech, etc.), in order to justify their inclusion, or otherwise, as true cases of pidginized or creolized languages. This will be followed by a survey of the world's pidgins and creoles, and a detailed examination of the history and linguistic features of a small number of representative languages, with tape-recorded texts for analysis. These will include African American Vernacular ("Black English"), Texas Afro-Seminole Gullah and Louisiana Creole French, among others. We will also look at Creole literature and the works of some Creole authors. Towards the end of the course we shall return to the issues raised at the beginning, and attempt a definition of the processes and typologies. We will also look at creolization as it relates to acquisitionist theory, the process of decreolization/metropolitanization, and issues of education and standard language reform.

Grading Policy

Grade for the course will be based on a research paper (I will provide a list of suggested topics). An extensive background in linguistics is not essential for this class, but taking good notes is. If there is any particular related topic you would like included in the course, let me know beforehand and I'll try to incorporate it.

Texts

There is a workbook you will need to get (from Speedway Copy, in Dobie Mall), and I will provide supplemental handouts.

LIN 306 • Intro To The Study Of Language

40665 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GSB 2.126
show description

This course will introduce you to linguistics, the scientific study of language. In what ways do languages differ? In what ways are languages the same? How do languages change over time? Why do languages change? What are the differences between verbal and non-verbal communicating? Do dolphins speak? How do children learn language, and how do adults learn language? Does language control our view of reality? How does language interact with social class? What kind of language should be taught in schools? What language problems do other countries have? What are the different language families of the world? The course will deal with sociolinguistics (language in society), historical linguistics (language change and language relationships), and formal linguistics. Basic material covered under formal linguistics includes phonetics (the properties of speech sounds), phonology (the systematic sound patterns of language), morphology (the grammatical structure of words), syntax (the structure of sentences), and semantics/pragmatics (the meaning and use of words and sentences).

A coursebook is required for this class, and may be purchased from Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall.

LIN F322 • Gypsy Language And Culture

86300 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 830am-1000am PAR 206
(also listed as ANT F324L, E F350E, MES F322K )
show description

E 350E (Topic: Gypsy Language and Culture) and 379N (Topic: Gypsy Language and Culture) may not both be counted.

 

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.

 

Description: This course presents the linguistic history of the Romani ("Gypsy") people, from 11th Century AD India to the present day. Theories relating to this exodus out of the Subcontinent and the subsequent migrations into Europe are discussed on the basis of the social and linguistic evidence available to us. In addition to studying aspects of the lexicon and syntax of the modern American and European dialects of the Romani language, an introduction to Gypsy history and culture will also form part of the course. We will examine the sociology of this Diaspora people, the Indian roots of their music, cuisine and social traditions, external linguistic and cultural influences, and interactions with non-Gypsy peoples. The reasons for the persistence of the stereotypical image of the Gypsy among non-Gypsies will be discussed, and also examined will be the five hundred years of slavery, transportation to the American plantations, the fate of the Romani people in the Holocaust, and the current struggle for civil and political rights since Gypsies gained admittance to the United Nations Organization in 1979. 

 

Texts: Required: Hancock, We Are the Romani People. Course supplement available from Speedway Copying in Dobie Mall.

 

Requirements & Grading: 1 term paper, 25%; 3 written tests, 60%; 1 book or film report, 15%.

LIN 323L • English As A World Language

40685 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am PAR 306
(also listed as E 323L )
show description

Cross-listed with LIN 323L

Description: This course examines the growth and spread of English around the world.  We begin with an overview of linguistic concept and terminology. Then we turn to a brief account of the historical and social forces that shaped the Age of Exploration especially in regard to the English-speaking peoples of Britain. We will look at the transplantation process of the language to Ireland; American, in the larger sense of that term which includes Canada and the Caribbean; Africa; Central and Southeast Asia; and Oceania; and we will develop a linguistic profile of the varieties of English in those regions.

Grading Policy: There will be four in-class, closed book, hand in exams across the semester which will count for your grade, each test consisting of five questions (chosen out of ten) with a total of 100 points.  The average will be taken from the first three, requiring 90% or higher for an A grade.  You may also lose, but not gain, points for attendance and participation.  There will be take-home assignments from time to time.  The entire class policy will be included in the workbook for this course, available from Speedway Copy in Dobie Mall.

Prerequisites: Nine semesters hours of coursework including English or rhetoric and writing. 

LIN 360K • Intro To English Grammar

40735 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 206
(also listed as E 360K )
show description

Cross-listed with LIN 360K

E 360K and LIN 360K may not both be counted.

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the grammar of written English. It deals initially with traditional methods of linguistic analysis, presenting them as groundwork for introducing Chomskyan or TG ("transformational-generative") grammar. Most of the course will consist of acquiring skills in this theory, using interpretations found in Radford and in Jacobs and Rosenbaum. An overview of basic linguistic theory will also be included, introducing and defining the concepts of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax and lexicon.

The course is designed mainly, though not exclusively, for student teachers, and places especial emphasis on language attitudes and evaluation. Written, or "book" English will be presented as the dialect having the most widespread applicability and usefulness. It will not be presented as the "best" English, or as the only dialect that has "correct grammar," but rather as the one most appropriate in the greatest number of social contexts--that is, as a maximally useful tool.

Increasingly, teachers are dealing with speakers of vernacular English in their classrooms, i.e. ethnic, regional or immigrant dialects, but they are not always properly prepared to distinguish between "good" and "bad" English on the one hand, and "appropriate" and "inappropriate" English on the other. For example, the general reaction to I might could do it and I could might do it is that they are both "bad" English, though the reason for that decision is different for each sentence.

It is a sociolinguistic maxim that our attitudes towards an individual's language or dialect are really a reflection of our attitude towards the group that that individual belongs to. Students have often been penalized for using their natural speech, especially if it differs markedly from the written dialect, and this can have its origin in attitudes we may have, whether we're teachers or not, to different American populations. Part of the course will ask us to confront those attitudes, and will include ways to deal with them.

Texts: None, but a reading list will be provided.

Grading: Four in-class, closed book, period-long written tests across the semester, 80%
; Attendance and participation, 20%.

Prerequisites: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing. 

LIN 322 • Gypsy Language And Culture-W

41115 • Spring 2010
Meets T 1100-1230pm CBA 4.332
(also listed as ANT 324L, MES 322K, REE 325 )
show description

For detailed Course Schedule, download attachment.

UGS 302 • Romani Reality & Gypsy Myth-W

64750 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 PAR 302
show description

This course is about the world’s 12 million Romani people, the so-called “Gypsies.” It will address their origins, migrations, culture and media and literary portrayal.  Examined also will be the challenges of ethnic/linguistic maintenance for various other diasporic peoples, the vulnerability of stateless or formerly stateless populations to discrimination and stereotyping, and the contemporary efforts on the part of such populations to resist and change those things.  Questions raised for discussion/debate will inter alia address the psychology of stereotyping and racism, and how ethnic groups with radically different cultural values and practices can adjust to coexist with those of the mainstream and continue to survive.  Requirements include three in-class, closed-book, hand-in exams across the semester and the preparation of a substantial research paper, the first draft of which must be completed and submitted by mid-term (October 14th, no exceptions), with the pre-final version to be presented before the class for comment and criticism from each of you during the last weeks of the semester.  This must be written with the potential submission for publication in mind.  Written exams will constitute 40% of the final grade, oral presentation, your paper and your critiques of the other presentations another 50%, and the remaining 10% will go to participation and attendance.  Substance will count more than volume.  We can arrange on-campus evening classes later in the semester if necessary.  

Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259. Discuss this with me first.

Assisting the class is fellow student Anna Brucker, who has taken this course previously and who is available to advise you on your progress and answer many of your questions.  Her e-mail is anna.brcker@gmail.com. 

The people at Library Instruction Services provide another valuable source of help. Check their website at http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~instruct/meet.html.  They will be glad to assist you with your writing assignment.  Do plan to visit them during the semester, they will let me know that you have done so.

For a detailed Course Syllabus, download attachment.

LIN 392 • Creole And Pidgin Languages

40648 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 MEZ 1.210
(also listed as E 395N )
show description

            Across the field of linguistics, more and more scholars are using experiments to investigate linguistic issues, and to provide evidence that stands up to skeptical scrutiny. This course is a hands-on introduction to how one does this. Students will design and run two small-scale experiments on any linguistic issue they choose: a production experiment oriented toward the speaker, and a corresponding reception experiment oriented toward the listener. The topic of the research can be in any area of linguistics, and involve any particular language.

            We will work through the process of doing an experiment step by step from the beginning:

  • Coming up with a hypothesis
  • Designing an experiment
  • Formulating and submitting a human subjects research proposal
  • Recording speech
  • Doing acoustic measurements using Praat
  • Synthesizing speech using Praat
  • Presenting stimuli
  • Running the experiment
  • Doing basic statistical analysis in R
  • Presenting results of experimental work - orally and in print.

          In order to learn how your work can be interpreted and evaluated, we will read and critique published work from the experimental literature in various areas of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, language processing, sociolinguistics, and language change. The readings will be made available in electronic form.

          The grade for the course will be based on two short papers presenting the results from the two pilot experiments.

          The course is open to any graduate student.

Publications

“Roma (Gypsies)”, in Jonathan Friedman, ed., The Routledge History of the Holocaust.  New York: Routledge.

“Jasenovac and the Roma,” in B. Lituchy (ed.) Jasenovac.  Proceedings of the 5th International conference on Jasenovac.  Banja Luca. In press.

Romani-go no Kantanna Bunpō to Bunshō.  Tokyo: Hakusuisha Publrs. (translator, Takeshi Mizutani). 2010 [A short grammar and phrase book of Romani].

Hancock, Ian, 2010.  “Current findings about Romani history and Romani contributions to the arts,” in Takahashi, ed., Relationship Between Eurasia and Japan: Mutual Interaction and Representation.  Osaka: The University Press.  Pp. 27-31.

“Mind the Doors! The Contribution of Linguistics in reconstructing history,” in Damian Le Bas, ed.), All Change!: Recent debates over the history and origin of Roma/Gypsies/Travellers. Hatfield: UH Press, 2010

“Symbols and dreams: Some thoughts on Kusturica’s ‘The Time of the Gypsies’,” in Huether, Andreas, Dara Waldron & Mícheál Ó hAodha, eds., 2009. Screening “Difference;” Visual Culture and the Nomadic “Other.” Essen: Die Blaue Eule Verlag, pp. 40-47.

“Introduction,” Ronald Lee, Romani-English Dictionary.  Montreal: Magoria Books. 2009.

“The ‘Gypsy’ Stereotype and the Sexualization of Romani Women,” in Valentina Glajar (ed.), Gypsies in Literature and Culture.  Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan. 2008.

“Romani and Angloromani,” in John Holm & Suzanne Michaelis, eds., Contact Languages.  New York: Routledge, 2007.

“Simon Wiesenthal and the Romanies,” in Michael Fineberg, Shimon Samuels & Mark Weitzman, eds., Antisemitism, the Generic hatred: Essays in Memory of Simon Wiesenthal.  London: Vallentine Mitchell.  2007.

“Romanies,” The New Book of Knowledge.  Danbury: Grolier/Scholastic. 2007.  pp. 299-301.

“Our need for internal diplomatic skills,” in V. Nicolae & Hanna Slavik, eds., Roma Diplomacy.  Brussels: European Roma Information Office. 2007.

“History of research on pidgins and creoles,” in Ulrich Ammon, Norbert Dittmar and K. Mattheier (eds.), Sociolinguistics: An International Handbook of the Science of Language and Society.  Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2007 edition, pp. 459-469.

“The Struggle for the Control of Identity,” in Ó hAodha & Hancock 2007:44-6.

“Romani and Angloromani,” in John Holm & Suzanne Michaelis, eds., Contact Languages.  New York: Routledge, 2007.

"Context is All’: The Reification of Symbol in Kusturica’s The Time of the Gypsies in Ó hAodha & Hancock 2007: 81-92.

“The Raggedy Rawney: Film as the Consolidation of Stereotype,” in Ó hAodha & Hancock 2007:93-99.

“Simon Wiesenthal and the Romanies,” in Michael Fineberg, Shimon Samuels & Mark Weitzman, eds., Antisemitism, the Generic hatred: Essays in Memory of Simon Wiesenthal.  London: Vallentine Mitchell.  2007.

“Our need for internal diplomatic skills,” in V. Nicolae & Hanna Slavik, eds., Roma Diplomacy.  Brussels: European Roma Information Office. 2007.

“Romanies,” The New Book of Knowledge.  Danbury: Grolier/Scholastic. 2007.  pp. 299-301.

“On Romani origins and identity”, in Adrian Marsh & Elin Strand, eds., Gypsies and the Problem of Identities: Contextual, Constructed and Contested.  Istanbul: Swedish Research Institute, pp. 69-92. 2006.

“Romani,” in Celeste Ray, ed., The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. University of North Carolina Press, 2006. Vol. 5,  pp.213-215.

“On the interpretation of a word: Porrajmos as Holocaust,” in Acton, Thomas, & Michael Hayes, eds., Travellers, Gypsies, Roma: The Demonisation of Difference, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars’ Press, pp. 53-57. 2006.

“Romani origins and Romani identity: a reassessment of the arguments,” in Acton, Thomas, & Michael Hayes, eds., 2006. Counter Hegemony and the Irish “Other.” Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars’ Press, pp. 86-96

“Dužnost i ljepota, vlastništvo i istina: jezničosi-romašenje kao kontrola,” in D.Tong (ed.), Romi: Interdiciplinarni Prikaz.  Belgrade: Ibis-Grafika, pp. 107-120.  2006.

Sindrom Parije: Pri…a o Ropstvu i Progonu Roma.  Zagreb: Ibis Grafika, 2006.

"Literature’s Gypsy and the real Romani,”in Michael Hayes & Thomas A. Acton, eds., 2006.  Counter-Hegemony and the Irish “Other”.  London: The Cambridge Scholars Press, pp. 18-27.

Introduction to Ronald Lee, Learn Romani. Hatfield: The University of Hertfordshire Press, 2006.  Pp. 8.

“On Romani origins and identity”, in Adrian Marsh & Elin Strand, eds., Gypsies and the Problem of Identities: Contextual, Constructed and Contested.  Istanbul: Swedish Research Institute, pp. 69-92. 2006.

“Dužnost i ljepota, vlasništvo i istina: Jezničosi-romašenje kao kontrola,” in Diane Tong, ed., Romi: Interdiciplinarni  Prikaz, Belgrade: Ibis-Grafika, pp. 107-120. 2006.

“Romani,” in Celeste Ray, ed., The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. University of North Carolina Press, 2006. Vol. 5,  pp.213-215.

“Romanies in 19th Century Europe,” in Jay Winter & John Merriman, Editors, Encyclopedia of  Europe 1789-1914, Macmillan: Farmington Hills, 2005.

“Romani Religion,” in Jeff Kaplan, Bron Taylor & Samuel S. Hill, eds., The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature (Gale, 2005).

A History of the Romanies.  Co-authored with Hristo Kjučukov.  Philadelphia: Boyds Mill Press, 2005.  Listed in the 2006 edition of The Best Children’s Books of the Year.

Carmen. Programme notes for the New York City Opera Company's Summer production. 2005, pp. 46-7.

Mi Vagyunk a Romani Nép.  Budapest: Pont Kiado [Hungarian language edition of We Are the Romani People]. 2004.

Paria Shindoromu: Jipushiasabetu no Rekishi to Kozo.  Tokyo: Sairyu Sha Publishers [Japanese language edition of The Pariah Syndrome]. 2004.

The Heroic Present: The Photographs of Jan Yoors and His Life with the Gypsies. The Monacelli Press, New York, 2004.

“Romanies (Gypsies).” The Encyclopedia of Europe Vol. 8: 1914-2004. John Merriman and Jay Winter, eds.-in-chief. New York: Charles Schribner’s Sons.

We Are the Romani People: Ame Sam e Rromane Džene.  Commissioned by the Open Society Institute (Soros Foundation) and published in 2002 by The University of Hertfordshire Press. 

Země Utrpení: Dějiny Otroctví a Pronásledování Romů, Prague: Signeta, 2001.

A Handbook of Vlax Romani.  Slavica, Inc., Columbus, 1995.

O ričh kaj nas.  Romani language transltion of the book The bear that wasn’t, by Frank Tashlin.  Dover Publications, New York (1946).  1994.

“(A)voiding ordure,” George Borrow Bulletin, 4:17 (1992).

The Texas Seminoles and their Language.  Publication of the Seminole Scout Association, Brackettville, 1991.

The Pariah Syndrome: An account of Gypsy Slavery and Persecution.  Ann Arbor: Karoma Publishers, 1987.  Second edition, 1988.  Second printing of second edition, 1990.  Widely reviewed, inc. in the New York Times.

 

A grammar of Carpathian-American (Bašaldo) Romani.  Manchaca: International Romani Union, 1987.

International English Usage.  London: Croom Helm, Ltd., 1986.  In several editions, Including paperback and Japanese translation.  Co-authored with Loreto Todd.  This has been published in the United States by Routledge.

Land of pain: Five centuries of Gypsy slavery.  Austin, 1982.

Grammatical sketch of Louisiana Creole French.  Privately-circulated monograph, Austin, 1977.

Deš terne bališe (Romani-language counting book).  For use in Gypsy school in Chicago.  Austin, 1973.

Me šaj džinav (Romani language primary reader).  For use in Gypsy school in Chicago.  Austin, 1973.

A reference index of the principal motifs occurring in the oral literature of Indians of the British Columbia coast. Vancouver: B.C. Historical Archives Special Publication, 1972.

Place-names of the Pacific North-West derived from Chinook Wawa, with a word-list of the  language.  Vancouver: B C. Historical Archives Special Publication, 1972.

Papia Kristang Dictionary.  S.O.A.S., University of London, 1971.  Privately-circulated  monograph, pp. 43.

Dictionary of Sierra Leone Krio, incorporating obsolete words and expressions found in the  literature, and items peculiar to the dialect of The Gambia. London, 1971. iv + 166.

A Nordlinn grammar and dictionary.  S.O.A.S., London, 1971.  Pp. 85.

Journal Articles

“Origin and Structure of the Lusoasian Creole of Malacca” Revue roumaine de linguistique / Romanian Review of Linguistics, 58 (2009).

“Scots English and the creole relativizer wey,” English World Wide, 28(3):44-50 (2007).

“The Romani Holocaust,” Roma, 46-47:32-57 (1997).

“Our Indian ancestors,” Faces, 13(5):8-13 (1996).

“Breve cronología del holocaust gitano,” i Tchatchipen, 14:18-21, 1996.

“Murro džanglikano baripe sar Rrom,” Džaniben, October, 1996, pp. 27-42.

“American Roma: The hidden Gypsy world,” Aperture, August, 1996, pp. 14-25.

“The roots of Antigypsyism,” Roma, 44/45:4-24 (1996).

“Il Romani di George Borrow,” Thém Romanò, May, 1996, pp. 7-8

“Il cibo e la cultura zingara,” Thém Romanò, July, 1996, pp. 14-15.

“Karing ekh Enciklopedija,” Interface, 23 (1996). 19-page supplement on the Great Romani Encyclopedia project.

“Las consecuencias del racismo antigitano en Europa,” I Tchatchipen, 11:4-9, 1995.

“Maroon languages,” Faces: Journal of the American Museum of Natural History, 11(8):18-26 (1995).

“An anglophone pidgin in Madagascar,” The Carrier Pidgin, 23(2):4 (1995).

“Murro baripe sar Rrom,” Džaniben, 5:17-25 (1995). Prague.

“Alosaripe vaš Rromani standardizime,” Patrin, 2:22-25 (1994). Prešov & Amsterdam.

“On the origin of the word Krio,” The Carrier Pidgin, 21(1):3-4 (1993).

“More on the origin of the word Krio,” The Carrier Pidgin, 21(3):3-5 (1993).

“Kotar-i Rromani historija” and “Kotar-o Rromano aktualipe,” Informaciaqo Lil, 10:10-12 (1993). Warsaw.

“Antigypsyism in the New Europe,” Roma, 38/39:5-29 (1993).

“Hodgeson’s early Romani,” Lacio Drom, 44:23-26 (1993).

“The Hungarian student István Valyi and the Indian connection of Romani,” Lacio Drom, 44:17-23 (1993).

“The function of the Gypsy myth,” Language, Symbolism and Ideology, 5:10-21 (1993).

“Standardization of Romani orthography,” Patrin 3:5-9 (1992) [Amsterdam].

“Informacijaqo lil e Rromane Uniaqoro,” Rrom p-o Drom, May, 1992. P. 2 [Warsaw].

“So si amaro sathemenqo jekhipe,” Rrom p-o Drom, February, 1992. Pp. 2-3 [Warsaw].

“The emergence of a union dialect of American Vlax Romani, and its implications for an international standard,” International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 59:17-30 (1992).

“(A)voiding ordure,” George Borrow Bulletin, 4:17 (1992).

“The roots of inequity: Romani cultural rights in their historical and social context,” in David Mayall (ed.), Gypsies: The forming of Identities and Official Responses (‘Immigrants and Minorities’ 11(2):2-17, 1992).

“The scope of linguistic field surveys,” American Speech 66(1):19-23 (1991).

“The Indian origins of Romani culinary culture,” Roma 36:36-54 (1991).

“The Romani nationalist movement,” Nationalities Papers 19(3):251-268 (1991).

“The Porrajmos (Romani Holocaust),” Nationalities Papers 19(3):373-394 (1991).

“Commentary on Pearson,” Nationalities Papers 19(3):433-435 (1991).

“Phrlále thaj phenjále,” Rrom p-o Drom 3:1-4 (1991).

“Fall of the Romani myth,” Images, August 30th, 1990. Pp. 12-14.

“The etymology of grumetto,” The Carrier Pidgin 18(2):5 (1990).

“Romani foodways: Gypsy culinary culture,” The World & I, June, 1991. Pp. 666-677.

“Die Wurzeln der Ungerechtigkeit: Der Roma in ihrem historischen und sozialen Kontext,” Vierte Welt Aktuelle, July, 1991. Pp. 31-39.

“Die osteuropäischen Warzeln des Roma-Nationalbewusstseins,” Vierte Welt Aktuelle, May, 1991. Pp. 10-17.

Report to the International Federation of Human Rights on the situation of human rights violations directed at the Romani community. Austin and Bucharest: Publication of the International Romani Union, 1990. Pp. 14.

“Gypsies and contemporary racism,” Nokoa 3(2):6-7 (1989).

“The Black Seminoles of Brackettville, Texas,” The World & I, December, 1989. Pp. 676-687.

“The roots of ancient Egyptian civilization,” Nokoa 3(21):1 (1989).

“Nazis and the Greek Roma,” Roma 30:17-20 (1989).

“Gypsies in the United States,” Ethnic Forum 8(2):72-80 (1989).

“The Romani diaspora,” Pt. 1, The World & I, March, 1989, pp. 613-623; Pt. 2, April, 1989, pp. 644-655. Illustr.

“Reunification and the role of the International Romani Union,” Roma 29:9-18 (1988).

“Fate of Hitler’s Romani (Gypsy) victims yet to become part of Holocaust history,” Guest editorial, Detroit Jewish News, Fall, 1988.

“Le stéréotype du gitan,” Etudes Tsiganes 3:19-25 (1988).

“Romani: The language of the Gypsies,” Gamut 23:8-12 (1988).

“Uniqueness of the victims: Gypsies, Jews and the Holocaust,” Without Prejudice: International Review of Racial Discrimination 1(2):45-67 (1988).

“Gypsies in our libraries,” Collection Building 8(4):31-36 (1988).

“Gypsies,” The Encyclopedia of the Ukraine. Toronto, 1987.

“The function of the Gypsy myth,” Roma 27:35-44 (1987).

“The plight of the Romani children,” Action for Children 3(11):1-6 (1987). Main UNICEF periodical. Also in French-language version, “Le sort des enfants Romani,” Action pour les Enfants 2(3):1-5 (1987) and in Roma 28:31-33 (1987).

“Gypsies and Jews in the Nazi Holocaust,” Outlook, May, 1987. Pp. 4-7.

Holocaust memorial address: Romani Day of Remembrance commemoration. The Congressional Record, September 17th, 1987.

“The origin and function of the Gypsy image in children’s literature,” The Lion and the Unicorn: A Critical Journal of Children’s Literature 11(1):47-59 (1987). Special issue on American minorities.

“Gypsies, Jews and the Holocaust,” Shmate: A Journal of Progressive Jewish Thought 17:6-15 (1987).

“The bracelet,” Traveller Education 22:19-21 (1987). (Holocaust memoir)

“Il contributo armeno alla lingua romani,” Lacio Drom 23(1):4-10 (1987) [Rome].

“The cryptolectal speech of the American roads,” American Speech 61(3):206-220 (1986).

“Gypsies: A people forgotten,” The New Zealand Rationalist, April, 1986. Pp. 7-9.

“On the anglophone creole item kekrebu,” American Speech 61(1):48-52 (1986).

“More on poppy show,” American Speech 60(2):189-192 (1985).

“Marko: Stories of my grandfather,” Lacio Drom 21(3/4):53-61 (1985).

“Gypsies: A forgotten minority,” The Humanist 45(5):12-16, 42 (1985).

“Eulogy for Yul Brynner,” Roma 9(2):23-24 (1985).

“Non-Gypsy attitudes towards the Rom,” Roma 7(3):16-24 (1985).

“A structural sketch of Trinidad Creole French,” Amsterdam Creole Studies 8:9-19 (1985).

Translations and annotations of the Krio texts in G. Gilbert, “Hugo Schuchardt and the Atlantic creoles: A newly-discovered manuscript,” American Speech 60(1):31-63 (1985).

“A cross-dialect adoption in American Angloromani,” Newsletter of the North American Chapter of the Gypsy Lore Society 7(2):4 (1984).

“Armenian contributions to the Romani language,” Ararat 2(4):2-6 (1984).

“Slavic influence on Texan Romani,” Journal of the Southwestern Linguistic Society 7(2):115-132 (1984).

“Alchemy among the Gypsies,” Essentia 3(4):13-14 (1982).

“The fate of Gypsy slaves in the West Indies,” Journal of the Gypsy Lore Society 2(1):75-80 (1982).

“The shipment of Gypsies to the Americas,” Roma 6(4):10-21 (1982).

“Wir mussen einmal in alle Deutlichkeit unsere Meinung sagen,” Pogrom: Gesellschafft für bedrohte Völker 12:175-176 (1981).

“Sar jekh dženo,” E Loli Phabaj 1(1):5-6 (1981).

“Gullah and Barbadian: Origins and relationships,” American Speech 55(1):17-35 (1980).

“English in Africa: Emerging standards or diverging regionalisms?,” English World Wide 1(1):31-91 (1980).

“Tribute in memoriam of David DeCamp,” English World Wide 1(1):227-228 (1980).

“Talking back,” Roma 6(1):13-20 (1980).

“Gypsies in Germany,” Michigan Germanic Studies 6(2):247-264 (1980).

“Krio folk-beliefs and dream interpretations,” Journal of Creole Studies 1(1):49-59 (1976).

“Comparative linguistic notes on Parisian and American Kalderash Romani,” Journal of the Gypsy Lore Society 1(2):97-127 (1976).

“Romance vs. reality: Popular notions of the Gypsy,” Roma 2(1):7-23 (1976).

“Malacca Creole Portuguese: Asian, African or European?,” Anthropological Linguistics 17(5):211-236 (1975).

“English in Liberia,” American Speech 49:224-229 (1974)

“Etudes et recherches tsiganes aux Etats-Unis,” Etudes Tsiganes 20(4):51-52, 55 (1974).

“Projet d’êcoles pour des enfants tsiganes,” Etudes Tsiganes 20(5):67-68 (1974).

“Le Rom and’o Tekses,” Roma 1(1):36-44 (1974).

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