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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

John S. Butler

Ph. D. 1974, Organizational Science, Statistics and Methods, Northwestern University

Professor
John S. Butler

Contact

SOC 321K • Entrepreneurship & Innovation

46385 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GSB 5.142A
show description

COURSE PURPOSE: KNOWLEDGE AND KNOW-HOW

Entrepreneurship and innovation are the principal source of jobs and wealth in market economies. This

course is concern with entrepreneurship, with a special emphasis on technology transfer and wealth

creation. Technology transfer is the process of taking innovations out of laboratories and finding

commercial applications for those technologies. Although we will look at all kinds of entrepreneurship,

the focus of the group project is on technology transfer and new venture development. The course is also

concern with explaining “how” entrepreneurship takes place as well as “why” it takes place. The “how”

of new venture development is related to the entrepreneurial process (innovation, technology transfer

assessment, business plans, fund raising, launching of the enterprise, and the harvest or selling of the

enterprise)? Research in this area is rich, comes out of the discipline of Management and, tends to

 concentrate on case studies and best practices. The “why” of entrepreneurship is concerned with why

people and groups of people engage in the entrepreneurial process? Research in the area is found in the

disciplines of History, Sociology, Psychology and Economics, and is less concerned with case studies but

instead concentrates on statistical analysis of measured variables of individuals and groups of individuals.

The course brings together both the Business side of entrepreneurship research and the Liberal Arts side

of new venture development. The course thus concentrates on the entrepreneurial process as well as the

history (elements from the ancient world) and theoretical aspects of new venture developments. Reading

range from the development of high tech firms (remember that high tech is everything from the discovery

of fire, automobiles and airplanes) to how immigrants and Americans develop and create wealth. The

course also utilizes “live” case studies; these are individuals who have created wealth and will share their

knowledge with the class. The overall aim of the course is to create within you the idea that someone has

to concentrate on wealth creation and job creation within the context of market economies. You will be

guided with a tool that is called “Quicklook,” which is designed to analyze a new technologies market

potential. You will have an opportunity to create your “BIG IDEA” with your classmates as team

members. The final project are for the teams to present their “BIG IDEA” to the class.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

All reading listed below are required. The course encourages a lot of discussions, questions, and

opinions. I expect everyone to be in class for every class period.

Books:

1. Richard C. Dorf and Thomas H. Byers, Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

2. Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur, Business Model Generation

3. Gary Hoover, The Art of Enterprise and can be downloaded for $10 from the link below

http://www.scribd.com/doc/25085990/The-Art-of-Enterprise-by-Gary-Hoover-January-2010

 

Readings: (All posted on Blackboard)

1. Drucker, “Modern Prophets: Schumpeter or Keynes”

2. William D. Bygrave, “The Entrepreneurial Process”

3. John Sibley Butler, “The Science of Entrepreneurship”

4. Raymond W. Smilor, David Gibson and George Kozmetsky “Creating the Technopolis:

High-Technology Development in Austin, Texas”

5. David V. Gibson and Pedro Conceição, “Incubating and Networking Technology

Commercialization Centers among Emerging, Developing, and Mature Technopolis”

6. Judith K. Larsen and Everett M. Rogers, “Silicon Valley: The Rise and Falling Off of

Entrepreneurial Fever”

7. Quicklook Tool for Technology Transfer and Example of Quicklook

8. Anna Lee Saxenian and Jumbi Edulbehram, “Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley”

9. John Sibley Butler and George Kozmetsky, “Immigrant and Minority Entrepreneurship,

Introduction” to Margaret Levenstein, “African-American Entrepreneurship: View from the

1910 Census”

10. “American Made: The Impact of Immigrant Entrepreneurs on U.S. Competitiveness”,

Sections I, II, III

Quicklook “Cases”: (All posted on Blackboard)

1. Part Washing Device

2. Rural Banking

3. Leon3

Possible Guest Speakers (To Be Announced)

Alan Blake, CEO, Glofish (www.glofish.com)

Robert Dwain, Founder of Austin Computers

Gary Hoover, Founder of Hoovers and Book Stop (http://hooversworld.com)

COURSE EVALUATION:

The final grade for the course will be based on the following criteria:

(1) Two essay examinations (80% of grade); the dates are February 16th and April 5th.

(2) A final group project that is based on an innovative idea, or what I call the Big Idea. We will divide

the class into innovative teams that will develop an idea for an “elevator speech” (15 minutes) at the

end of class (20% of final grade). This idea will be taken from laboratories that are presented in class.

I will assign individuals to teams based on the alphabetical roster. Teams are required to present

a (PowerPoint) presentation to the class. All presentations should be emailed to me

(john.butler@mccombs.utexas.edu) at the end of the week prior to the start of class presentations. I

will put them all on my computer (to save set-up time) so that we can quickly move through the

presentations. In addition, the team will upload a completed Quicklook technology tool and the

PowerPoint presentation on Blackboard under the Assignment tab. Actual date to be determined

when the official final exam schedule is released, about a month before the semester ends.

 

SOC 321K • Entrepreneurship & Innovation

45730 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GSB 5.142A
show description

 

COURSE PURPOSE: KNOWLEDGE AND KNOW-HOW

 

Entrepreneurship and innovation are the principal source of jobs and wealth in market economies. This

 

course is concern with entrepreneurship, with a special emphasis on technology transfer and wealth

 

creation. Technology transfer is the process of taking innovations out of laboratories and finding

 

commercial applications for those technologies. Although we will look at all kinds of entrepreneurship,

 

the focus of the group project is on technology transfer and new venture development. The course is also

 

concern with explaining “how” entrepreneurship takes place as well as “why” it takes place. The “how”

 

of new venture development is related to the entrepreneurial process (innovation, technology transfer

 

assessment, business plans, fund raising, launching of the enterprise, and the harvest or selling of the

 

enterprise)? Research in this area is rich, comes out of the discipline of Management and, tends to

 

concentrate on case studies and best practices. The “why” of entrepreneurship is concerned with why

 

people and groups of people engage in the entrepreneurial process? Research in the area is found in the

 

disciplines of History, Sociology, Psychology and Economics, and is less concerned with case studies but

 

instead concentrates on statistical analysis of measured variables of individuals and groups of individuals.

 

The course brings together both the Business side of entrepreneurship research and the Liberal Arts side

 

of new venture development. The course thus concentrates on the entrepreneurial process as well as the

 

history (elements from the ancient world) and theoretical aspects of new venture developments. Reading

 

range from the development of high tech firms (remember that high tech is everything from the discovery

 

of fire, automobiles and airplanes) to how immigrants and Americans develop and create wealth. The

 

course also utilizes “live” case studies; these are individuals who have created wealth and will share their

 

knowledge with the class. The overall aim of the course is to create within you the idea that someone has

 

to concentrate on wealth creation and job creation within the context of market economies. You will be

 

guided with a tool that is called “Quicklook,” which is designed to analyze a new technologies market

 

potential. You will have an opportunity to create your “BIG IDEA” with your classmates as team

 

members. The final project are for the teams to present their “BIG IDEA” to the class.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

All reading listed below are required. The course encourages a lot of discussions, questions, and

opinions. I expect everyone to be in class for every class period.

Books:

1. Richard C. Dorf and Thomas H. Byers, Technology Ventures: From Idea to Enterprise

2. Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur, Business Model Generation

3. Gary Hoover, The Art of Enterprise and can be downloaded for $10 from the link below

http://www.scribd.com/doc/25085990/The-Art-of-Enterprise-by-Gary-Hoover-January-2010

 

Readings: (All posted on Blackboard)

1. Drucker, “Modern Prophets: Schumpeter or Keynes”

2. William D. Bygrave, “The Entrepreneurial Process”

3. John Sibley Butler, “The Science of Entrepreneurship”

4. Raymond W. Smilor, David Gibson and George Kozmetsky “Creating the Technopolis:

High-Technology Development in Austin, Texas”

5. David V. Gibson and Pedro Conceição, “Incubating and Networking Technology

Commercialization Centers among Emerging, Developing, and Mature Technopolis”

6. Judith K. Larsen and Everett M. Rogers, “Silicon Valley: The Rise and Falling Off of

Entrepreneurial Fever”

7. Quicklook Tool for Technology Transfer and Example of Quicklook

8. Anna Lee Saxenian and Jumbi Edulbehram, “Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley”

9. John Sibley Butler and George Kozmetsky, “Immigrant and Minority Entrepreneurship,

Introduction” to Margaret Levenstein, “African-American Entrepreneurship: View from the

1910 Census”

10. “American Made: The Impact of Immigrant Entrepreneurs on U.S. Competitiveness”,

Sections I, II, III

Quicklook “Cases”: (All posted on Blackboard)

1. Part Washing Device

2. Rural Banking

3. Leon3

Possible Guest Speakers (To Be Announced)

Alan Blake, CEO, Glofish (www.glofish.com)

Robert Dwain, Founder of Austin Computers

Gary Hoover, Founder of Hoovers and Book Stop (http://hooversworld.com)

COURSE EVALUATION:

The final grade for the course will be based on the following criteria:

(1) Two essay examinations (80% of grade); the dates are February 16th and April 5th.

(2) A final group project that is based on an innovative idea, or what I call the Big Idea. We will divide

the class into innovative teams that will develop an idea for an “elevator speech” (15 minutes) at the

end of class (20% of final grade). This idea will be taken from laboratories that are presented in class.

I will assign individuals to teams based on the alphabetical roster. Teams are required to present

a (PowerPoint) presentation to the class. All presentations should be emailed to me

(john.butler@mccombs.utexas.edu) at the end of the week prior to the start of class presentations. I

will put them all on my computer (to save set-up time) so that we can quickly move through the

presentations. In addition, the team will upload a completed Quicklook technology tool and the

PowerPoint presentation on Blackboard under the Assignment tab. Actual date to be determined

when the official final exam schedule is released, about a month before the semester ends.

 

SOC 321K • Entrepreneurship & Innovation

45510 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am GSB 5.142A
show description

Course Description:

Entrepreneurship and innovation are the principal source of jobs and wealth in market economies. This

course is concern with entrepreneurship, with a special emphasis on technology transfer and wealth

creation. Technology transfer is the process of taking innovations out of laboratories and finding

commercial applications for those technologies. Although we will look at all kinds of entrepreneurship,

the focus of the group project is on technology transfer and new venture development. The course is also

concern with explaining “how” entrepreneurship takes place as well as “why” it takes place. The “how”

of new venture development is related to the entrepreneurial process (innovation, technology transfer

assessment, business plans, fund raising, launching of the enterprise, and the harvest or selling of the

enterprise)? Research in this area is rich, comes out of the discipline of Management and, tends to

concentrate on case studies and best practices. The “why” of entrepreneurship is concerned with why

people and groups of people engage in the entrepreneurial process? Research in the area is found in the

disciplines of History, Sociology, Psychology and Economics, and is less concerned with case studies but

instead concentrates on statistical analysis of measured variables of individuals and groups of individuals.

The course brings together both the Business side of entrepreneurship research and the Liberal Arts side

of new venture development. The course thus concentrates on the entrepreneurial process as well as the

history (elements from the ancient world) and theoretical aspects of new venture developments. Reading

range from the development of high tech firms (remember that high tech is everything from the discovery

of fire, automobiles and airplanes) to how immigrants and Americans develop and create wealth. The

course also utilizes “live” case studies; these are individuals who have created wealth and will share their

knowledge with the class. The overall aim of the course is to create within you the idea that someone has

to concentrate on wealth creation and job creation within the context of market economies. You will be

guided with a tool that is called “Quicklook,” which is designed to analyze a new technologies market

potential. You will have an opportunity to create your “BIG IDEA” with your classmates as team

members. The final project for the teams are to present their “BIG IDEA” to the class.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

All reading listed below are required. The course encourages a lot of discussions, questions, and

opinions. I expect everyone to be in class for every class period.

Books:

1. Richard C. Dorf and Thomas H. Byers, Technology Ventures: From Idea to Product

2. Gary Hoover, The Art of Enterprise and can be downloaded for $10 from the link below

http://www.scribd.com/doc/25085990/The-Art-of-Enterprise-by-Gary-Hoover-January-2010

Readings: (All posted on Blackboard)

1. Drucker, “Modern Prophets: Schumpeter or Keynes”

2. William D. Bygrave, “The Entrepreneurial Process”

3. John Sibley Butler, “The Science of Entrepreneurship”

4. Raymond W. Smilor, David Gibson and George Kozmetsky “Creating the Technopolis:

High-Technology Development in Austin, Texas”

5. David V. Gibson and Pedro Conceição, “Incubating and Networking Technology

Commercialization Centers among Emerging, Developing, and Mature Technopolis”

6. Judith K. Larsen and Everett M. Rogers, “Silicon Valley: The Rise and Falling Off of

Entrepreneurial Fever”

7. Quicklook Tool for Technology Transfer and Example of Quicklook

8. Anna Lee Saxenian and Jumbi Edulbehram, “Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley”

9. John Sibley Butler and George Kozmetsky, “Immigrant and Minority Entrepreneurship,

Introduction” to Margaret Levenstein, “African-American Entrepreneurship: View from the

1910 Census”

10. “American Made: The Impact of Immigrant Entrepreneurs on U.S. Competitiveness”,

Sections I, II, III

COURSE EVALUATION:

The final grade for the course will be based on the following criteria:

(1) Two essay examinations (70% of grade); 

(2) A final group project that is based on an innovative idea, or what I call the Big Idea. We will divide

the class into innovative teams that will develop an idea for an “elevator speech” (15 minutes) at the

end of class (30% of final grade). This idea will be taken from laboratories that are presented in class.

I will assign individuals to teams based on the alphabetical roster. Teams are required to present

a presentation (PowerPoint) to the class. In addition, the team will turn in a completed Quicklook

technology tool. All presentations should be emailed to me (john.butler@mccombs.utexas.edu) at the

end of the week prior to the start of class presentations. I will put them all in my computer (to save

set-up time) so that we can quickly move through the presentations.

SOC 396L • Entrepreneurship & Incubation

45790 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 930am-1100am GSB 3.138
show description

Meets with MAN 385 MW 9:30-11:00

SOC 321K • Entrepreneurship & Innovation

46350 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 UTC 1.144
(also listed as MAN 337 )
show description

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Management 337 (Unique Number 04270)

Sociology 321K (Unique Number 46350)

SPRING 2010

  T&TH 9:30-11

UTC 1.144

 

Professor:  John Sibley Butler, Professor of Management and Sociology

Director IC2 and Herb Kelleher Center for Entrepreneurship

Office:  CBA 6.424   471-4788

E-Mail: John.Butler@mccombs.utexas.edu

Office Hours (CBA 6.424) Tuesday/Thursday, 11-12am and by Appointment

 

Course Purpose:  KNOWLEDGE AND KNOW-HOW

 Entrepreneurship and innovation are the principal source of jobs and wealth in market economies.   This course is concern with entrepreneurship, with a special emphasis on technology transfer and wealth creation.   Technology transfer is the process of taking innovations out of laboratories and finding commercial applications for those technologies.  Although we will look at all kinds of entrepreneurship, the focus of the group project is on technology transfer and new venture development.  The course is also concern with explaining “how” entrepreneurship takes place as well as “why” it takes place.  The “how” of new venture development is related to the entrepreneurial process (innovation, technology transfer assessment, business plans, fund raising, launching of the enterprise, and the harvest or selling of the enterprise)?  Research in this area is rich, comes out of the discipline of Management and, tends to concentrate on case studies and best practices.  The “why” of entrepreneurship is concerned with why people and groups of people engage in the entrepreneurial process?  Research in the area is found in the disciplines of History, Sociology, Psychology and Economics, and is less concerned with case studies but instead concentrates on statistical analysis of measured variables of individuals and groups of individuals.  The course brings together both the Business side of entrepreneurship research and the Liberal Arts side of new venture development.  The course thus concentrates on the entrepreneurial process as well as the history (elements from the ancient world) and theoretical aspects of new venture developments.  Reading range from the development of high tech firms (remember that high tech is everything from the discovery of fire, automobiles and airplanes) to how immigrants and Americans develop and create wealth.   The course also utilizes “live” case studies; these are individuals who have created wealth and will share their knowledge with the class.  The overall aim of the course is to create within you the idea that someone has to concentrate on wealth creation and job creation within the context of market economies.  You will be guided with a tool that is called “Quicklook,” which is designed to analyze a new technologies market potential.  You will have an opportunity to create your “BIG IDEA” with your classmates as team members.  The final project for the teams are to present their “BIG IDEA” to the class.

Course Requirements:

All reading listed below are required.  The course encourages a lot of discussions, questions, and opinions.  I expect everyone to be in class for every class period. 

Books:

1.  Richard C. Dorf and Thomas H. Byers, Technology Ventures:  From Idea to Product

      2.  Gary Hoover, The Art of Enterprise and can be downloaded for $10 from the link below 

http://www.scribd.com/doc/25085990/The-Art-of-Enterprise-by-Gary-Hoover-January-2010

Readings:  (All posted on Blackboard) 

            1.  Drucker, “Modern Prophets: Schumpeter or Keynes”

2.  William D. Bygrave, “The Entrepreneurial Process”

3.  John Sibley Butler, “The Science of Entrepreneurship”

4.  Raymond W. Smilor, David Gibson and George Kozmetsky “Creating the Technopolis:  High-Technology Development in Austin, Texas”

5.  David V. Gibson and Pedro Conceição, “Incubating and Networking Technology Commercialization Centers among Emerging, Developing, and Mature Technopolis”

6.  Judith K. Larsen and Everett M. Rogers, “Silicon Valley:  The Rise and Falling Off of Entrepreneurial Fever”

7.  Quicklook Tool for Technology Transfer and Example of Quicklook

8.  Anna Lee Saxenian and Jumbi Edulbehram, “Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley”

9.  John Sibley Butler and George Kozmetsky, “Immigrant and Minority Entrepreneurship, Introduction” to Margaret Levenstein, “African-American Entrepreneurship:  View from the 1910 Census”

10.  “American Made:  The Impact of Immigrant Entrepreneurs on U.S. Competitiveness”, Sections I, II, III

Possible Guest Speakers (To Be Announced)

 Alan Blake, CEO, Glofish (www.glofish.com)

Carl Paul, Founder and past CEO of Golfsmith, In. (www.golfsmith.com)

Robert Dwain, Founder of Austin Computers

Gary Hoover, Founder of Hoovers and Book Stop (http://hooversworld.com)

COURSE Evaluation: 

The final grade for the course will be based on the following criteria:

(1)  Two essay examinations (70% of grade); the dates are February 18th and April 8th.

(2)  A final group project that is based on an innovative idea, or what I call the Big Idea. We will divide the class into innovative teams that will develop an idea for an “elevator speech” (15 minutes) at the end of class (30% of final grade).  This idea will be taken from laboratories that are presented in class.  I will assign individuals to teams based on the alphabetical roster.    Teams are required to present a presentation (PowerPoint) to the class.  In addition, the team will turn in a completed Quicklook technology tool.  All presentations should be emailed to me (john.butler@mccombs.utexas.edu) at the end of the week prior to the start of class presentations.  I will put them all in my computer (to save set-up time) so that we can quickly move through the presentations. 

ESTIMATED COURSE OUTLINE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS

Part I:  Introduction to the Entrepreneurial Process and the Science of Entrepreneurship:  How Wealth is created and the historical context of Wealth Creation

This section provides an overview of the entrepreneurial process and the “Science of Entrepreneurship.”  It is a preview of the things that we will study and the things that we will do in the course.  The entrepreneurial process starts with opportunity identification and ends with creating and launching a company.   Innovation is a key component of the course.   Our analysis will reveal that innovation and new venture development did not start in the 1980s with the computer revolution, or with the inventions of the late 1800s.  Instead, the origins of innovation and entrepreneurship can be traced to the ancient world.  Lectures and reading will bring the ancient world to life and reveal lessons for the study and practice of entrepreneurship.  As we engage in studies of the ancient world, we will at also bring into the analysis the study and practice of “modern” entrepreneurship.  We will wrap the analysis with the ideas of major economist and sociologist who have tried to predict when and how entrepreneurship takes place.

Week of:

January 18th     Drucker, “Modern Prophets: Schumpeter Keynes” (Blackboard)

                        Bygrave, “The Entrepreneurial Process” (Blackboard)

                        Hoover Chapters. 1,2,3,4

January 25th     Butler, “The Science of Entrepreneurship” (“Blackboard)

                        Hoover, Chapter 9

                        Dorf and Byers, Chapter 1

                          Learning Objectives:  To present a general understanding of how entrepreneurship and innovation fits into the economy; to understand the importance of entrepreneurship to market economies and to understand how the field of Economics tries to make sense out of the economy.  To get a complete overview of the entrepreneurial process so that we can introduce elements of that process as the class progresses.  Also to understand that there is a “science” of entrepreneurship that can be traced from 2000 BC to the present, with patterns that reflect the relationship between new ideas, technology, and wealth creation.  Thus, entrepreneurship has been the primary source of wealth creation and job creation for generations.  This science has lessons for the modern study and practice of entrepreneurship.  Also, to began to try and understand how to “think” like a person who is interested in changing the world, destroying old business models, and creating new innovative ways of doing business.

Part II:  Innovation Wealth Creation and the Science City:  The Context of Successful New Venture Development and Technology Commercialization

The Science City is a concept utilized by the Ancient Greeks; it is based on the idea of a partnership between universities, business communities, and government.  These units come together to create the structures that produce entrepreneurial success.    This section takes a look at research on the science city from the ancient world to the present, with an emphasis on new science cities such as Austin, Texas and Silicon Valley.  Tools of technology transfer will also be presented (Quicklook and the sources of innovation).

Week of:

February 1st     Dorf and Byers, Chapter 2; Hoover, Chapters 14, 15

                        Introduction to Quicklook (Technology Transfer Tool) (Blackboard)

                        Raymond W. Smilor, David Gibson and George Kozmetsky, “Creating the Technopolis:  High-Technology Development in Austin, Texas” (Blackboard)

                        Judith Larsen and Everett Rogers, “Silicon Valley” (Blackboard)

February 8th     David V. Gibson and Pedro Conceição, “Incubating and Networking Technology Commercialization Centers among Emerging, Developing, and Mature Technopolis” (Blackboard)

February 15th   Hoover, Chapters 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 

Learning Objectives:  To understand how why some regions are very entrepreneurial and others are not.  To understand technology transfer, or the movement of innovation from laboratories to the business world; to introduce the idea that technologies or patents are sitting in pubic laboratories and can be transferred to the business world.  To introduce the issues of globalization and entrepreneurship and major entrepreneurial trends for the 21st Century; to understand why the choice of location is important for the entrepreneur.

Part III:  The Entrepreneurial Process:  Ideas and Wealth Creation

The purpose of this section is to understand the relationship between new ideas and the development of wealth.  We are interested in process, and how ideas inform process.  We are interested in how one creates an organization that will allow a product or service to go to the market.  Both the sociological (Hoover’s work) and the business best practices (Dorf and Byers) come together to create the entrepreneurial experience.

Week of

February 22nd   Dorf and Byers, Chapters 2, 3, 4, 5, 18, 19

Hoover, Chapters 5, 6

March 1st         Dorf and Byers, Chapters 6, 7, 8, 9

Hoover, Chapters 7, 8

March 8th         Dorf and Byers, Chapter 10

Learning Objectives:  To began to put ideas to the market with a concentration on process.

March 15th – 18th         SPRING BREAK

 

Part IV:  Immigrant American Entrepreneurship and Innovation:  The Source of Entrepreneurs and Continuous Tradition of Wealth Creation Among New Comers

 

One of the most systematic findings of the research literature over the last one hundred years is that the foreign born are twice as likely as the native born to be self-employed.  This has been true since economies became market based.  Early scholars, such as Georg Simmel, called entrepreneurs “strangers” because they were less likely to be from the host society.   Entrepreneurship, in this tradition, is seen as a mode of adaptation to market economies.  This section looks at the impact of minority and immigrant entrepreneurs on the economy, the education of children, and the building of institutions.   It is the oldest tradition of scholarship related to entrepreneurship.

Week of:

March 22nd       John Sibley Butler and George Kozmetsky, “Immigrant and Minority Entrepreneurship, Introduction” to Margaret Levenstein, “African-American Entrepreneurship:  View from the 1910 Census” (Blackboard)

                        Saxenian and Edulbehram, “Immigrant Entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley” (Blackboard)

                 

March 29th         American Made:   The Impact of Immigrant Entrepreneurs on U.S. Competitiveness”, Sections 1 and II (Blackboard)

April 5th           “American Made:   The Impact of Immigrant Entrepreneurs on U.S. Competitiveness”, Section III (Blackboard)

Learning Objectives:  To understand how entrepreneurship can be related to the experiences of newcomers to market economies.  To examine and understand the contribution of immigrant and minority entrepreneurs to wealth creation and new venture development in America and around the globe; to understand the impact of entrepreneurship on families and the education of children.

 

Part V:  Introduction to Entrepreneurial Operation:  Staying Entrepreneurial

This section is concerned with staying focus once the enterprise is established.  It covers the importance of customers and testing new ideas. 

Week of

April 12th         Dorf and Byers, Chapters 11, 12, 13

April 19th         Dorf and Byers, Chapters 17, 18, 19

April 26th            Elevator speeches by class teams on BIG IDEAS

May 3rd           Elevator speeches by class teams on BIG IDEAS

 

 

 

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