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James W. Pennebaker, Chair The University of Texas at Austin, SEA 4.212, Austin, TX 78712 • (512) 475-7596

Peter F Macneilage

Professor Emeritus Ph.D., McGill University

Peter F Macneilage

Contact

Biography

My main research interest is in the evolution of complex action systems. In the context of the history of thought this has been a neglected topic, and this remains the case in modern cognitive science. It has been primarily concerned with apprehension of the world and with mental operations, rather than with the role of action on the world, which is central from a Darwinian perspective. I have developed a theory of the evolution of handedness and a theory of the evolution of speech (see references below) in an attempt to help remedy this neglect. According to the handedness theory, the original specialization of the left hemisphere of the brain in primates was for body postural control, complementary to a left hand - right hemisphere specialization for predation in prosimians. It is proposed that left hemisphere specialization for both right handedness in higher primates and speech in humans derived from this initial postural specialization. It is also proposed that the mouth open-close alteration which provides the "frame" for syllables evolved from ingestive cyclicities such as chewing via an intermediate stage of visuofacial communicative cyclicities, such as lipsmacks, which are common in other higher primates. My research program primarily consists of ethological studies of acquisition of speech in the hope that speech ontogeny will throw light on phylogeny.

Read about The Origin of Speech

Interests

psycholinguistics, dynamics of speech articulation, neuropsychology of language, and comparative neurobiology of complex action systems (vocal and manual)

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42980 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am NOA 1.124
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Prerequisites

A passing score on the reading section of the TASP test.

Course Description

A brief introduction to the main subdisciplines of Psychology with an emphasis on evolutionary explanations of psychological phenomena, and on brain processes underlying behavior.

Course Requirements

All Psychology 301 students must complete a research requirement by either participating in experimental sessions within the Psychology Dept. or by writing a research paper.

Grading Policy

Grades will be based on two 75 minute multiple choice tests during the semester and one 75 minute multiple choice test at final exam time.

Texts

Psychological Science by Gazzaniga & Heatherton, 2nd Edition, 2005

PSY 337 • Psychology Of Language

43125 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am NOA 1.124
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Prerequisites

PREREQ: FOR PSY MAJS, PSY 301 & 418 WITH GRADE AT LEAST C IN EACH; FOR NONMAJS, PSY 301 WITH GRADE AT LEAST C, & 1 OF FOLLOWING WITH GRADE AT LEAST C: BIO 318M, C E 311S, ECO 329, EDP 371, GOV 350K, KIN 373, M 316, PSY 317, SOC 317L, S W 318, STA 309.

Course Description

Scientific studies of production, comprehension of language; learning of these abilities. Strong biological orientation; detailed consideration of evolution of language, relation between language and brain function.

Grading Policy

Exams: Two 75 minute exams during the semester. 2/3rds of the grade.
Final: 75 minutes. 1/3 of the grade.

Exams consist of multiple choice and short answer questions, and at least one essay.

Texts

The Origin of Speech by MacNeilage

A note packet and additional readings will be available by the first class day.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43750 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.124
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Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 337 • Psychology Of Language

43885 • Spring 2010
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
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Consideration of approaches to the study of language, its development in children, and its functioning; important research from psychology and linguistics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-division standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychology 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

43920 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 800-930 NOA 1.124
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                                                                                                                                                    Psychology 301 Introduction to Psychology

 

Dr MacNeilage

T.T 8-9.30  Unique # 43920                                                                                    Fall 2009

 

Professor: Peter MacNeilage

3.230 Seay

Ph: W: 475-7009  H: 479-6720

e-mail: macneilage@psy.utexas.edu

Office Hours: T T 11-12

 

TA:Mitzi Gonzales

4.110e Seay

e-mail mitzi2020@gmail.com

Office Hours: TT 9.30 – 11.00

                                                                                               

Course Requirements

 

            There are two sets of course requirements.  The first is requirements for getting a grade.  The second is participation in ongoing experiments in the department, or writing a paper, without which you cannot get a final grade. The latter requirement will be discussed in class.

 

Grade Requirements.

            Your grade will be based on the results of 2, 75 minute, 75 question,  multiple choice exams, one on October 16, testing the first half of the semester, and the other on Saturday Dec. 12 from 9 to 10.15, testing the second half of the semester. Thus the maximum score for the course will be 150—one point per question. Each of the 2 exams will be worth 1/2 of the grade.  There are practice multiple choice questions in the textbook. No reasons for missing exams will be accepted if you did not contact me before exam time.  Now you know the exam times, nonrefundable air fares can not be used as an excuse for absence from exams.

Class attendance is compulsory.  You can miss 2 classes during the semester without penalty.  After that, marks will be deducted in the following way: 3 classes missed, 4 points deducted; 4 classes missed, 8 points deducted: 5 classes missed, 16 points deducted; 6 classes missed, 32 points deducted; 7 classes missed, 68 points deducted; 8 classes missed, course failed. After the first class day, attendence will be taken by the TA at the South Door.

 

Grades:

Here is how the course grade will be determined.  The number of points that you make on each of the two exams will be added together to give you a sum for the course. (Note that you will not receive a letter grade during the semester but simply a score, which is the number of points.) At the end of the course, marks lost for missing classes will be deducted.  Then your letter grade will be assigned according to a simple formula based on a. your sum, and b. the average of the scores of the top 3 students in the class.  This average of the three greatest sums will be considered a perfect score of 100% and is the basis for all the other grades.

If your sum is;              Then your grade is;

86-100%                               A

71-85%                                B

61-70%                                C

51-60%                                D

50% or below                       F

Notice that anything can happen.  Its possible (but not likely) for everyone to get an A.  In this course you are not graded on some absolute or arbitrary scale, but in relation to the three best members of your class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psychology 301 Introduction to Psychology

Dr MacNeilage

                                                                        Fall 2009

 

Textbook: M.S. Gazzaniga and T.S. Heatherton Psychological Science.  New York, Norton, 2nd Edition, 2006

Approximate Lecture Schedule and Readings

(Note that Chapter 2 and certain sections of other chapters, to be announced, will not be required.)

Aug 28. Ch. 1 Introduction to Psychological Science

Sept 2, 4 Ch 1 Cont. 

Sept 9, 11. Ch. 3 Genetic and Biological Foundations

Sept 16, 18.  Ch 4. The Brain and Consciousness

Sept 23, 25.  Ch. 5. Sensation, Attention and Perception

Sept 30, Oct 2.  Ch 6. Learning and Reward

Oct 7, 9.  Ch 7. Memory

Oct 14.  Ch 8 Thinking and Intelligence

 

Oct 16. Mid-Semester Exam

 

Oct 21 Ch 8 Cont.

Oct 23, 28 Ch 9. Motivation

Oct 30, Nov 4.  Ch 10. Emotions and Health

Nov 6, 11.  Ch 11. Human Development

Nov 13, 18 Personality

Nov 20, 25. Disorders of Mind and Body

 

Nov 27  THANKSGIVING

 

Dec 2. Treating Disorders of Mind and Body

Dec 4. Social Psychology

 

 

 

 

 

PSY 337 • Psychology Of Language

44090 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 NOA 1.124
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Psychology 337: Fall, 2009  Course Information

Unique # 44090

Professor: Peter MacNeilage

3.230 Seay

Ph: W: 475-7009  H: 479-6720

e-mail: macneilage@psy.utexas.edu

Office Hours: TT 11-12

 

TA: Elizabeth Pommier

2.122 Seay

e-mail: Elizabeth.Pommier@mail.utexas.edu

Office Hours: T 11-12:30 & TH 1:30 – 3:00

 

Course Requirements

 

             Your grade will be based on the results of 2, 75 minute tests, one on October15, and the other on Friday Dec. 11 from 9 to 10.15.  Each of the two tests during the semester will consist of 20 multiple choice questions 5 short paragraphs (choice of 7), and 2 essays (choice of 3). No reasons for missing exams will be accepted if you did not contact me before exam time. Work: 475-7009; Home: 479 6720; e-mail: macneilage@psy.utexas.edu (No problems arising from non-refundable air fares will be considered as all exam times are now known to you.) Grades cannot be improved by extra assignments.

 

Grades.

Here is how grades will be determined.  The number of points that you make on each of the two exams will be added together to give you a sum for the course.  The highest possible number of points is 200—1 point per minute of testing. (Note that you will not receive a letter grade during the semester but simply a score, which is the number of points.)  Your letter grade will be assigned according to a simple formula based on a. your sum, and b. the average of the scores of the top 2 students in the class.  This average of the two greatest sums will be considered a perfect score of 100% and is the basis for all the other grades.

If your sum is;              Then your grade is;

86-100%                               A

76-85%                                B

61-75%                                C

51-60%                                D

50% or below                       F

Notice that anything can happen.  Its possible (but not likely) for everyone to get an A.  In this course you are not graded on some absolute or arbitrary scale, but in relation to the two best members of your class. After the 2 tests,  class attendance/participation will be factored in and your final grade will again be computed in relation to the top two scores in the class as above.

Attendance.

Class attendance will be compulsory.  You can miss 2 classes during the semester without penalty.  After that, marks will be deducted in the following way: 3 classes missed, 4 points deducted; 4 classes missed, 8 points deducted: 5 classes missed, 16 points deducted; 6 classes missed, 32 points deducted; 7 classes missed, 68 points deducted; 8 classes missed, course failed.  After the first day, class attendance will be taken by the TA at the South door of the room,

 

Departmental Requirements

The Psychology Department will drop all students who do not meet the

following prerequisites:

(a)  PSY 301 with a C or better

(b)  Upper-Division standing (60 hours completed)

(c)  PSY 418 (or an equivalent listed in the course schedule) with a C or better

 

Accommodations

At the beginning of the semester, students with disabilities who need special accommodations should notify the instructor by presenting a letter prepared by the Services for Students with Special Disabilities (SSD) Office.  To ensure that the most appropriate accommodations can be provided, students should contact the SSD Office at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY.

 

Adding Classes

The only way undergraduates can add a PSY class is through the ROSE registration system by Aug. 31st.   If the class has an electronic waitlist started in the registration system students must add themselves to it for any chance to add the class.  If a class is full, students can keep trying during their access times and speak to their advisors (in their major departments) to explore other options in case it does not open up.  Feel free to forward email inquiries about adding a class to undergrad@psy.utexas.edu to answer. Dean's offices typically will not allow adds past Sept.11th, when official roll is taken.

 

Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty

Students who violate University rules on scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary procedures, including the possibility of failure in the course and/or dismissal from The University.  Since such dishonesty harms the individual, all students, and the integrity of the University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced. 

 

 

                                    Psychology 337:  Psychology of Language 44090

Dr. MacNeilage  Fall ‘09

MWF 2-3 NOA 1.124

Required Readings:

  1. MacNeilage, P.F. The Origin of Speech.  (Available at the Co-op in the middle of September)
  2. A set of power point slide copies and a set of readings (Available at Jenn’s Copy; NW corner of 22nd and Guadalupe)

Schedule: Lectures & Readings

1. Background.

Aug 28, Sept 1. Language: What is it?

Sept 3, 8, 10. Evolution.  Weiner. Grant. Crick. Lewin Chs 4 & 7.

Sept 15, 17. Classicism versus Neodarwinism. MacNeilage: Causes of Form. MacNeilage: Notes on Objectivism.             MacNeilage: Chs 1. & 2.

2. Evolution of Language.

Sept 22, 24. Bickerton’s Scenario.  Calvin & Bickerton: Lingua ex Machina.  Chs 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11.

Sept 29. MacWhinney’s Scenario.  MacWhinney: The Gradual Emergence of Language.  Gopnik: Theory of Mind.              Rizzolatti et al., Mirrors in the Mind. (Some power points to come.)

Oct 1. Tomasello’s Scenario.  Tomasello: Origins of Human Communication, Ch. 7, From Ape Gestures to Human             Language. (Power points to come.)

3. Evolution of Speech: MacNeilage’s Scenario

Oct 6, 8, 13. What is Speech?  MacN: Ch 3.

 

Oct 15 MID TERM EXAM

 

Oct 20. How Speech got Started. MacN Ch 4.

Oct 22, 27. Acquisition and Evolution.  MacN: Chs 5 and 6.

Oct 29. First Words. MacN: Ch 7.

4. Brain and Speech/Language.

Nov 3, 5. The Brain. Gazzaniga, Ivry & Mangun pp. 44-68.

Nov 10, 12. Brain Evolution for the Frame/Content Mode   MacN: Chs 8 & 9.

Nov 17, 19. Evolution of Hemispheric Specializations including Speech.  MacN: Ch 10. MacNeilage, Rogers &             Vallortigara: Origins of the Left and Right Brain. (Some power points to come.)

Nov 24.  Broca’s Area and Language Embodiment. Wise: Evolution of Ventral Premotor Cortex and Primate Way             of Reaching. Willems and Hagoort: Neural Evidence for the Interplay Between Language, Gesture, and             Action: A Review. (Power points to come).

 

Nov 26. THANKSGIVING

 

5. Speech: Some Conclusions about Speech.

Dec . Ultimate Causes of Speech: Genes and Culture.  MacN: Ch 14. 

Dec 3 Conclusions  MacN. Ch 15.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content of Readings Packet.

Background

Introduction

MacNeilage, P.F. On the Causes of Form in Nature. 

MacNeilage, P.F. Notes on Objectivism, Formalism, Essentialism, Rationalism. 

Evolution

Weiner, J. The Handy-Dandy Evolution Prover. 

Grant, P.R. Natural Selection and Darwin’s Finches.

Crick, F. What Mad Pursuit: The Baffling Problem (excerpt). 

Lewin, R. Human Evolution, Ch 4 Primate Heritage.

Lewin, R. Human Evolution, Ch 7 Major steps in human evolution.  

Evolution of Language

Calvin, W.H. & Bickerton, D.  Lingua ex Machina (Excerpts).

MacWhinney, B.M. The Gradual Emergence of Language.

Gopnik, A. Theory of Mind.

Rizzolatti, G., Fogassi, L. & Galese, V. Mirrors of the Mind.

Tomasello: Origins of Human Communication, Ch. 7, From Ape Gestures to Human Language.

Brain and Speech

Gazzaniga, M., Ivry, I., & Mangun, G. Cognitive Neuroscience (Excerpt, pp. 44-68.)

MacNeilage, P.F., Rogers, L.J. & Vallortigara, G.  Origins of the Left and Right Brain.

Wise, S. Evolution of Ventral Premotor Cortex and Primate Way of Reaching.

Willems, R.M & Hagoort, P. Neural Evidence for the Interplay Between Language, Gesture, and Action: A Review.

 

 

 

 

PSY 301 • Introduction To Psychology

42980 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.124
show description

Basic problems and principles of human experience and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, or the equivalent in independent study.

PSY 337 • Psychology Of Language

43135 • Spring 2009
Meets MWF 200pm-300pm NOA 1.124
show description

Consideration of approaches to the study of language, its development in children, and its functioning; important research from psychology and linguistics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For psychology majors, upper-divison standing and Psychology 301 and 418 with a grade of at least C in each; for nonmajors, upper-division standing, Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C, and one of the following with a grade of at least C: Biology 318M, Civil Engineering 311S, Economics 329, Educational Psychoogy 371, Government 350K, Mathematics 316, Psychology 317, Sociology 317L, Social Work 318, Statistics 309.

Publications

MacNeilage, P.F., Rogers, L.J., & Vallortigara, G. Origins of the left and right brain. Scientific American, July 2009, 301, 60-67.

MacNeilage, P.F. The Origin of Speech. Oxford University Press, April 2008.

Davis, B.L., MacNeilage, P.F. & Matyear, C.  Acquisition of serial complexity in speech production:  A comparison of phonetic and phonological approaches to first word production. Phonetica, 2002, 59, 75-107.

MacNeilage, P.F. & Davis, B.L. Motor mechanisms in speech ontogeny: phylogenetic, neurobiological and linguistic implications.  Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 2001, 11, 696-700.

MacNeilage, P.F. & Davis, B.L. On the origin of internal structure of word forms. Science, 2000, 288, 527-531.

MacNeilage, P.F. Speech, motor control.  In G. Adelman and B. Smith (Eds) Encyclopedia of neuroscience, 2nd Edition. The Hague, Elsevier, l999, 409-412.

MacNeilage, P.F. The Frame/Content theory of evolution of speech production.  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, l998, 21, 499-546.

MacNeilage, P.F. Acquisition of speech.  In W.J. Hardcastle and J. Laver, (Eds) Handbook of Phonetic Sciences, Oxford, Blackwell, 1997.

MacNeilage, P.F. The "Postural Origins" theory of neurobiological asymmetries in primates. In N. Krasnegor, D. Rumbaugh, M. Studdert-Kennedy & B. Lindblom (Eds) Biobehavioral Foundations of Language Development, Hillsdale, N.J. Lawrence Erlbaum, 1990.

MacNeilage, P.F. Studdert-Kennedy, M.G. & Lindblom, B. Primate Handedness Reconsidered.  Behavioral and Brain Sciences, l987, 10, 247-303.

 

Books

The Origin of Speech

The Origin of Speech

 

Peter F. MacNeilage

The Origin of Speech
April 2008
Oxford University Press

 

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