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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Mounira Charrad

Ph.D., Harvard

Associate Professor
Mounira Charrad

Contact

Biography

Mounira (Maya) Charrad received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her undergraduate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris. Her research has centered on state formation, colonialism, law, citizenship, kinship and women’s rights. More specifically, she has considered strategies of state building in kin-based societies and how struggles over state power shaped the expansion or curtailment of women's rights. She is currently studying conceptions of modernity in legal discourses in the Middle East. Challenging explanations of politics based on a textual approach to religion, she offers instead a focus on social solidarities and where they are grounded (kinship, ethnicity, or other).  Her work has been translated into French and Arabic, and featured on websites and in the media. Her research has been funded by several grants including the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation, the American Association of University Women, and the American Institute of Maghribi Studies

Her book, States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco(University of California Press,2001)won the following awards:

  • Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, American Sociological Association.
  • Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award, American Political Science Association.
  • Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Award. Outstanding Book in Political Sociology, American Sociological Association, Section on Political Sociology.
  • Outstanding Scholarly Book in Any Field Hamilton Award, University of Texas at Austin.
  • Best First Book in the Field of History Award, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History, 2002.
  • Best Book in Sociology Komarosvky Award, Honorable Mention, Eastern Sociological Society, 2003.

Professor Charrad teaches courses on Comparative/Historical Methods; Political Sociology; Gender Politics in the Islamic World; The Veil:  History, Culture and Politics; Global Gender Inequality; and Gender and Development.

She is affiliated with the Center for European Studies; the Center for Middle East Studies; the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies; the Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice; and the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. She also holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Middle East Studies.

Selected other publications:

Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire, Mounira M. Charrad and Julia P. Adams, eds., Special Issue of Political Power and Social Theory, forthcoming.

 “Sustained Reforms of Islamic Family Law: Tunisia under Authoritarian Regimes, 1950s to 2010,” Mounira M. Charrad and Hyun Jeong Ha in Family Law and Gender in the Modern Middle East,Adrien Wing and Hisham Kassim (eds.), New York: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

“Limits of Empire:  The French Colonial State and Local Patrimonialism.”  Mounira M. Charrad and Daniel Jaster, in Mounira M. Charrad and Julia Adams, eds., Patrimonial Capitalism and Empire, special issue of Political Power and Social Theory, forthcoming. 

“From Colonialism to the Arab Spring:  Gender, Religion and State,” Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh in Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, Robert A. Scottand Stephen M. Kosslyn, eds, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, in press. 

“Equal or Complementary? Women in the New Tunisian Constitution after the Arab Spring,” Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh, Journal of North African Studies 19 (2), 2014.

"The Arab Spring and Women's Rights in Tunisia." Mounira M. Charrad and Amina Zarrugh.  E-International Relations, sept.4, 2014 http://www.e-ir.info/2013/09/04/the-arab-spring-and-womens-rights-in-tunisia/

 “Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State Building in Kin-Based Societies” in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, 2011.

Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, 2011.

“Gender in the Middle East: Islam, States, Agency,” Annual Review of Sociology. Vol 37. 2011.

 “Women’s Agency across Cultures:  Conceptualizing Strengths and Boundaries,” in Women’s Agency:  Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

Guest Editor, Women’s Agency: Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

“Kinship, Islam or Oil:  Culprits of Gender Inequality?” Politics and Gender (A Journal of the American Political Science Association). Vol. 5 (4), December 2009:  546-553.

“Tunisia at the Forefront of the Arab World:  Two Waves of Gender Legislation.”  Washington and Lee Law Review. Vol. 64 (4), Fall 2007:  1513-27 Revised and Reprinted in Women in the Middle East and North Africa: Agents of Changeedited by Fatima Sadiqi and Moha Ennaji.  New York: Routledge, 2010.

“Contexts, Concepts and Contentions:  Gender Legislation in the Middle East.”  Hawwa: Journal of Women in the Middle East and the Islamic World.  2007. Vol. 5 (1): 55-72.

“Unequal Citizenship:  Issues of Gender Justice in the Middle East and North Africa.”  In Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay, ed.,Gender Justice, Citizenship and Development, Ottawa, Canada:  International Development Research Centre, 2007.

"Becoming a Citizen:  Lineage Versus Individual in Morocco and Tunisia." In Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East, Suad Joseph, ed.  Syracuse, NY:  Syracuse University Press, 2000, pp. 70-87.  

"Policy Shifts:  State, Islam and Gender in Tunisia, 1930s -- 1990s."  In Social Politics, Summer 1997, Vol. 4 (2):  284-319. Expanded as “Continuity or Change:  Family Law and Family Structure in Tunisia.” With Allyson Goeken. In African Families at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, ed. By Yaw Oheneba-Sakyi and Baffour K. Takyi, Westport, CT:  Praeger, 2006; Revised and reprinted as “Family Law and Ideological Debates in Postcolonial Tunisia.” in Yount, K.M.and H. Rashad (eds.). Family in the Middle East: Ideational Change in Egypt, Iran, and Tunisia: Routledge, 2008.

Interests

Gender & Women's Rights; Political Sociology; Social Theory; Colonialism; Comparative-Historical Sociology; Globalization; Middle East and North Africa.

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

46375 • Fall 2014
Meets M 600pm-900pm CLA 1.302A
show description

Description:   

The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We pay particular attention to how evidence is used to construct theory. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology.  Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology. Thematically, the seminar focuses on states, state formation, and politics. We will invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

Grading Policy:

The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  A critique of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a research proposal 40%. Class participation  counts for10%. The proposal must draw closely on the seminar readings and at the same time help you formulate your future plans for research, whatever particular method you choose for it.

Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy                                   

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions                                                     

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights                                                 

Julia Adams, The Familial State

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

46465 • Spring 2014
Meets MW 400pm-530pm CLA 0.126
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 341 )
show description

Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world. It is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics. It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition. We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it. The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally.

Texts:

E.W. Fernea, Guests of The Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village. Anchor, (GS) 1965.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and

Morocco. Berkeley: Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence: French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley: UC Press 2006 (BTS).

Joni Seager, The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World. 4th ed. Penguin. 2009. (Atlas).

Articles will be placed on Blackboard.

Grading and Requirements:

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions. I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.

Exam 1 25%

Exam  2 40%

Exam 3 20%

Team presentation 10%

Class participation 5%

SOC 320K • Political Sociology

45725 • Spring 2013
Meets MW 300pm-430pm CLA 0.120
(also listed as MES 341 )
show description

Contains a Writing Flag

Course Description:

This course surveys classical theories and major contemporary debates in political sociology.  It is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the different theoretical perspectives on the study of power and politics. The empirical focus of the course includes the US and other countries and the approach is comparative-historical.  We consider issues such as state building, nations, civil society, political parties, elites, social movements, protest, and democracy.  We discuss recent developments both in the US and internationally. Students use major theories and concepts in Political Sociology to make analyze these events.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  This is a Writing Flag course that involves writing papers, revising them, and giving comments to your peers on their writing.  Course requirements include one position paper and 2 papers, a team presentation and participation in class discussions. Grading is as follows: Position Paper (500 words): 10%; Paper no. 1 (750 words):  20%; Paper no. 2 (1200 words):  40%; Team presentation: 10%; Class participation: 10 %; Peer review of papers: 10%.  

Papers are evaluated in terms of quality of research, depth of thought, strength of argument, and clarity of expression (i.e., writing style).  Presentations are done in teams.

Text/Readings:

Karl Marx, Communist Manifesto, On line at UT Library

Tocqueville, Democracy in America.  On line at UT Library. Author’s Introduction, chs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8. 

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.  One Line at UT library.  Preface, Intro, chs 1, 2, 4 a.  TO CHECK AND CONSIDER SHORTENING READING.

Dan Smith, The State of the World Atlas.  8th ed. Penguin. 2008 (Atlas).

Daniel Chirot, Contentious Identities:  Ethnic, Religious and Nationalist Conflicts in Today’s World. Routledge. 2011.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

M. M. Charrad, “Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State-building in Kin-based Societies.” In Patrimonial Power in the Modern World.  Annals, Vol 636, July 2011. On Line at UT Library.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course. They are used to cover current events.  

 

 

 

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

45920 • Spring 2013
Meets T 600pm-900pm CLA 1.302A
show description

Description:   

The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We pay particular attention to how evidence is used to construct theory. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology.  Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology. Thematically, the seminar focuses on states, state formation, and politics. We will invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

Grading Policy:

The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  A critique of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a research proposal 40%. Class participation  counts for10%. The proposal must draw closely on the seminar readings and at the same time help you formulate your future plans for research, whatever particular method you choose for it.

Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy                                   

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions                                                     

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights                                                 

Julia Adams, The Familial State        

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

45605 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm NOA 1.102
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 341, R S 358, WGS 340 )
show description

Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world. It is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics. It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition. We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it. The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally.

Texts:

E.W. Fernea, Guests of The Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village. Anchor, (GS) 1965.

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and

Morocco. Berkeley: Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence: French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley: UC Press 2006 (BTS).

Joni Seager, The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World. 4th ed. Penguin. 2009. (Atlas).

Articles will be placed on Blackboard.

Grading and Requirements:

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions. I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.

Exam 1 25%

Exam  2 40%

Exam 3 20%

Team presentation 10%

Class participation 5%

SOC 320K • Political Sociology

45500 • Spring 2012
Meets MW 300pm-430pm BUR 231
show description

Description:

This course surveys classical theories and major contemporary debates in political sociology.  It is designed to provide students with a general understanding of the different theoretical perspectives on the study of power and politics. The empirical focus of the course includes the US and other countries and the approach is comparative- historical.  We will discuss recent developments both in the US and internationally. Students are encouraged to use major theories and concepts in Political Sociology to make sense of these events.

Grading and requirement:

Midterm take home 40%

Research paper 40%

Two position papers discussing the readings 20% for both papers

Class participation is expected. The research paper is developed in stages during the course of the seminar on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor.

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

45605 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 1100am-1200pm ENS 109
(also listed as ISL 373, MES 322K, WGS 340 )
show description

Course Description:

The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world.  It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition.  We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it.  The focus is on women's rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally. The course is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic tradition and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics.

Course Requirements and Grading Policy:  

Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  

Exam 1 30%

Exam 2 30%

Country Report 20%

Team presentation 10%

Class participation 10%  

Text/Readings

M. M. Charrad, States and Women's Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001.

Mernissi, Fatema. Scheherazade Goes West: Different Cultures, Different Harems. New York: Washington Square Press, 2001.

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence:  French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley:  UC Press 2006

Articles are listed on relevant weeks on the syllabus.  They will be placed on Blackboard.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course and will be covered in the exams.  

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

45540 • Fall 2011
Meets T 600pm-900pm BUR 480
show description

Description:   The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We pay particular attention to how evidence is used to construct theory. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology.  Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology.  Thematically, the seminar focuses on states, state formation, and politics. We will invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

 Grading Policy:

The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  A critique of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a research proposal 40%. Class participation  counts for10%. The proposal must draw closely on the seminar readings at the same time as it help you formulate your future plans for research, whatever particular method you choose.

 Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy                                   

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions                                                            

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights                                                            

Julia Adams, The Familial State                                                                       

Rogers Brubaker, Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany

Three highly recommended edited collections: 

There are three edited collections which I see as key in the field.  They offer a combination of pieces practicing CHS and other than comment on various dimensions of the method.  Please consult them in the course of the semester. These edited collections are on reserve at PCL for our course.  They are:

 Skocpol,  Theda, ed.  1984.  Vision and Method in Historical Sociology.  New York: Cambridge University Press.

Mahoney, James, and Dietrich Rueschemeyer. Editors, 2003. Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Adams,Julia, Elizabeth Clemens and Ann Orloff. Eds. 2005. Remaking Modernity: Politics, History, and Sociology.  Durham, NC. : Duke University Press.

Books for reference:

Brubaker, Rogers. Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe.

Wallerstein, Immanuel.  The Modern World System                                                             

Tilly, Charles, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons

Mahoney, James. The Legacies of Liberalism: Path Dependence and Political Regimes in Central America.

Orfoff, Ann.  The Politics of Pensions

Skocpol, Theda.  Protecting Soldiers and Mothers

Hall, John R. with Philip D. Schuyler and Sylvaine Trinh. 2000. Apocalypse Observed: Religious Movements and Violence in North America, Europe, and Japan. London: Routledge.

Lachmann, Richard. 2000. Capitalists in Spite of Themselves: Elite Conflict and European Transitions in Early Modern Europe. New York: Oxford University Press.

websites:

A useful resource is the website of the Comparative and Historical Sociology of ASA. <http://www2.asanet.org/sectionchs/>.   It includes in particular a list of journals that you should find useful for this seminar and for possible places to publish your comparative historical research in the future. 

SOC 388L • Historical And Comparatv Meths

46535 • Spring 2010
Meets T 600pm-900pm BUR 480
show description

COMPARATIVE AND HISTORICAL METHODS

 

January 2010

 

Professor Mounira Maya Charrad                                               

Spring 2010, Tu 6-9, Bur 480

SOC 388L.  Unique Number 46535.

Office: Burdine 552, Office Hours: Tues 4.00 -5.30 and by appointment.

Tel. 232 6311, email: charrad@austin.utexas.edu

Mailbox:  Sociology Department Office, Burdine 5th floor.

 

The University of Texas at Austin will provide upon request academic accommodations to qualified students with disabilities.  For more information, call the office of the Dean of students at 471 6259.

 

Course Description:  The course is devoted to the study of comparative and historical methods in sociology (CHS). It is designed to provide graduate students with a general understanding of the theoretical paradigms that scholars have developed in that genre of sociology. We will be reading closely books that span five decades of comparative and historical sociology and have received attention in the field. All these books are meant as exemplars that “do” comparative and historical sociology. Each of them puts the methodology in practice to study a substantive sociological issue. Our purpose is to deconstruct each text in order to understand how the author has used comparisons implicitly or explicitly (in most cases) in order to build a theoretical argument.  It is also to play close attention to the sources and type of data used.  In addition, we will consider articles that comment on comparative and historical methods.  These articles should help you develop an intellectual map of the analytic strategies displayed in the books we are using as exemplars of the methodology.  We will also invite guest speakers who use comparative/historical methods to come and tell us about their work from time to time.  An updated syllabus will be provided as necessary.

 

Course Requirements:  The course meets one a week and attendance is required. The first requirement is to do the readings and to come to class prepared to discuss them.  Students will also be asked to lead designated class discussions.  The second requirement is in the form of two written pieces. The course grade depends upon the following:  Critiques of readings with oral presentations 25%, a take home midterm 25 %, a final paper 40%, and class participation 10%. With instructor’s approval, you may substitute a research proposal for the final paper as long as the proposal draws closely on the seminar readings.

 

Texts Required:

B. Moore Jr, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy.  1966.  Beacon Press.

T. Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions. 1979. Cambridge Univ Press              

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights. 2001. California Univ Press            

J. Adams, The Familial State2005. Cornell Univ Press.              

R. Brubaker. Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany.1998. Harvard U Pr.

 

Recommended: 

There are three edited collections which I see as key in the field.  They offer a combination of pieces practicing CHS and other than comment on various dimensions of the method.  Please consult them in the course of the semester. These edited collections are on reserve at PCL for our course.  The book by Tilly offers methodological suggestions.

 

Skocpol,  Theda, ed.  1984.  Vision and Method in Historical Sociology.  New York:              Cambridge University Press.

Mahoney, James, and Dietrich Rueschemeyer. Editors, 2003. Comparative Historical             Analysis in the Social Sciences. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Adams,Julia, Elizabeth Clemens and Ann Orloff. Eds. 2005. Remaking Modernity:              Politics, History, and Sociology.  Durham, NC. : Duke University Press.

Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons. 1989.  New York:  Russell Sage.

 

Journals and websites:

Specific journals you may wish to consult are AJS, ASR, Comparative Studies in History and Society, Theory and Society, Sociological Theory.  You may only find a few relevant articles in ASR especially and in AJS, but those that appear there are important for you to read.  The other journals are likely to publish more in CHS.

A very useful resource is the website of the Comparative and Historical Sociology of ASA. <http://www2.asanet.org/sectionchs/>.   It includes in particular a list of journals that you should find useful for this seminar and for possible places to publish your comparative historical research in the future.

You may also want to look at Trajectories, the ASA CHS Section Newsletter with publishes brief articles on the state of the art and topics of the day.

 

Additional Information:

  • You are encouraged to study together and do collaborative projects, but anything you write can only be your own.
  • There will be no incomplete.
  • Assignments are expected by the due date at the beginning of class, and points will be taken out for lateness.
  • Guest lectures are an integral part of the course to be included in your discussions of relevant topics and in exams.
  • More than one unexcused absence will result in a lower grade.

 

 

Jan  19:  Introduction

 

Jan 26:  OVERVIEW OF CHS.

J. Mahoney and G. Goertz, “A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research” in Political Analysis (2006) 14:227–249. (on Blackboard).

 

J. Mahoney and D. Rueschemeyer, “Comparative Historical Analysis:  Achievements and Agendas.” In Mahoney and Rueschemeyer, eds., Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social Sciences, Cambridge University Press. (book is on line, Goggle Scholar).

 

Mounira M. Charrad, “Teaching Comparative and Historical Sociology:  Challenges and new Directions.” Trajectories, Fall 2007. (on line).

 

Mounira M. Charrad, “Waves of Comparative and Historical Sociology.”  Essay on Remaking Modernity by J. Adams, E. Clemens and A. Orloff.  International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 2006, Vol 47 (5):  351-358.  (On line UT Library Website).

 

Feb  2 -16:  CLASSIC FOUNDATION: BASES OF DEMOCRACY AND DICTATORSHIP

Moore, Social Origins

 

Skocpol, Theda, “A Critical Review of Barrington Moore’s Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy.”  Politics and Society 4 (Fall 1973):  1-34.

 

Cedric de Leon’s "'No Bourgeois Mass Party, No Democracy': The Missing Link in Barrington Moore's American Civil War." Political Power and Social Theory Volume 19, 2008 (received the Barrington Moore Jr. Prize for best article from the CHS Section of ASA).

 

Feb 16:  Your preliminary outline on ideas for your research proposal is due.

 

Feb 23 –March 2:   METHOD OF AGREEMENT.  REVOLUTIONS:  WHAT DID CHINA, FRANCE AND RUSSIA HAVE IN COMMON.

Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions 

 

March 9:  Guest Lecture:  TBA

 

March 16:  Spring Break

 

March 23:   METHOD OF DIFFERENCE.   STATES AND PATHS TO GENDER POLICY:  HOW DID TUNISIA, ALGERIA AND MOROCCO DIFFER?

Charrad, States and Women’s Rights

 

March 30:  METHOD OF DIFFERENCE (CONTINUED).

Charrad, States and Women’s Rights

 

Dan Slater, “Critical Antecedents and Informative Regress” (with Erica Simmons). Qualitative Methods 6:1 (Spring 2008), pp. 6-13.  (Photocopied).

 

March 30: Take Home Exam Due in Class.

 

April 6-13:  HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF A KEY CASE:  HOW DID THE FIRST EUROPEAN STATE DEVELOP?

Adams, Familial State

 

April 13: Two page (double space) Proposal Outline Due in Class

                                      

April 20:  STATES, CULTURE AND PATHS TO CITIZENSHIP:  DIFFERENT STORIES IN FRANCE AND GERMANY

Brubaker, Citizenship and Nationhood.

 

Brubaker, William Rogers, 1990, Immigration, Citizenship, and the Nation-State in France and Germany: A comparative historical analysis.”  International Sociology, 5(4):379-407.

 

April 27:  HOW TO DO ARTICLES WITH CHS

 

Prasad, Monica, “Why Is France So French? Culture, Institutions, and Neoliberalism, 1974– 1981.” AJS Volume 111 Number 2 (September 2005): 357–407 (Winner of a CHS Award).

 

Adams, Julia. 1996. Principals and Agents, Colonialists and Company

Men: The Decay of Colonial Control in the Dutch East Indies. American Sociological Review. 61 (1): 12-28.

 

May 4:  PRESENTATION OF PROPOSALS.

 

May 7:  PROPOSALS DUE

 

Books for reference:

 

Brubaker, Rogers. Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question         in the New Europe.

Wallerstein, Immanuel.  The Modern World System                                                          

Mahoney, James. The Legacies of Liberalism: Path Dependence and Political Regimes in Central America.

Orfoff, Ann.  The Politics of Pensions

Skocpol, ThedaProtecting Soldiers and Mothers

Hall, John R. with Philip D. Schuyler and Sylvaine Trinh. 2000. Apocalypse Observed: Religious Movements and Violence in North America, Europe, and Japan. London: Routledge.

Lachmann, Richard. 2000. Capitalists in Spite of Themselves: Elite Conflict and European Transitions in Early Modern Europe. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

 

 

SOC 395G • Gender And Development

46765 • Fall 2009
Meets T 600pm-900pm BUR 231
(also listed as MES 381, WGS 393 )
show description

The course is devoted to the study of gender and development from a comparative perspective.  Attention is paid to patterns of gender inequality, state policies relevant to gender, and women’s movements in different countries.  Although our discussions draw on the literature in the West for the purpose of comparison, the emphasis is on gender in the context of social organization, culture and politics in societies in the rest of the world. The topics we explore include the legacy of colonialism on gender debates, the effect of globalization on women’s roles, the place of gender in the redefinition of citizenship and civil society, and the interaction between local/national movements and the international discourse of women’s rights.  Students may choose to focus their own work in the seminar on a given country or on intra-region and international comparisons.

The field of inquiry “Gender and Development” is located at the intersection of development studies and gender studies, both of which can be understood in many different ways.  The concept of development in particular has been used to mean processes ranging from long term macrostructural trajectories to micro level community programs in developing countries. This semester, the theoretical focus is on the intersection between broad sociological processes and gender issues, especially between political processes and gender, and the geographic focus is on the Middle East and Latin America. A major theme of the seminar is that development cannot be understood in economic terms only or even primarily and that the cultural and the political must be included in the concept. 

In the course of discussing substantive issues addressed in each reading, we will consider the methodology used by different authors and compare the advantages and limitations of comparative-historical research, surveys, interviews, participant observation, and other methods in the study of development and gender.  The research proposal (see below) should specify not only the question to be investigated but also the research method.

Course Requirements:  The course meets once a week and attendance is required. The course grade is based upon the following:  Position Papers/Critiques of Readings 10%, Class Presentations 10%, a take home midterm 30 % and a Research Proposal 50% (topic selected after consultation with the instructor). 

Required Texts:

Charrad, Mounira M. States and Women’s Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco, UC Press, 2001.

Myra Marx Ferree and Aila Mari Tripp, Global Feminism:  Transnational Women’s Activism, Organizing, and Human Rights New York U Press, 2006.

Rodriguez, Victoria. Women in Contemporary Mexican Politics, UT Press, 2003.

Seager, Joni:  The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World, Penguin, 2003.

Selected articles photocopied and available for purchase as a course packet at Paradigm (24th street)

Recommended:

  • Visvanathan, Nalini: et. al., eds, The Women, Gender and Development Reader, 2000
  • Htun, Mala. Sex and the State:  Abortion, Divorce, and the Family Under Latin American Dictatorships and Democracies. Cambridge Univ. Press, 2003.
  • World Bank, Gender and Development in the Middle East and North Africa:  Women in the Public Sphere, World Bank Publications, 2004.
  • B. Ehrenreich and A R Hochschild, eds.  Global WomenNannies, Maids and Sex Workers in the New Economy, Metropolitan Books, 2003.
  • R Datta & J Kornberg, eds, Women in Developing Countries:  Assessing Strategies for Empowerment, Lynne Rienner Pub, 2002.
  • Ronald Inglehart and Pippa Norris, Rising Tide:  Gender Equality and Cultural Change around the World,Cambridge U Press, 2003.

Journals to Consult

AJS, ASR, Gender and Society, Theory and Society, Sociological Theory, Social Politics, Women’s Studies International Forum, Signs.

SOC 336G • Gender Polit In Islamic World

45705 • Spring 2009
Meets MW 300pm-430pm PHR 2.114
(also listed as MES 322K, R S 358, WGS 340 )
show description

                       GENDER POLITICS IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD

SPRING 2009

Course Description:   The course is designed to help students gain a better knowledge of the Islamic world and, at the same time, increase their understanding of major sociological concepts such as gender, social organization, culture, and politics.  The course is devoted to the study of gender politics in the Islamic world.  It shows how culture is mediated by politics, resulting in diverse interpretations of the cultural tradition and in different policies with respect to gender. We start by examining the themes and issues that are part of the common denominator of the Islamic tradition.  We then consider how the diversity can be explained and what factors contribute to it.  The focus is on women’s rights, which have been a key political issue in several countries and internationally.

 Course Requirements and Grading Policy:  Students are encouraged to take an active role in discussing readings and raising questions.  I expect students to attend class and to complete the assigned readings prior to coming to class.  Course Requirements include 2 exams, a country report, a team presentation and participation in class discussions. Grading is as follows: Exam no.1:  40%; Exam no.2: 25%; Country Report 15%; Team presentation: 10%; Class participation: 10%. 

Text/Readings:

M. M. Charrad, States and Women’s Rights:  The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley:  Univ of California Press, 2001 (SWR)

Mernissi, Fatema. Scheherazade Goes West: Different Cultures, Different Harems. New York: Washington Square Press, 2001.

Fadela Amara, Breaking the Silence:  French Voices from the Ghetto. Berkeley:  UC Press 2006

Articles will be placed on Blackboard.

Audiovisuals:

Audiovisuals are an integral part of the course and will be covered in the exams. 

Publications

Patrimonialism and Imperial Strategy, Mounira M. Charrad and Julia P. Adams, eds., Special Issue of Political Power and Social Theory, forthcoming.

 “Sustained Reforms of Islamic Family Law: Tunisia under Authoritarian Regimes, 1950s to 2010,” Mounira M. Charrad and Hyun Jeong Ha in Family Law and Gender in the Modern Middle East,Adrien Wing and Hisham Kassim (eds.), New York: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming.

"Patrimonialism, Past and Present:  An Introduction" Mounira M. Charrad and Julia P. Adams in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds., Bol 636 of the Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences.  New York, NY:  Sage.  July 2011.

“Central and Local Patrimonialism:  State Building in Kin-Based Societies” in Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, forthcoming in 2011.

Patrimonial Power in the Modern World, Julia P. Adams and Mounira M. Charrad, eds, Vol. 636 of The Annals, The American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. New York, NY: Sage, forthcoming in 2011.

“Gender in the Middle East: Islam, States, Agency,” Annual Review of Sociology. Vol 37. Forthcoming 2011.

“Women’s Agency across Cultures:  Conceptualizing Strengths and Boundaries,” in Women’s Agency:  Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

Guest Editor, Women’s Agency: Silences and Voices, Special issue, Women’s Studies International Forum, Vol. 33 (6), December 2010.

“Kinship, Islam or Oil:  Culprits of Gender Inequality?” Politics and Gender (A Journal of the American Political Science Association). Vol. 5 (4), December 2009: 546-553.

“Tunisia at the Forefront of the Arab World:  Two Waves of Gender Legislation.”  Washington and Lee Law Review. Vol. 64 (4), Fall 2007:  1513-27 Revised and Reprinted in Women in the Middle East and North Africa: Agents of Change, edited by Fatima Sadiqi and Moha Ennaji.  New York: Routledge, 2010.

Charrad, M. (2007, September) Contexts, Concepts and Contentions: Gender Legislation in the Middle East. Hawwa: Journal of Women in the Middle East and the Islamic World, 5(1), 55-72.

Charrad, Mounira M. (2001) States and Women's Rights: The Making of Postcolonial Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Charrad, M. M. (1997, June) Policy Shifts: State, Islam and Gender in Tunisia, 1930s -- 1990s. Social Politics, 4(2), 284-319. Expanded s "Continuity or Change:  Family Law and Family Structure in Tunisia." with Allyson Goeken. In African Families at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century, ed.by Yaw Oheneba-Sakyi and Baffour K. Takyi. Westort, CT:  Praeger, 2006.  Revised and reprinted as "Family Law and Ideological Debates in Postcolonial Tunisia." in K.M. Yount and H. Rashad, eds. Family in the Middle East: Ideational Change in Egypt, Iran and Tunisia: Routledge, 2008.

Charrad, M. & Pieper, C. (2008, December) The Sociology of Islam: ASA Session Brings Fresh Perspective. Newsletter of the Sociology of Religion Section of the American Sociological Association, 9(2), 5-8.

Patrimonial States in Early Modern Europe and in the Contemporary Era: Similarities? Essay on the Familial State by J. Adams.  Poltiical Power and Social Theory.  2008. Vol 19: 243-251.

Charrad, M. (2007, September) Teaching Comparative and Historical Sociology: Challenges and New Directions. Trajectories, Newsletter of the Comparative and Historical Sociology Section of the American Sociological Association, 19(1).

Charrad, M. (2007) Unequal Citizenship: Issues of Gender Justice in the Middle East and North Africa. In M. Mukhopadhyay (Ed.), Gender Justice, Citizenship and Development. Ottawa, Canada: International Development Research Centre.

Charrad, M. (2006, September) Waves of Comparative and Historical Sociology, Essay on Remaking Modernity. International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 47(5), 351-358.

Charrad, M. & Goeken, A. (2006) Continuity or Change: Family Law and Family Structure in Tunisia. In Y. Oheneba-Sakyi & B.K. Takyi (Eds.), African Families at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Charrad, M. (2006, March) Rulers and Families, Review essay on The Familial State: Ruling Families and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe. Comparative and Historical Sociology Section Newsletter 17(2).

Charrad, M. (2005, December) Broadening the Discourse: States in Kin-based Societies. Political Sociology: States, Power, and Societies, 12(1), 8-9.

Charrad, M. (2004, September) Code of Personal Status, Tunisia. Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa, 4 vols. 2d ed., Philip Mattar ed., Macmillan Reference USA, 2230-2231.

Charrad, M. (2003, March) Why study Colonialism?. Comparative and Historical Sociology, 15(1), 18-21.

"State and Gender in the Maghrib." In Women and Power in the Middle East, Suad Joseph and Susan Slyomovics, eds., Philadelphia:  University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001, pp. 61-71. Revised and Updated.  Initially published In Middle East Report, March-April, 1990, pp. 19-24.

Charrad, M. (2000) Becoming a Citizen: Lineage Versus Individual in Morocco and Tunisia. In S. Joseph (Ed.), Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East (pp.70-87). Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.

Charrad, M. (1999, June) Bringing in Tribe: Beyond a State/Class Paradigm. Comparative and Historical Sociology, 11(3), 1-3.

Charrad, M. (1998) Cultural Diversity Within Islam: Veils and Laws in Tunisia. In H. Bodman & N. Tohidi (Eds.), Women in Muslim Societies: Diversity Within Unity (pp.63-79). Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.

Charrad, M. (1996) Femmes, Culture et Societe. Casablanca, Morocco: Afrique Orient. Vol. 1.  Femmes, Culture et Famille.

Charrad, M. (1996) Femmes, Culture et Societe. Casablanca, Morocco: Afrique Orient. Vol. 2. Femmes, Pouvoir Politique et Developpement.

Charrad, M., Bourqia, R. & Gallagher, N. (1996) Femmes au Maghreb: Perspectives et Questions. In Femmes, Culture et Societe (pp.9-14). Casablanca, Morocco: Afrique Orient.

Charrad, M. (1995, November) Review of Gender and National Identity: Women and Politics in Muslim Societies. Contemporary Sociology 24(6).

Charrad, M. (1994) Repudiation versus Divorce: Responses to State Policy in Tunisia. In E. Chow & C. Berheide (Eds.), Women, the Family and Policy: A Global Perspective (pp.51-69). State University of New York Press.

Charrad, M. (1987, March) Review of Women and the Family in the Middle East: New Voices of Change. Contemporary Sociology 16(2).

Awards and Achievements

Selected professional and scholarly awards and achievements include:

Council Member (elected), Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology, American Sociological Association, 2011-14.

Editorial Board, Contemporary Sociology, 2011-present.

National Endowment for the Humanities, Faculty Fellowship for Research, Sept 2010-June 2011.

American Institute of Maghrebi Studies, Grant for Field Research in Tunisia, 2009- 2010.

Advisor, Survey of Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa, Freedom House, New York, 2009 and 2004.

Distinguished Service to the Tunisian American Community Ibn Khaldun Award, 2005.  In recognition of “bringing a better understanding of Tunisian society, history, and culture to American universities, students, and educated public.”

Associate Editor, Editorial Board, Sociological Theory, 2006-Present.

Editorial Board, Politics and Gender, 2007-present

International Selection Committee, Middle East Research Competition, Ford Foundation, 2006-08.

Editorial Advisory Board, Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, 2004-present.

Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, American Sociological Association. 2004.

Best Book on Politics and History Greenstone Award, American Political Science Association. 2003.

Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Award. Outstanding Book in Political Sociology, American Sociological Association, Section on Political Sociology.

Outstanding Scholarly Book in Any Field Hamilton Award, University of Texas at Austin. 2002.

Best First Book in the Field of History Award, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History, 2002.

Best Book in Sociology Komarosvky Award, Honorable Mention, Eastern Sociological Society, 2003.

American Sociological Association-National Science Foundation Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline Grant, 2004.

Best Book in Sociology Komarosvky Award, Honorable Mention, Eastern Sociological Society, 2003.

Council Member (elected), Section on Comparative and Historical Sociology, American Sociological Association, December 1999-2003.

Board of Directors, American Institute of Maghribi Studies, 1999- 2003.                                        

Chair (elected), Faculty Advisory Committee (Editorial Board), University of Texas Press, 2006-07.

Honorary Member, Phi Alpha Theta International Honor Society in History, 2002 – present.

International Advisory Board Member, Journal of North African Studies, 1997-present.

 

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