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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Jennifer Beer

Associate Professor Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

Jennifer Beer

Contact

Biography

Dr. Beer is an Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. She is affiliated with the Psychology Department (Social & Personality Area, Cognitive Systems Area), the Imaging Research Center, and the Institute for Neuroscience.

"Research in our lab focuses on self-processes, emotion processes and social cognition. We're interested in how these processes contribute to appropriate social functioning. For example, how do self-perceptions and emotions influence decisions in social interactions? To address these questions, we use behavioral methods such as behavioral observation (e.g., FACS coding, reaction times, self and peer-report) in addition to neuroscience methods such as neuroimaging (fMRI) and studies of patient populations."

Interests

Social neuroscience, self, emotion, and social cognition

PSY 394U • Curr Tpcs In Cognitiv Neurosci

43965 • Fall 2014
Meets F 1200pm-300pm SEA 3.250
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Seminars in Cognitive or Perceptual Systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Psychology Of Literature

44075 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.124
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Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394V • Social Neuroscience

44365 • Spring 2014
Meets T 1100am-200pm SEA 3.430
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Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Emotion

43755 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.124
show description

Topics of contemporary interest that may vary from semester to semester. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Electrical Engineering 351K, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, 362K, Mechanical Engineering 335, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309, Statistics and Scientific Computation 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 318.

PSY 394V • Curr Tpcs In Social-Pers Psy

43708 • Spring 2013
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 1.332
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Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341K • Emotion

43305 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm CPE 2.216
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This is a one-semester course designed to examine and evaluate the scientific literature on the psychology of human emotion. The course addresses a variety of questions to this end and draws on the perspective of both psychology and neuroscience.

What are emotions, anyway? Are they inherently related to facial expressions, to physiological processes, gestures, and other forms of behavior? What causes them to occur at a particular time and place? Are emotions inherently adaptive or maladaptive? Why is it difficult to concentrate when we are angry, disappointed, falling in love, grieving over loss, jealous or frightened? Why are emotions difficult to control? How are emotions related to psychopathology? Do different cultures have different emotions, express emotions differently or have different ways of talking and thinking about them? Do emotions change with psychological development? Are there sex/gender differences in emotion? What are the neurobiological bases of emotion?

PSY 394V • Social Neuroscience

44070 • Spring 2011
Meets T 200pm-500pm SEA 5.106
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Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341k • Emotion

43140 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm NOA 1.124
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Course Description

This is a one-semester course designed to examine and evaluate the scientific literature on the psychology of human emotion. The course addresses a variety of questions to this end and draws on the perspective of both psychology and neuroscience.

What are emotions, anyway? Are they inherently related to facial expressions, to physiological processes, gestures, and other forms of behavior? What causes them to occur at a particular time and place? Are emotions inherently adaptive or maladaptive? Why is it difficult to concentrate when we are angry, disappointed, falling in love, grieving over loss, jealous or frightened? Why are emotions difficult to control? How are emotions related to psychopathology? Do different cultures have different emotions, express emotions differently or have different ways of talking and thinking about them? Do emotions change with psychological development? Are there sex/gender differences in emotion? What are the neurobiological bases of emotion?

Grading Policy

Grades are based on 3 midterm exams, a class project, and a take-home final exam.

Texts

None.

PSY 394V • Smnr In Socl & Personality Psy

43410 • Fall 2010
Meets W 400pm-700pm SEA 1.332
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394V • Emotion Regulation

44200 • Spring 2010
Meets T 200pm-500pm SEA 5.106
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Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 394V • Neural Sys Of Decision-Making

44208 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 330pm-500pm SEA 3.430B
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PSY 341k • Emotion

44115 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1230pm NOA 1.126
show description

Course Description

This is a one-semester course designed to examine and evaluate the scientific literature on the psychology of human emotion. The course addresses a variety of questions to this end and draws on the perspective of both psychology and neuroscience.

What are emotions, anyway? Are they inherently related to facial expressions, to physiological processes, gestures, and other forms of behavior? What causes them to occur at a particular time and place? Are emotions inherently adaptive or maladaptive? Why is it difficult to concentrate when we are angry, disappointed, falling in love, grieving over loss, jealous or frightened? Why are emotions difficult to control? How are emotions related to psychopathology? Do different cultures have different emotions, express emotions differently or have different ways of talking and thinking about them? Do emotions change with psychological development? Are there sex/gender differences in emotion? What are the neurobiological bases of emotion?

Grading Policy

Grades are based on 3 midterm exams, a class project, and a take-home final exam.

Texts

None.

PSY 394V • Social Neuroscience

43470 • Spring 2009
Meets T 200pm-500pm SEA 5.106
show description

Seminars in Social and Personality Psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Selected Publications

Beer, J.S., Lombardo, M. V., & Bhanji, J. P. (in press). Roles of medial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex in self-evaluation. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

Beer, J.S., & Hughes, B. L. (2010). Neural systems of social comparison and the ?above average? effect. NeuroImage, 49, 2671-2679.

Harmon-Jones, E. & Beer, J.S. (2009). Methods in Social Neuroscience. New York: Guilford Press.

Beer, J.S., & Lombardo, M. V. (in press). Patient and neuroimaging methodologies in the study of personality and social processes. To appear in R. W. Robins, R.C. Fraley, & R. Krueger (Eds.)The Handbook of Research Methods in Personality Psychology. New York: Guilford.

Beer, J. S. (2007). The default self: Feeling good or being right? Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 11, 187-189.

Quirk, G., & Beer, J.S. (2006). Prefrontal Involvement in Emotion Regulation: Convergence of Rat and Human Studies. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 16, 723-727.

Beer, J.S., John, O.P., Scabini, D., & Knight, R.T. (2006). Orbitofrontal Cortex and Social Behavior: Integrating Self-Monitoring and Emotion-Cognition Interactions. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 18, 871-880.

Beer, J.S., Knight, R.T., & D‚Esposito, M. (2006). Integrating Emotion and Cognition: The role of the frontal lobes in distinguishing between helpful and hurtful emotion. Psychological Science, 17, 448-453.

Beer, J. S., & Ochsner, K. N. (2006). Social cognition: A Multi Level Analyses. Brain Research, 1079, 98-105.

Ochsner, K.N., Beer, J.S., Robertson, E.A., Cooper, J., Gabrieli, J. D. E., Kihlstrom, J. F., & D‚ Esposito, M. (2005). The neural correlates of direct and reflected self-knowledge. Neuroimage, 28, 797-814.

Beer, J. S., Shimamura, A. P., & Knight, R. T. (2004). Frontal lobe contributions to executive control of cognitive and social behavior. In M. S. Gazzaniga (Ed.) The Newest Cognitive Neurosciences (3rd Edition) (pp.1091-1104). Cambridge: MIT Press.

Beer, J.S., Heerey, E. H., Keltner, D., Scabini, D., & Knight, R. T. (2003). The regulatory function of self-conscious emotion: Insights from patients with orbitofrontal damage. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85, 594-604.

Beer, J. S. (2002). Implicit self-theories and shyness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 83, 1009-1024.

Robins, R. W., & Beer, J. S. (2001). Positive illusions about the self: Short-term benefits and long-term costs. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 340-352.

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