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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Kim Fromme

Professor Ph.D., University of Washington

Kim Fromme

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Biography

Dr. Fromme plans to accept a graduate student to her laboratory in the Fall of 2015.

Kim Fromme, Ph.D., is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and is also the Director of the Studies on Alcohol, Health, and Risky Activities (SAHARA) Laboratory. She received her Ph.D. from The University of Washington, and is a Fellow and former President of the Society of Addiction Psychologists (Division 50) of the American Psychological Association.

Her program of research focuses on the etiology and prevention of alcohol abuse and risk-taking behaviors among adolescents and young adults. With support from a $2.3 million grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Dr. Fromme recently launched the Genes and New Experiences Study (GENES). This project includes the collection of DNA and survey data from 1,060 participants who previously participated in the "UT Experience!" which was a 6-year longitudinal study of first time college students. For this project, Dr. Fromme and the GENES team will be examining 5 candidate genes in relation to individual differences in alcohol response, externalizing personality traits, and trajectories of alcohol use. For more information, visit www.utgenes.org.

Dr. Fromme also conducts alcohol challenge studies in her bar laboratory, which is one of seven simulated barroom facilities in the U.S. These studies include tests of the effects of alcohol intoxication on decision-making processes and impulsive behavior, as well as individual differences in alcohol response. As part of the GENES project, over 400 participants will be invited to complete an alcohol challenge session in the SAHARA bar laboratory over the next few years.

Findings from these studies will be used to develop and evaluate new approaches to the prevention of alcohol abuse and involvement in other potentially hazardous behaviors.

Representative Recent Publications

Quinn, P.D., & Fromme, K. (in press). Event-level associations between objective and subjective alcohol intoxication and driving after drinking across the college years. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

 Brister, H.A., Sher, K., & Fromme, K. (2011). 21st Birthday drinking and associated physical consequences and behavioral risks,Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 25, 573-582.

Quinn, P.D., Stappenbeck, C.A., & Fromme, K. (2011). Collegiate heavy drinking prospectively predicts change in sensation seeking and impulsivity. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 120, 543-556.

Quinn, P.D., & Fromme, K. (2011).  Subjective response to alcohol challenge: A quantitative review. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 35, 1-12.

Corbin, W.R., Iwamoto, D.K., & Fromme, K. (2011). A comprehensive longitudinal test of the acquired preparedness model for alcohol use and related problems. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 72, 602-610.

Hatzenbuehler, M.L, Corbin, W.R. & Fromme, K. (2011). Discrimination and alcohol-related  problems in college students: A prospective examination of mediating effects. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 3, 213-220.

Quinn, P.D. & Fromme, K(2011).  Alcohol use and related problems among college  students and their non-college peers: The competing roles of personality and peer influence. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 72, 622-632.

Quinn, P.D. & Fromme, K. (2011). The role of person-environment interactions in increased  alcohol use in the transition to college. Addiction, 106, 1104-1113.

Wetherill, R.R. & Fromme, K. (2011). Acute alcohol effects on narrative recall and contextual memory: An examination of fragmentary blackouts. Addictive Behaviors, 36, 886-889.

Quinn, P.D. & Fromme, K. (2011). Predictors and outcomes of variability in subjective alcohol intoxication among college students: An event-level analysis across four years. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 35, 484-495.

Corbin, W.R., Iwamoto, D., & Fromme, K. (2011). Broad social motives, alcohol use, and related problems: Mechanisms of risk from high school through college. Addictive Behaviors, 36,  222-230.

Iwamoto, D., Corbin, W.R., & Fromme, K. (2010). Trajectory classes of heavy episodic drinking among Asian American college students. Addiction, 105:1912-1920.

Quinn, P.D. & Fromme, K. (2010). Self-regulation as a protective factor against risky drinking and sexual behavior. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 24, 376-385. PMCID: PMC2947344.

Fromme, K, Wetherill, R.R., and Neal, D.J. (2010). Turning 21 and the associated drinking and driving after drinking among college students. Journal of American College Health, 59, 1-6.

Stappenbeck, C.A. & Fromme, K. (2010). A longitudinal investigation of alcohol use and physical dating violence in men and women. Addictive Behaviors, 35, 479-485.

Interests

Etiology and prevention of alcohol abuse and risk-taking behaviors (e.g., drugs, sex, aggression)

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

43800 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.126
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Biological and social factors in the development and treatment of psychopathology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

43350 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.126
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Your overall grade will be based on three exam scores. Exams I and III will each count 30% of your overall grade and Exam II will count 40%. Questions about the grading of an exam must be raised during office hours in the week immediately following receipt of that grade. Scores of 93-100 = A, 90-92 = A-; 87-89 = B+; 83-86 = B; 80-82 = B-; 77-79 = C+; 73-76 = C; 70-72 = C-; 67-69 = D+; 63-66 = D; 60-62 = D-; less than 60 = F. Under no circumstances will additional points be given (even if you are just below a cut-off point).

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

43230 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.126
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A total of three (3) exams will be given during the regular semester and an optional, cumulative final exam will be offered during the final exam period. Each exam will be worth 100 points and will consist of multiple choice, matching, or true/false questions. Each of the 3 regular exams will cover all of the readings assigned and all the lecture and film materials presented since the previous exam. The optional final exam will include material that is covered throughout the semester. Approximately half of all exam questions will be taken from lecture and films and half from the text. Exams will not be returned, but you may review your exam during the TA or Professor’s office hours. Please notify the TA in advance, so we can locate your exam.

PSY 389L • Theory & Tech Of Assessment II

43910 • Spring 2011
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 3.130B
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Clinical interviewing with adults and children. Observation and feedback for test administration and clinical skills. Three lecture hours and three hours of observation a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Psychology 389K, and consent of instructor received prior to registering.

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

43190 • Fall 2010
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm NOA 1.126
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Prerequisites

Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, Psychology 418 or an equivalent statistics course with a grade of at least C, and upper division standing.

Course Description

This course takes a multidimensional approach to understanding psychological disorders. Within the constraints of a large lecture course, I invite questions and discussion, use demonstrations, and provide case examples to bring to life the range of psychological disorders people experience. In addition to learning about these disorders and their treatment, I hope students will empathize with the people who suffer from them. I encourage students to apply rather than simply memorize what they learn, and to be active participants rather than passive recipients in the classroom.

Grading Policy

Exams: 3, objective (multiple choice and true/false) There is now an optional comprehensive final exam that can be used to replace any missed exam or can be used to replace the student's lowest exam grade. Because of the optional final, there are no make up exams (for the first 3 regular exams) given under any circumstances.

Texts

Final determination of text is pending.

PSY 389L • Theory & Tech Of Assessment II

44070 • Spring 2010
Meets W 100pm-400pm SEA 3.130B
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Clinical interviewing with adults and children. Observation and feedback for test administration and clinical skills. Three lecture hours and three hours of observation a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Psychology 389K, and consent of instructor received prior to registering.

PSY 352 • Abnormal Psychology

44175 • Fall 2009
Meets MWF 1100-1200 NOA 1.126
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            ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY, PSY 352

            Fall 2009; MWF 11 a.m.; NOA 1.126

 

PROFESSOR:  Dr. K. Fromme

            Office, phone, and email: 3.242 Seay Bldg.; 471-0039; fromme@psy.utexas.edu (please note that it is against UT regulations to discuss grades via phone or email)

            Office hours: MWF 10 - 10:50 a.m.

 

TEACHING ASSISTANT:  Rachel Berman

            Office and email: 2.318 Seay Bldg; rachel.berman@mail.utexas.edu

            Office hours:  Tuesdays 2-5 pm

 

TEXT: Durand, V.M. & Barlow, D.H. (2005).  Essentials of Abnormal Psychology. 5th Edition. Thompson

[NOTE: This text differs from Barlow & Durand, Abnormal Psychology]. 

 

 

PREREQUISITES: The Psychology Dept. will drop students who do not meet the following prerequisites: (1) PSY 301 and PSY 418 (or equivalent listed in course schedule) with a C or better, and (2) upper division standing (60 hours completed).  Dropped students will be notified by the 12th class day.

 

 

EXAMS:  A total of three (3) exams will be given during the regular semester and an optional, cumulative final exam will be offered during the final exam period.  Each exam will be worth 100 points and will consist of multiple choice, matching, or true/false questions.  Each of the 3 regular exams will cover all of the readings assigned and all the lecture and film materials presented since the previous exam. The optional final exam will include material that is covered throughout the semester. Approximately half of all exam questions will be taken from lecture and films and half from the text.  Exams will not be returned, but you may review your exam during the TA or Professor’s office hours. Please notify the TA in advance, so we can locate your exam.  

 

            No makeup exams will be given.  Absolutely NO EXCEPTIONS will be made under any circumstances (really!). The optional final exam can be substituted for one missed regular exam or used to replace your lowest regular exam grade. See additional information about the final exam in the last paragraph on the back of this syllabus.

 

 

            GRADING: Your overall grade will be based on three exam scores.  Exams I and III will each count 30% of your overall grade and Exam II will count 40%. Questions about the grading of an exam must be raised during office hours in the week immediately following receipt of that grade. UT has switched to the plus/minus system: Scores of 93-100 = A+, 90-92 = A-; 87-89 = B+; 83-86 = B; 80-82 = B-; 77-79 = C+; 73-76 = C; 70-72 = C-; 67-69 = D+; 63-66 = D; 60-62 = D-; Less than 60 = F.  Under no circumstances will additional points be given (e.g., if you are just below a cut-off point). 

 

 

DROPPING:  Any time before taking the first midterm you may drop the course with a Q grade.  After that time you may drop with a Q only if your performance up to that time is C or better; otherwise you drop with a grade of F.

 

 

DISABILITIES:  Upon request, UT Austin provides appropriate academic accommodations for qualified students with disabilities (contact: Office of the Dean of Students at 471-6259; 471-4641 TTY). If special accommodations are needed for exams, the student must notify the TA at least two weeks before the exam and provide documentation from the Dean of Students’ Office.

 

 

TIPS FOR EARNING YOUR BEST GRADE:

            a) Keep up with the readings - not all exam material will be covered during lecture.

            b) Come to class - some exam material will only be covered in class.

            c) If you need help, don't wait until exam time - use office hours!


SCHEDULE OF WEEKLY TOPICS AND READINGS

 

 

DATE                                     TOPIC                                                                        WEEKLY READINGS

 

August 26 & 28            What is abnormal behavior?

                                    An historical context                                                            Chapter  1

 

Aug. 31 - Sept. 4            Current approaches & Intro to assessment                         Chapter  2

 

Sept. 7                                    Labor Day Holiday

Sept. 9& 11                        Clinical assessment and diagnosis                                    Chapter  3, pages 71-92

 

Sept. 14-18                        Treatment effectiveness and research                         Chapter  3, pages 92-113

                                    Methods                                                                        Chapter 14, pages 576-579

 

Sept. 21 & 23                        Physical disorders and health psychology                        Chapter  7

Sept. 25                        Exam I

 

 

Sept. 28 – Oct. 2            Anxiety disorders                                                            Chapter  4

 

Oct. 5-9                        Substance-related and impulse-control disorders            Chapter 10

 

Oct. 12-16                        Sexual and gender identity disorders                                    Chapter  9

 

Oct. 19-23                        Mood disorders                                                            Chapter  6

 

Oct.26-30            Developmental and cognitive disorders                        Chapter 13

 

Nov. 2            Exam II

Nov 4 & 6                        Eating and sleep disorders                                                Chapter  8

 

Nov. 9-13               Personality disorders                                                            Chapter 11

 

Nov. 16- 20                        Somatoform & dissociative disorders                                    Chapter  5 

 

Nov. 23 & 25                        Schizophrenia            and other psychotic disorders                        Chapter 12

Nov. 27                        Thanksgiving Holiday

                              

Dec. 30 & Dec. 5            Legal and ethical issues                                                Chapter 14

Dec. 4                                    Exam III

 

 

OPTIONAL FINAL EXAM: This cumulative final exam will be held on Wednesday, December 9th at 7 pmNo early final exams will be given and late exams will be given only in cases of medical, psychiatric, or family emergencies (documented in writing in advance of the final exam make up). 

PSY 389L • Theory & Tech Of Assessment II

43320 • Spring 2009
Meets W 1200-300pm SEA 3.130B
show description

Observation and feedback of test administration, clinical skills, and report writing; discussion of ethical issues pertaining to clinical interviewing and testing. Three lecture hours and three hours of observation a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Psychology 389K.

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