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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Ronald J. Angel

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison

Professor
Ronald J. Angel

Contact

Biography

Ronald Angel's research interests encompass the areas of medical sociology, social welfare, poverty and minorities, demography and epidemiology, research methods and statistics.

Dr. Angel is Principal Investigator, along with co-Principal Investigators Linda Burton, Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Andrew Cherlin, Robert Moffitt, and William Julius Wilson, of "Welfare Reform and the Well-Being of Children: A Three City Study" funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

NIH Biosketch

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46145 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 900am-1000am CLA 0.118
show description

Course Description:

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

Course Requirements:

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in Burdine.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

Grading:

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.

 

SOC 358D • Health Policy & Health Systems

46290 • Fall 2014
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm BUR 224
show description

Cross listed with PBH 358D

Course Description: 

This is a new course that covers the essentials of health policy in the United States and compares the health care financing and delivery system in this country to those of other developed nations.  Students will learn the history of health-related legislation in the United States and investigate why this nation, unlike others, developed an employment-based health care financing system based on an insurance model rather than a publicly funded universal system.  Students will investigate the major political forces that have determined the structure of the health care system in the U.S. and examine issues related to differential access for minority Americans and those in marginal jobs that do not offer insurance coverage. 

Students will also become familiar with the legislative history of Medicaid and Medicare and the various changes that have been introduced to these programs since their introduction.  The course will examine mechanisms of reimbursement to doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers.  We will also examine the role of the pharmaceutical industry and investigate the control and regulations of drugs.  Students will learn about the structure and role of the National Institutes of Health and other major funders of medical research. 

Given the fact that the debate concerning the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) will be a central political issue for the next few years, students will learn about the history of health care reform over the twentieth century and debate various aspects of health care reform.  After taking this course the student will understand the various issues involved in the current health care debate and their implications for the future of American medicine and the health of the population.  In the future difficult debates concerning the rationing of care, end-of-life issues, and other difficult decisions will have to take place.  After taking the course the student will be equipped to engage in these debates.

The course will consist of two lectures per week and a discussion session in which students will form small groups and discuss the issues raised in lecture.

Prerequisites:   

Introduction to Public Health with a grade of at least B for public health majors; upper division standing for sociology majors.  The course is restricted to public health and sociology majors.

Required readings: 

T.R. Reid (2009).  The Healing of America:  A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care.  New York:  Penguin. 

Web-based readings will also be assigned.

Grading: 

The final course grade will be based on two hourly examinations and a short essay (approximately ten pages) on a topic of the student’s choice.  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  Attendance is mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.

SOC 396L • Ngo's In Developing World

46670 • Spring 2014
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 3.106
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Cross listed with LAS 381/PA 388/SW 3965K

Course Description: 

Today Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), many of which originated as organizations opposed to State excesses or failures, and many of which are faith-based, have assumed significant roles in providing social services to a wide range of people, as well as advocating for basic social and political rights.  Since the 1980s international competition, low economic growth rates, and elevated citizen expectations have placed serious strains on the State’s ability to provide retirement, health, educational, and other social services to populations, and especially to the poor and indigenous groups.  In this new and rapidly changing environment NGOs have become increasingly important organizations though which States sponsor basic social objectives.

In addition to the sectors in which they operate, NGOs vary tremendously in size, financing, administration, staffing, and more.  They range from informal small-scale local grassroots community initiatives to international and multi-lateral organizations with large budgets and professionalized staffs.  Many of the largest are quasi-governmental in the scale of their operations.  This course begins with a review of attempts to define and asses the boundaries of NGO activity and moves to an examination of the role of NGOs in providing social services.  We will examine the history of NGOs, their structure and financing, and the nature of the problems these organizational forms are best suited to address.  We will examine the consequences of professionalization on organizational structure, performance, and the evaluation of outcomes.  The course also examines the potential role of NGOs in fostering community participation in the solution of social problems and their role in the development of a sense of citizenship.  Although the focus of the course will be on Latin America course participants are free to examine the phenomenon in their own area of interest including the United States.

The course consists of readings with group discussion and presentations related to specific areas of NGO activity.  Weekly readings will be listed on Blackboard.  Each week a group of volunteers will serve as discussion leaders and will change the reading list as they deem appropriate.  The course grade will be based on a final paper of approximately 25 pages that deals with a topic of the student’s choice.  Attendance and participation are mandatory and will be taking into account in determining the final grade.  The three books that we will all read as a beginning to our discussions and that are available at the co-op include: 

Edwards, Michael, 2010, Civil Society, Second edition. Malden, MA:  Polity;

Bebbington, Anthony J, Samuel Hickey, Diana C. Mitlin.  2008.  Can NGOs Make a Difference?  The Challenge of Development alternatives.  London and New York:  Zed Books;

Keck, Margaret and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Activists Beyond Borders.  Ithaca, NY:  Cornell Univ. Press.

 

*  This course counts toward satisfaction of the requirements of the Portfolio Program in Nonprofit Studies at the RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.  More information on the portfolio program is available at ww.rgkcenter.org/portfolio.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46135 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 900am-1000am CLA 1.108
show description

Course Description:

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

Course Requirements:

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in Burdine.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

Grading:

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.

 

SOC 358D • Health Policy & Health Systems

46262 • Fall 2013
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm RLM 6.104
show description

Cross listed with PBH 358D

Course Description: 

This is a new course that covers the essentials of health policy in the United States and compares the health care financing and delivery system in this country to those of other developed nations.  Students will learn the history of health-related legislation in the United States and investigate why this nation, unlike others, developed an employment-based health care financing system based on an insurance model rather than a publicly funded universal system.  Students will investigate the major political forces that have determined the structure of the health care system in the U.S. and examine issues related to differential access for minority Americans and those in marginal jobs that do not offer insurance coverage. 

Students will also become familiar with the legislative history of Medicaid and Medicare and the various changes that have been introduced to these programs since their introduction.  The course will examine mechanisms of reimbursement to doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers.  We will also examine the role of the pharmaceutical industry and investigate the control and regulations of drugs.  Students will learn about the structure and role of the National Institutes of Health and other major funders of medical research. 

Given the fact that the debate concerning the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) will be a central political issue for the next few years, students will learn about the history of health care reform over the twentieth century and debate various aspects of health care reform.  After taking this course the student will understand the various issues involved in the current health care debate and their implications for the future of American medicine and the health of the population.  In the future difficult debates concerning the rationing of care, end-of-life issues, and other difficult decisions will have to take place.  After taking the course the student will be equipped to engage in these debates.

The course will consist of two lectures per week and a discussion session in which students will form small groups and discuss the issues raised in lecture.

Prerequisites:   

Introduction to Public Health with a grade of at least B for public health majors; upper division standing for sociology majors.  The course is restricted to public health and sociology majors.

Required readings: 

T.R. Reid (2009).  The Healing of America:  A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care.  New York:  Penguin. 

Web-based readings will also be assigned.

Grading: 

The final course grade will be based on two hourly examinations and a short essay (approximately ten pages) on a topic of the student’s choice.  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  Attendance is mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.

SOC 396L • Ngo's In Developing World

46005 • Spring 2013
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 0.108
(also listed as LAS 381 )
show description

Course Description: 

Today Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), many of which originated as organizations opposed to State excesses or failures, and many of which are faith-based, have assumed significant roles in providing social services to a wide range of people, as well as advocating for basic social and political rights.  Since the 1980s international competition, low economic growth rates, and elevated citizen expectations have placed serious strains on the State’s ability to provide retirement, health, educational, and other social services to populations, and especially to the poor and indigenous groups.  In this new and rapidly changing environment NGOs have become increasingly important organizations though which States sponsor basic social objectives.

In addition to the sectors in which they operate, NGOs vary tremendously in size, financing, administration, staffing, and more.  They range from informal small-scale local grassroots community initiatives to international and multi-lateral organizations with large budgets and professionalized staffs.  Many of the largest are quasi-governmental in the scale of their operations.  This course begins with a review of attempts to define and asses the boundaries of NGO activity and moves to an examination of the role of NGOs in providing social services.  We will examine the history of NGOs, their structure and financing, and the nature of the problems these organizational forms are best suited to address.  We will examine the consequences of professionalization on organizational structure, performance, and the evaluation of outcomes.  The course also examines the potential role of NGOs in fostering community participation in the solution of social problems and their role in the development of a sense of citizenship.  Although the focus of the course will be on Latin America course participants are free to examine the phenomenon in their own area of interest including the United States.

Texts

The course consists of readings with group discussion and presentations related to specific areas of NGO activity.  Weekly readings will be listed on Blackboard.  Each week a group of volunteers will serve as discussion leaders and will change the reading list as they deem appropriate. 

The three books that we will all read as a beginning to our discussions and that are available at the co-op include:  

Edwards, Michael, 2010, Civil Society, Second edition. Malden, MA:  Politity

Bebbington, Anthony J, Samuel Hickey, Diana C. Mitlin.  2008.  Can NGOs Make a Difference?  The Challenge of Development alternatives.  London and New York:  Zed Books

Keck, Margaret and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Activists Beyond Borders.  Ithaca, NY:  Cornell Univ. Press.

Grading and Requirements

The course grade will be based on a final paper of approximately 25 pages that deals with a topic of the student’s choice.  Attendance and participation are mandatory and will be taking into account in determining the final grade.  

 *  This course counts toward satisfaction of the requirements of the Portfolio Program in Nonprofit Studies at the RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service at the LBJ School of Public Affairs.  More information on the portfolio program is available at ww.rgkcenter.org/portfolio.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45501-45504 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1200pm-100pm BUR 130
show description

Course Description:

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

Texts:

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in Burdine.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

Grading and Requirement: 

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  This is a required course and a C or higher is required for it to count toward the Sociology major.  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.

SOC 358D • Health Policy & Health Systems

45645 • Fall 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 136
show description

Cross listed with PBH 358D

Course Description: 

This is a new course that covers the essentials of health policy in the United States and compares the health care financing and delivery system in this country to those of other developed nations.  Students will learn the history of health-related legislation in the United States and investigate why this nation, unlike others, developed an employment-based health care financing system based on an insurance model rather than a publicly funded universal system.  Students will investigate the major political forces that have determined the structure of the health care system in the U.S. and examine issues related to differential access for minority Americans and those in marginal jobs that do not offer insurance coverage. 

Students will also become familiar with the legislative history of Medicaid and Medicare and the various changes that have been introduced to these programs since their introduction.  The course will examine mechanisms of reimbursement to doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers.  We will also examine the role of the pharmaceutical industry and investigate the control and regulations of drugs.  Students will learn about the structure and role of the National Institutes of Health and other major funders of medical research. 

Given the fact that the debate concerning the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) will be a central political issue for the next few years, students will learn about the history of health care reform over the twentieth century and debate various aspects of health care reform.  After taking this course the student will understand the various issues involved in the current health care debate and their implications for the future of American medicine and the health of the population.  In the future difficult debates concerning the rationing of care, end-of-life issues, and other difficult decisions will have to take place.  After taking the course the student will be equipped to engage in these debates.

The course will consist of two lectures per week and a discussion session in which students will form small groups and discuss the issues raised in lecture.

Prerequisites:   

Introduction to Public Health with a grade of at least B for public health majors; upper division standing for sociology majors.  The course is restricted to public health and sociology majors.

Required readings: 

T.R. Reid (2009).  The Healing of America:  A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care.  New York:  Penguin. 

Web-based readings will also be assigned.

Grading: 

The final course grade will be based on two hourly examinations and a short essay (approximately ten pages) on a topic of the student’s choice.  To determine the final grade these weighted scores will be summed and the weighted total curved so that approximately 15% of the class receives an A, 15% A-, 15% B+, 15% B, 30% C, etc.  Attendance is mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  Three unexcused absences will result in an automatic full letter grade drop in the final grade.  More than six unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45480 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 900am-1000am BUR 220
show description

Description:

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

 The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

Texts:

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in Burdine.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

Grading:

Three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade)

Graded lab work (10% of the final grade)

Two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade). 

Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.

SOC 358D • Health Policy & Health Systems

45460 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 136
show description

 Prerequisites:   

Introduction to Public Health with a grade of at least B for public health majors; upper division standing for sociology majors.  The course is restricted to public health and sociology majors.

Description:

This is a new course that covers the essentials of health policy in the United States and compares the health care financing and delivery system in this country to those of other developed nations.  Students will learn the history of health-related legislation in the United States and investigate why this nation, unlike others, developed an employment-based health care financing system based on an insurance model rather than a publicly funded universal system.  Students will investigate the major political forces that have determined the structure of the health care system in the U.S. and examine issues related to differential access for minority Americans and those in marginal jobs that do not offer insurance coverage. 

Students will also become familiar with the legislative history of Medicaid and Medicare and the various changes that have been introduced to these programs since their introduction.  The course will examine mechanisms of reimbursement to doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers.  We will also examine the role of the pharmaceutical industry and investigate the control and regulations of drugs.  Students will learn about the structure and role of the National Institutes of Health and other major funders of medical research. 

Given the fact that the debate concerning the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) will be a central political issue for the next few years, students will learn about the history of health care reform over the twentieth century and debate various aspects of health care reform.  After taking this course the student will understand the various issues involved in the current health care debate and their implications for the future of American medicine and the health of the population.  In the future difficult debates concerning the rationing of care, end-of-life issues, and other difficult decisions will have to take place.  After taking the course the student will be equipped to engage in these debates.

The course will consist of two lectures per week and a discussion session in which students will form small groups and discuss the issues raised in lecture.

 Required readings: 

Lawrence R. Jacobs and Theda Skocpol (2010).  Health Care Reform and American Politics:  What Everyone Needs to Know.  New York:  Oxford University Press; and

T.R. Reid (2009).  The Healing of America:  A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care.  New York:  Penguin.  Web-based readings will also be assigned.

Grading: 

The final course grade will be based on two hourly examinations and a short essay (approximately ten pages) on a topic of the student’s choice.  Attendance is mandatory.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46050-46055 • Spring 2011
Meets MW 900am-1000am BUR 220
show description

Spring, 2011, Sociology 317M (46050 and 46055):  Introduction to Social Research

Class MW:  9:00am – 10:00am, Burdine 220; Lab (46050)  F: 9:00am – 11:00am, Burdine 124; (46055) W:  1pm – 3pm, Burdine 124

 

Instructor:            Professor Ronald Angel                         E-mail:  rangel@Austin.utexas.edu                       

Office:                        460 Burdine                                                Office phone:  232-6315                       

Office Hours:            Wed., 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. or by appt.           

 

Course Description:

 

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

 

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

 

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

 

Course Requirements:

 

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in Burdine.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

 

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

45465-45467 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 900am-1000am BUR 134
show description

Prerequisite:

SOC 317L

 

Description:

Course Description:

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.
 
Course Requirements:

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in Burdine.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.


 

SOC 396L • Nongov Orgs In Devel Worlds

45795 • Fall 2010
Meets W 1200pm-300pm BUR 214
(also listed as LAS 381 )
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Meets with LAS 381/SW 395K/PA 388K

 

Course Description:

In recent decades Non-Governmental and Non-Profit organizations (NGOs or NPOs) have proliferated in all nations of the world.  This new organizational form reflects local and international initiatives related to human rights, the environment, sustainable development, health, education and much more.  Several attempts have been made to categorize and understand the function of these new and varied organizational forms that exist in the contested and ill-defined economic, political, and social area that lies between the Market and the State and that is often referred to as Civil Society.

Since the 1980s international competition, low economic growth rates, and elevated citizen expectations have placed serious strains on the State’s ability to provide retirement, health, educational, and other social services to populations, and especially to the poor and indigenous groups.  At the same time migration, growing female labor force participation, and changing family forms have reduced the local community’s ability to cope with the needs of its members.  In this new and rapidly changing environment NGOs have become increasingly important organizations though which States sponsor basic social objectives.

The course consists of readings with group discussion and presentations related to specific areas of NGO activity.  The readings will be listed on Blackboard.  Given the typically large size of the class we will break up into groups, each of which will assume responsibility for leading the discussion related to a specific topic.  The group will begin with the recommended readings and drop and add readings as they decide.  The course grade will be based on a final paper of approximately 25 pages that deals with a topic of the student’s choice.  Required and recommended readings are listed on blackboard and the list is a still a work in progress.  Individual participants will read literature relevant to their own research topic.  The three books that we will all read as a beginning to our discussions and that should be available at the co-op include:

Bebbington, Anthony J, Samuel Hickey, Diana C. Miltin.  2008.  Can NGOs Make a Difference?  The Challenge of Development alternatives.  London and New York:  Zed Books.

Keck, Margaret and Kathryn Sikkink. 1998. Activists Beyond Borders.  Ithaca, NY:  Cornell Univ. Press.

Mendelson, Sarah and John Glenn (eds). 2002.  The Power and Limits of NGOs. New York, NY:  Columbia University Press.


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46455 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 1100-1200 BUR 134
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Course Description:

 

In this course we will investigate the methods used in social scientific research.  We will examine such issues as how one establishes causality and just what “proof” consists of in social scientific inquiry.  We will investigate the nature of data and examine the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data.  We will also deal with issues related to ethics and the uses to which social scientific research can legitimately be put.

 

The final project consists of a research proposal for a theoretical project on a topic you will choose in consultation with the Professor or the Teaching Assistant.  In it you will outline all relevant aspects of the project, including sampling and questionnaire construction, but you will not actually carry out the research itself.  In preparation for the final research proposal two preliminary papers are required.  In these you will (1) define the research question and (2) outline the research methods to be used to address it.   The course includes a lab in which material presented in class will be elaborated and in which computer applications will be discussed.  All course materials will be available on Blackboard.  Assignments, schedule changes, and announcements related to the course will appear on Blackboard and students are responsible for keeping informed.

 

The course includes three Internet assignments that involve answering a particular question using information you locate online.  These assignments will be related to the development of the final research proposal.

 

Course Requirements:

 

In the course we will do a good bit of data analysis with an eye toward understanding what numbers and graphs can tell us and what they cannot.  The required text is Earl Babbie, The Practice of Social Research, tenth edition or later, Thompson publishers.  Other readings are provided in the Readings file on Blackboard and will be assigned in class.  We will use the computer lab in Burdine.  All of the software and manuals are available on line.  The Teaching Assistant is available to provide whatever help you need.

 

The final grade will be based on three equally weighted hourly exams (together 40% of the final grade), graded lab work (10% of the final grade) and two graded writing assignments, the first of which is a draft of the problem statement of the final research proposal (15% and 35% of the final grade).  Attendance at class and lab are mandatory and will be factored into the final grade.  All assignments must be turned in on the date they are due.  Late work will be accepted only with prior approval.  The lab sessions will be critical in developing the proposal.

 

Note:  Students with disabilities may request appropriate academic accommodations from the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement, Services for Students with Disabilities, 471-6259.

 

Weekly topics and readings:

 

August 27, September 3:  Introduction:  The nature of scientific inquiry.

                                               

Babbie, Chapters 1, 17

 

September 8:  Introduction (Continued):  The connection between Theory and Practice; Social Statistics.

 

Babbie, Chapters 2, 16

 

September 15:  Conceptualization, Operationalization, and Measurement.

 

Babbie, Chapter 5; Begin Writing Assignment 1:  Framing a researchable question and reviewing previous research.  Choose a question to address in the research proposal.

 

September 22:  Research Design

 

Babbie, Chapter 4; Internet Assignment 1 (Due Thursday, September 24).

 

September 29:  Quantitative Measurement; The ethics of Social Research.

 

Babbie, Chapters 3, 6

 

October 6:  Survey Research—what sorts of questions are appropriate for this methodology? 

 

Babbie, Chapter 9

 

(First Hourly Examination, Thursday, October 8)

 

October 13:  Sampling; Finding or Developing a Sampling Frame:  Developing your survey design.  Internet Assignment 2 (Due Thursday, October 15):  Developing a questionnaire.

 

Babbie, Chapter 7

 

 

October 20:   More on Survey Research and Sampling; Intense attention to the specifics of your research proposal.

 

(First Writing Assignment due on Thursday, October 22)

 

October 27:  Experiments.

 

Babbie, Chapter 8

 

November 3:  The Elaboration Model.  Begin work on the final research proposal.  Internet Assignment 3(Due Thursday, November 5).

 

Babbie, Chapter 15.  Readings to be assigned.

 

November 10:  Quantitative Data Analysis.

 

Babbie, Chapter 14.  Readings to be assigned.

 

(Second Hourly Examination, Thursday, November 12)

 

November 17:  Continuation of Quantitative Data Analysis:  Framing your question statistically; what numbers can and cannot tell you and the logic of multivariate analysis.

 

November 24:  Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis.

 

Babbie, Chapters 10, 13

 

December 1:  Multiple Methods:  Triangulation—using multiple methodologies to address a specific research question.

 

Babbie, Chapters 11, 12 Sample Variability; Chapter 7

 

(Third Hourly Examination, Thursday December 3)

 

(Final Research proposal due Monday, December 14)

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