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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Cristine H Legare

Assistant Professor Ph.D., University of Michigan

Cristine H Legare

Contact

  • Phone: (512) 232-8044
  • Office: SEA 5.216
  • Office Hours: Monday 4-6 and by appointment
  • Campus Mail Code: A8000

Biography

Dr. Legare is the director of the Cognition, Culture, and Development Lab. Her training and research reflect her commitment to interdisciplinary approaches to the study of cognitive development. As an undergraduate, she took coursework from a variety of social science disciplines, double majoring in Human Development and Cultural Studies at the University of California, San Diego. In graduate school, she participated in the Culture and Cognition Program while completing her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Legare studies the intersection of several topics in the field of cognitive development: causal reasoning, social learning, and the development of scientific and supernatural belief systems. Her approach is to integrate theory and research from cognitive psychology and anthropology to examine basic cognitive processes in particular content areas and cultural contexts. She has done extensive field work in southern Africa, and is currently doing research in Brazil, China, and Vanuatu (a Melanesian archipelago), using both experimental and ethnographic methods.

 

Interests

Cognitive development, cultural learning, cognitive evolution

PSY 333D • Intro To Developmental Psych

44010 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 500pm-630pm NOA 1.124
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Physical, social, and cognitive development in humans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Psychology 333D and Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 6: Introduction to Developmental Psychology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394U • Curr Tpcs In Cognitive Science

44308 • Spring 2014
Meets F 1200pm-300pm SEA 4.244
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Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394S • Fundmntls Of Devel Psychology

43970 • Fall 2013
Meets TH 200pm-500pm SEA 5.106
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Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

PSY 394U • Cognition, Cul, & Development

43655 • Spring 2013
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 1.308
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Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394S • Cog Dev Underpinnings Cul Lrn

43500 • Fall 2012
Meets TH 1100am-200pm SEA 1.332
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Seminars in Developmental Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

 

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43620 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm BUR 108
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Course Description:

The primary goal of this course is to examine the physical, cognitive, social, and

emotional growth of infants, children, and adolescents, and the various factors (e.g.,

genetics, parenting, peer groups, schooling, and the media) that influence development.

Prominent theories of child development and research methods used in developmental

psychology are reviewed. Specific topics that are covered include: aggression,

attachment, gender roles, language development, moral development, cognitive

development, culture, and school achievement. The implications of course content for

child-rearing, education, and social policy will also be discussed.

The course will combine both lecture and seminar formats. I will generally introduce

each topic with some background information and/or lecture on some selected aspect of

each topic, but much of what you learn from the class will be information that you glean

from the readings and class discussions. Active student participation is required.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43780 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.124
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General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Psychology 304 and 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43980 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm NOA 1.124
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Psychology 304  (Unique # 43980)

Introduction to Child Psychology

Fall 2009

 

Instructor:  Dr. Cristine Legare

            Class meets:  Tuesday, Thursday, 3:30-5:00

            Classroom:  NOA 1.124

            Office:  SEA 5.216

            Office hours: Tuesday 2-3, Thursday 2-3, and by appointment 

            Email: legare@psy.utexas.edu

 

Teaching Assistant:  Dorian Colbert                       

            Office: SEA 1.214E

            Office hours: Tuesday 2-3, Thursday 1-2, and by appointment

            Email: dcolbert@mail.utexas.edu

 

Course Description:

 

The primary goal of this course is to examine the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth of infants, children, and adolescents, and the various factors (e.g., genetics, parenting, peer groups, schooling, and the media) that influence development.  Prominent theories of child development and research methods used in developmental psychology are reviewed. Specific topics that are covered include: aggression, attachment, gender roles, language development, moral development, cognitive development, culture, and school achievement.  The implications of course content for child-rearing, education, and social policy will also be discussed.

 

The course will combine both lecture and seminar formats.  I will generally introduce each topic with some background information and/or lecture on some selected aspect of each topic, but much of what you learn from the class will be information that you glean from the readings and class discussions.  Active student participation is required.

 

Text:

 

1)  Siegler, R., DeLoache, J., & Eisenberg, N. (2006).  How children develop (2nd ed.). New

York, NY:  Worth Publishers.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1. To introduce you to the field of child psychology.
  2. To provide you with the skills and information necessary to be a critical consumer of information.
  3. To excite you about the process of scientific discovery.
  4. To help you apply research in child psychology to real world concerns and your own experiences.

 

Course Requirements:

 

Prerequisites:

Please note that the Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the following prerequisites:

(a)  Completion of Psy 301 (Introductory Psychology)

(b)  Received at least a grade of C in Psy 301

 

Grading Policy and Requirements:

 

EXAMS:  Four examinations will be given during the semester.  The last of the four exams will be given during the final week of the course. Your cumulative exam grade will be the best 3 of the 4 grades.  The top three test scores will contribute equally toward the final grade, (i.e., each student's lowest exam score will be dropped). No make-up exams will be given for missed exams (a missed exam will count as your lowest grade, including the final exam).  All exams will be multiple-choice in format.  All course material is fair game for the exams.  This includes all of the information in the textbook, the lectures, and any films presented during lecture.  The exams will assess both conceptual knowledge and factual information, so be prepared to answer both kinds of questions.  The exams will not be comprehensive, (i.e., they will cover only that material assigned after the previous exam). Each will consist of 50 multiple-choice problems and thus, the total number of exam points it is possible to earn is 150. Dates of the exams are September 17, October 6, November 3, and December 3.  Review session will be held for each exam. There will be no exam during finals week.

 

 

WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:  Students are required to complete EITHER the INTERVIEW PROJECT OR THE MEDIA PROJECT (5 pages, 50 points each).  Projects are designed to provide hands-on experience both in collecting and presenting new data and in critiquing existing findings.  Your final project is due November 12th.  You are required to turn in your interview or coding sheet with your paper.  Five points (out of 50 total) will be given to project drafts brought in for feedback during office hours starting 6 weeks before the project is due.  A sign-up sheet will be distributed in class in early October. You must bring your project draft in person to office hours, emailing drafts is not sufficient to earn these 5 points.

 

The total number of points that it is possible to earn for the semester is 200.   Grades are a reflection of what you have earned and the course is not curved. 

A  =  93-100

A- =  90-92

B+ =  87-89

B   =  83-86

B- =  80-82

C+ = 79-77

C   = 73-76

C- =  70-72

D+ =  69-67

D   =  63-66

D- =  60-62

F   =  below 60

 

Incomplete grades will be given in extremely rare and extraordinary circumstances.  Students are expected to plan ahead in starting assignments and to keep up with the coursework throughout the term.  Any unusual circumstances that may impede a student’s progress in the course should be discussed with the instructors in a timely manner.

 

Assignment                                                                        Percentage of grade

Writing assignments:

Interview Project OR Media Project                                                25

Exams (Highest 3 out of 4 exam scores)                                                75

Total                                                                                                           100

Class Participation, Preparation, and Communication:

 

The bulk of class time will be devoted to introducing you to the study of child psychology, discussing the readings, and critically evaluating course material.  I highly encourage active class participation and reading the course material in advance.  Please take the opportunity to attend office hours as well, they allow for more in depth conversations about course material than is possible during lecture.  If you cannot attend scheduled office hours, contact us to schedule an appointment.

 

Email communication is also encouraged.  Please do treat email as a professional, formal means of communication and allow at least 1-2 days for an email response.

 

 

Course Policy:

Lectures will include material that is not in the textbook.  If you miss a class, it will be your responsibility to find out from a classmate what happened in class (including handouts, assigned readings, announcements, and lecture content).  Also, if your paper is turned in late, your paper will be marked down 10% (5 points) per day after the due date, unless there are compelling circumstances.

 

Notes:

1.  The University of Texas at Austin provides upon request appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, contact the Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259, 471-4641 TTY.

2.  Academic integrity is an integral part of the educational process. Please read the information about academic integrity on this website: http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/sjs/acint_student.php

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary penalties.

 

Psychology 304

Course Outline

DaTE

TOPIC

CHAPTER

 

8/27

Introduction: What is child psychology? 

1

 

9/1

Prenatal development

2

 

9/3

The newborn

 

 

9/8

Biology and behavior  

3

dominguez lecture on brain development

9/10

Genes and teratogens

 

 

9/15

Cognitive development

4

 

9/17

EXAM 1

 

 

9/22

Infant cognition

5

 

9/24

Language development and symbol use

6

COLBERT LEcture on language

9/29

Conceptual development

7

 

10/1

Intelligence and academic achievement

8

 

10/6

EXAM 2

 

 

10/8

Social development

9

 

10/13

Emotional development

10

 

10/15

Attachment and development of self

11

 

10/20

The family

12

 

10/22

Parenting

 

NEFF LECTURE ON dIVORCE

10/27

Parenting

 

 

10/29

Daycare

 

 

11/3

EXAM 3

 

 

11/5

Peer relationships

13

 

11/10

Peer relationships

 

 

11/12

Moral development PROJECT DUE

14

 

11/17

Gender development

15

 

11/19

Television and media

 

 

11/24

Adolescence

 

pasch lectue on adolescent health

11/26

Thanksgiving holiday-no class

 

 

12/1

Conclusions

16

 

12/3

EXAM 4

 

 

 

PSY 304 • Intro To Child Psychology

43020 • Spring 2009
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm WAG 101
show description

General introduction to physical, social, and cognitive development from conception onward. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.  Psychology 304 an 333D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C.

Representative Publications

 (See lab site for a full list of publications)

Legare, C.H., & Souza, A. (2014, in press). Searching for control: Priming randomness increases the evaluation of ritual efficacy. Cognitive Science

Watson-Jones, R.E., Legare, C.H., Whitehouse, H., & Clegg, J.M. (2014, in press). Task-specific effects of ostracism on imitative fidelity in early childhood. Evolution and Human Behavior

Herrmann, P.A., Legare, C.H., Harris, P.L., & Whitehouse, H. (2013). Stick to the script: The effect of witnessing multiple actors on children’s imitation. Cognition

Legare, C.H., Lane, J., & Evans, E.M. (2013). Anthropomorphizing science: How does it affect the development of evolutionary concepts? Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 59, 168-197.

Legare, C.H., & Souza, A. (2012). Evaluating ritual efficacy: Evidence from the supernatural. Cognition, 124, 1-15.

Legare, C.H., Mills, C.M., Souza, A.L., Plummer, L.E., & Yasskin, R. (2012). The use of questions as problem-solving strategies in early childhood. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 114, 63-76.

Legare, C.H., Evans, E.M., Rosengren, K.S., & Harris, P.L. (2012). The coexistence of natural and supernatural explanations across cultures and development. Child Development, 83, 779-793. 

Legare, C.H. (2012). Exploring explanation: Explaining inconsistent information guides hypothesis-testing behavior in young children. Child Development, 83, 173-185. 

Gelman, S.A., & Legare, C.H. (2011). Concepts and folk theories. Annual Review of Anthropology, 40, 379-398. 

Legare, C.H., Gelman, S.A., & Wellman, H.M. (2010). Inconsistency with prior knowledge triggers children’s causal explanatory reasoning. Child Development, 81, 929-944.

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