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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Christine L Williams

Ph.D., University of California - Berkeley

Professor
Christine L Williams

Contact

Biography

Research

Dr. Christine Williams is professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin.  She writes on gender, race, and class inequality in the workplace.  Her most recent book, Inside Toyland:  Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality, exposes how these forms of inequality are embedded within consumer culture through an examination of low-wage retail work.  Two previous books focus specifically on gender discrimination at work.  These prior works were based on studies of men and women in nontraditional (gender atypical) occupations, such as men in nursing and women in the U.S. Marine Corps.  She has also studied sexuality, homophobia, and sexual harassment in a wide variety of workplace settings. A co-edited book, Gender & Sexuality in the Workplace, was published in 2010.  She is currently conducting a study (with Professor Chandra Muller) on scientists and engineers in the oil and gas industry.  Dr. Williams edited the journal, Gender and Society, from 2003-06. She chaired the Department of Sociology from 2010-14.

Professor Williams teaches course in gender, sexualities, labor and labor movements, and qualitative research methods. She is on leave during the fall, 2014.

Research Subject Headings: Gender, Inequality, Labor, Sexuality

Affiliated Research/Academic Unit


Conference Panel Celebrates Sociologist's Work

posted: Tuesday July 20, 2010

At a recent conference in California, sociologist Christine Williams discussed the broad themes and motivations of her scholarly work in the company of distinguished scholars and honored guests.

SOC 395G • Readings In Gender & Sexuality

46650 • Spring 2014
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 1.302A
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

This graduate seminar is designed to provide a forum for discussion of recently published books in the sociology of gender and sexuality.  It assumes a graduate-level understanding of sociology and feminist theory.  Readings are organized thematically around the major social institutions, i.e., family, work, religion, politics.  Instructor permission required.

 

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

46215 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 800am-930am GSB 2.122
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world.

Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Kristen Schilt, Just one of the guys?, University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank‐Mu.oz, Transnational Tortillas: Race, Gender, and Shop‐Floor Politics in Mexico

and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

The Education of Shelby Knox (DVD).

Grading and Requirement:

Grades in the class will be based on three examinations and four homework assignments. The

first two exams are worth 30 percent, and the third is worth 20 percent of the final grade. All

examinations will have an essay format (Blue Books are required). Make‐up examinations will

be given only to those absent for university‐approved reasons. The final 20 percent of the grade

is based on written homework assignments. The assignments require students to write 2‐page

essays. Essay questions will be distributed in class and posted on Blackboard. They will be due

the following class period. No late assignments will be accepted. Evaluations (letter grades) are based on mastery of the material and quality of the writing.

 

SOC 395G • Gender And Society

45990 • Spring 2013
Meets M 1200pm-300pm CLA 1.302A
show description

This course examines the social construction of gender inequality, paying special attention to how divisions by race, class, and sexuality contribute to (and occasionally undercut) men’s power and privilege over women.  We will also focus on moments of resistance and change in gender arrangements. 

 

The course is intended for graduate students in sociology, and assumes a graduate-level understanding of sociological theory and methods.  Course readings include classic and contemporary works in theory and research on the sociology of gender.  The course is designed to assist graduate students who are preparing to take the comprehensive examination in gender. 

 

 

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45590 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 800am-930am GSB 2.122
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world.

Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Kristen Schilt, Just one of the guys?, University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank‐Mu.oz, Transnational Tortillas: Race, Gender, and Shop‐Floor Politics in Mexico

and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

The Education of Shelby Knox (DVD).

Grading and Requirement:

Grades in the class will be based on three examinations and four homework assignments. The

first two exams are worth 30 percent, and the third is worth 20 percent of the final grade. All

examinations will have an essay format (Blue Books are required). Make‐up examinations will

be given only to those absent for university‐approved reasons. The final 20 percent of the grade

is based on written homework assignments. The assignments require students to write 2‐page

essays. Essay questions will be distributed in class and posted on Blackboard. They will be due

the following class period. No late assignments will be accepted. Evaluations (letter grades) are based on mastery of the material and quality of the writing.

 

SOC 388K • Field And Observational Meths

45705 • Spring 2012
Meets W 300pm-600pm BUR 214
show description

Course Description

This course is an in-depth analysis of qualitative research methodologies in sociology.  The goals of this course are (1) to examine the philosophy and epistemology of qualitative methods, (2) to familiarize students with the range of qualitative research methods, including ethnography, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, and qualitative content analysis, (3) to explore the strengths and limitations of these methods in contrast to quantitative methods, and (4) to develop the skills to design a qualitative research project; gather, record, and analyze qualitative data; and publish qualitative research.

 Course Requirements

This course is restricted to graduate students in sociology, and to those with significant background in social science research (instructor permission required for non-sociologists).  Students are required to attend class, complete all reading assignments on time, participate in class discussion, and lead one class discussion.  Course grades will be based on the following:

1.  Attendance, participation, and presentation (10%).

2.  Assignments (15%).  Students are required to complete three homework assignments.  All students are required to complete assignment #1, plus two additional assignments, depending on interest and research focus.

3.  Group Presentation (25%).  All students will participate in a student-directed group project.  You will be required to conduct fieldwork and qualitative interviews in collaboration with a group of fellow students.  Each group will make a formal presentation to the class, discussing the methodological and practical issues they confronted in designing a study, gathering data, and analyzing results.

 4.   A final 10-15 page paper (50%).  The final paper requires you to design your own qualitative research study, but not carry it out.  Your project will be evaluated on how well you justify your study, both theoretically and methodologically.  You may use your group project experience as the basis of your paper, or you can use the paper as a draft of your proposal for your Master’s thesis or Doctoral dissertation, or the methods chapter in your thesis or dissertation.

 Late papers will be penalized one full grade for every class day missed.

 Required Books

TBA

Emerson et al., Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes (Chicago, 1995).

Articles available on Blackboard, or through the library catalog

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45420 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 800am-930am CBA 4.328
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world. 

Required Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You're a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Christine Williams, Still a Man's World, Univ. of California Press, 1995.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas:  Race, Gender, and Shop-Floor Politics in Mexico and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

 

SOC 395G • Readings In Gender & Sexuality

46340 • Spring 2011
Meets W 1200pm-300pm BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

This course offers an overview of sociological theory and research on gender and sexuality.  The first part focuses on the history of sociological theory on gender and sexuality, followed by a discussion of classic works on the subject.  The second half of the class will concentrate on new works and current debates.  Among the topics we discuss are:  gay and lesbian families; (trans)gender in the workplace; transnational sex work.

 

Students are expected to have a basic background in sociology and/or feminist theory prior to taking this class.  Enrollment is limited to sociology graduate students.  Others must request special written permission from the instructor to enroll in the class.

 

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

45575 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 800am-930am CBA 4.328
(also listed as WGS 322 )
show description

Description:

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, sexuality, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women around the world. 

Required Texts:

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You're a Fag, Univ. of California Press, 2007.

Christine Williams, Still a Man's World, Univ. of California Press, 1995.

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, Univ. of California Press, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, Univ. of California Press, 2005.

Carolina Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas:  Race, Gender, and Shop-Floor Politics in Mexico and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

 


SOC 395G • Sociology Of Gender

46620 • Spring 2010
Meets M 1200-300pm BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Description: 

This seminar is designed to help students understand of the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. In this seminar we examine both theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Topics to be discussed include changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. Because many articles we will read involve statistical analyses, students are expected to be able to read and understand quantitative sociological research at the level of SOC385L or the equivalent. While a large proportion of the readings are based on research in the United States, international comparisons of women’s economic roles also constitute an important part of this seminar. In particular, we address how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men’s and women’s economic opportunities and thus the degree of gender inequality in the society.    Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned readings prior to the class period during which we will discuss the material. Active participation in class discussions is also required. 

Texts:

The required texts for this course includes books and articles from peer-reviewed sociological journals. The list below shows some of the books required for this course:  

Goldin, Claudia. 1990. Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women. Oxford University Press.

Charles, Maria. and David B. Grusky. 2004. Occupational Ghetto: The Worldwide Segregation of Men and Women. Stanford University Press.

Ogasawara, Yuko. 1998. Office Ladies and Salaried Men: Power, Gender, and Work in Japanese Companies. University of California. 

SOC 333K • Sociology Of Gender

46570 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 800-930 CBA 4.328
show description

The Sociology of Gender

Sociology 333K (46570)

Women's Studies 322 (48705)

Fall 2009

 

Professor C. Williams

Burdine 526

Office hours Thursdays 3:30-5:30 and by appointment

232-6321

 

T.A.  Kristine Kilanski

Email:  Kristine.kilanski@gmail.com

 

This course examines the social and cultural construction of gender, focusing on women and men in U.S. society.  We will explore how gender is experienced by different groups of men and women, with a focus on race/ethnicity, class, and nationality.  The course begins with description of current gender stereotypes in popular culture, and differences in the socialization and education of girls and boys.  Next we will examine gender differences in the workplace, exploring the reasons for the persistent gap in pay between employed men and women.  The third part of the course examines women’s changing relationship to the home and work, including changes in the meanings of marriage and motherhood, with a focus on the lives of impoverished women.  This section also reviews public policy responses to women’s poverty.  The final part of the course examines the impact of globalization on men and women workers.  The course concludes with a discussion of the contemporary feminist movement, and its goal of improving the social conditions of all women.

 

Required Texts

 

C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, 2007.

Christine Williams, Still a Man’s World, 1995

Susan Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, 2006.

Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas, Promises I can keep, 2005.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, Domestica, 2001.

 

Course Requirements

 

You must have completed at least 60 hours (junior standing) to take this class.  Students who do not meet this prerequisite will be dropped from the course.

 

Students are required to attend all lectures and complete all reading assignments on time.  You are assigned to read approximately 100-150 pages per week.  Many of the readings for the class are difficult so you should not underestimate the amount of time necessary to finish your assignments.

 

Grades in the class will be based on three examinations.  The first two are worth 30 percent, and the third is worth 20 percent of the final grade.  All examinations will have an essay format (Blue Books are required).  Evaluations are based on the mastery of the material and the quality of the writing.  Make-up examinations will be given only to those absent for university-approved reasons.

 

The remaining 20 percent of the grade will be based on periodic written assignments.  These assignments will not be announced in advance:  You must be present in class the day of the assignment to receive it.  They will be due the following class period. 

 

Academic misconduct of any sort will not be tolerated.  Any student found guilty of cheating will receive an F in the course.

 

I am available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, you may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students, Services for Students with Disabilities.

 

Weekly Topics and Assignments

 

I.  Sex and Gender.

 

August 27:  Introduction.

 

September 1-3:  Gender Socialization and Popular Culture.

            Reading: Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, pp. 1-83.

 

September 8-10:  Gender Education in Schools

            Reading: Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag, pp. 84-174.

 

II.  Gender Differences at Work

 

September 15-17:  Economic Inequality

            Reading:  Williams, Still a Man’s World, pp. 1-108.

 

September 22-29:  Policy responses to the Wage Gap

            Reading:  Williams, Still a Man’s World, pp. 109-188.

 

October 1:  FIRST EXAMINATION

 

III.            Gender Differences at Home

 

October 6-13:  Historical Changes in the Gender Division of Labor

            Reading: Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, pp. 15-78

 

October 15-20:  Feminization of Poverty

            Reading: Thistle, From Marriage to the Market, pp. 79-184.

 

October 22-27:  Unwed motherhood

            Reading:  Edin and Kefalas, Promises I can keep, pp. 1-103.

            Film: “The Education of Shelby Knox” (DVD 3839)

 

October 29-November 3:  Changing meanings of marriage and motherhood

            Reading:  Edin and Kefalas, Promises I can keep, pp. 104-220.

 

November 5: Gender and Violence

 

November 10:  SECOND EXAMINATION

 

IV.  Divisions between women:  Race/ethnicity, Class, and Nationality

 

November 12-17: International division of reproductive labor

            Reading: Hondagneu-Sotelo, Domestica, pp. 1-113.

 

November 19: Conflicts between women:  Domestic workers and their employers

            Reading: Hondagneu-Sotelo, Domestica, pp. 114-209.

 

November 24:  Feminism for everyone.

            Reading: Hondagneu-Sotelo, Domestica, pp. 210-243.

 

November 26:  THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

 

December 1:  Review

 

December 3: THIRD EXAMINATION

 

SOC 359 • Labor And Labor Movements

46610 • Fall 2009
Meets TTH 930-1100 CBA 4.344
show description

Labor and Labor Movements

Sociology 359 (46610)

Fall 2009

 

Professor C. Williams

Burdine 526

Office hours Thurs 3:30-5:30 and by appointment

232-6321

 

In the United States, our economic system of capitalism is often at odds with our political system of democracy.  Workers frequently must fight their employers for basic rights in the workplace.  But is conflict between capitalists and labor inevitable?  Is democratic capitalism possible?  What are the roles of the state, social movements, and labor unions in promoting democracy in the workplace? 

 

This course explores the evolving relationship between capitalism and democracy, starting with an overview of the major sociological theories of work.  Next we turn to an analysis of globalization, and its consequences for democracy and social inequality for workers around the world.   The third section of the course focuses on how the social inequalities of race, class, and gender are reproduced in various types of workplaces (low wage and professional).  The course ends with an analysis of workplace democracy and the role of the labor movement in promoting (and sometimes undermining) equality, job security, and rights for workers.

 

Required Texts:

 

Amy S. Wharton, Working in America, third edition.  McGraw Hill, 2006.

 

Carolina Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas: Race, Gender, and Shop-Floor Politics in Mexico and the United States. ILR Press, 2008.

 

Robert Reich, Supercapitalism: The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life. Knopf, 2007.

 

Christine Williams, Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality, University of California Press, 2006.

 

Course Requirements:

 

You must have completed at least 60 hours (junior standing) to take this class.  Students who do not meet this prerequisite will be dropped from the course.

 

Students are required to attend all class meetings and complete all reading assignments on time.  You are assigned to read approximately 100-150 pages per week.  Many of the readings for the class are difficult so you should not underestimate the amount of time necessary to finish your assignments.

 

Grades in the class will be based on three in-class examinations.  All exams consist of essay questions. (Please bring a blue book to exams.)  Evaluations are based on the mastery of the material and the quality of the writing.  The first two exams are worth 30 percent, and the third is worth 20 percent.  Make-up examinations will be given only with prior notice to those absent for university-approved reasons. 

 

The remaining 20 percent of the grade will be based on periodic written assignments.  These assignments will not be announced in advance:  You must be present in class the day of the assignment to receive it.  They will be due the following class period.

 

Academic misconduct of any sort will not be tolerated.  Any student found guilty of plagiarism or any other kind of cheating will receive an F in the course.

 

I am available to discuss appropriate academic accommodations that you may require as a student with a disability.  Before course accommodations will be made, you may be required to provide documentation to the Office of the Dean of Students, Services for Students with Disabilities.

 

Weekly Topics and Readings:

 

August 27:  Introduction to the course

 

I.  Theories of Work

 

September 1:  Marxist theory

            Read:  Marx, “Alienated Labor” (Wharton #4)

Hochschild, “The Managed Heart” (Wharton #8)

Bonacich & Appelbaum, “Behind the Label” (Wharton #22)

 

September 3:  Theories of Rationalization

            Read:  Weber, “Bureaucracy” (Wharton #5)

Taylor, “Fundamentals of Scientific Management” (Wharton #6)

Braverman, “The Division of Labor” (Wharton #7)

 

September 8:  Theories of Carework

            Read:  Crittendon, “How Mothers’ Work…” (Wharton #2)

                        Hondagneu-Sotelo, “Maid in L.A.” (Wharton #23)

England & Folbre, “Capitalism & the Erosion…” (Wharton #38)

Hays, “Flat Broke with Children” (Wharton #36)

 

II.              Transformation of Work

 

September 10:  Restructuring and Downsizing

            Read:  Powell, “The Capitalist Firm…” (Wharton #9)

                        Smith, “Structural Unemployment…” (Wharton #10)

 

September 15:  Computers and New Technology

Read:  Zuboff, “In the age…” (Wharton #11)

Head, “On the digital assembly line” (Wharton #12)

Buchanan, “Lives on the line” (Wharton #28)

Presser, “Toward a 24 hour economy” (Wharton #35)

 

September 17:  Worker Participation and Autonomy

            Read:  Smith, “Employee Involvement” (Wharton #14)

                        Leidner, “Over the Counter” (Wharton #27)

 

III.            Globalization

 

September 22-24:  Globalization, the State, and Immigration Policy

Read:  Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas, pp. 1-95.

 

September 29-October 1:  Global Manufacturing and the Labor Process

Read:  Bank-Muñoz, Transnational Tortillas, pp. 96-175.

 

October 6:  First examination

 

IV.            Workplace Inequality

 

October 8-13:  Income Inequality

            Read:  Firebaugh, “The New Geography” (Wharton #15)

                        Wilson, “Jobless Poverty” (Wharton #16)

                        Cotter et al., “Gender Inequality” (Wharton #17)

                       

October 15:  Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Workplace

            Read:  Henson & Rogers “My Marcia…” (Wharton #18)

                        Dellinger & Williams, “The Locker Room…” (Wharton #19)

                        Moss & Tilly, “Stories Employers Tell” (Wharton #20)

 

October 20-22:  Inequality in low wage work—social organization

            Read:  Williams, Inside Toyland, pp. 1-91

 

October 27-29:  Inequality in low wage work—interactions

            Read:  Williams, Inside Toyland, pp. 92-212

 

November 3-5:  Inequality in Professional and Managerial work

            Read:  Pierce, “Rambo Litigators” (Wharton #30)

                        Jackall, “Social Structure of Managerial Work (Wharton #31)

                        Collins, “Blacks on the Bubble” (Wharton #32)

                        Garey, “Motherhood on the Night Shift” (Wharton #41)

 

November 10:  Second examination

 

V.  Democratic Capitalism

 

November 12-17:  Supercapitalism and the Decline of Democracy

            Read:  Reich, Supercapitalism, pp. 1-130.

 

November 19-24:  The Politics of Supercapitalism

            Read:  Reich, Supercapitalism, pp. 131-225.

 

November 26:  Thanksgiving holiday (no class)

 

December 1:  Review

 

December 3:  Third examination

 

SOC 398T • Supv Teaching In Sociology

46810 • Fall 2009
Meets M 300pm-600pm BUR 214
show description

SUPERVISED TEACHING IN SOCIOLOGY (SOC 398T)
Fall 2009
Class location: Burdine 214
Class hours: Monday 3-6pm

Instructors

Professor Gloria González-López
Office:  Burdine 464
Office Hours: Wednesdays 11:00 - 1:00 and by appointment
Gloria@austin.utexas.edu

Professor Christine Williams
Office: Burdine 526
Office hours:  Thursdays 3:30-5:30 and by appointment
232-6321
cwilliams@austin.utexas.edu

Course Description

This seminar is a requirement for graduate students who are employed as teaching assistants and assistant instructors in the sociology department.  Its goal is to prepare students for the professional rewards and challenges of a career in academia.

The first portion of the course will address professionalization issues, dedicated to discussing the broader career issues that sociology professors face.  This seminar will discuss topics, issues, and concerns Ph.D. students face as part of their academic and professional training, including but not limited to their actual experiences in graduate school to publishing and getting a job as a professional sociologist.

The second portion of the course is focused on teaching preparation.  This part of the course will prepare the students to develop a teaching portfolio.  It will address teaching philosophy, designing a course syllabus, teaching strategies and techniques, student assessment, and student interactions.  

Readings

Required readings are listed on this syllabus.  They are available from the web, the Library, or Blackboard (BB).  Additional readings will be posted on Blackboard throughout the semester.

Students are required to purchase a DVD to record their practice teaching.


Course Requirements

This class is offered for credit/no credit only (i.e., no letter grades).  Students are required to attend all class meetings, to participate in class discussion, and to complete all readings, activities, and assignments on the dates they are due.  Written assignments must be 12-point font with 1 inch margins. Students who do not fulfill all of these requirements in a satisfactory manner will receive “no credit.”  

Courses like this traditionally involve a significant exchange of personal information in both class discussion and with instructors. You can be assured that we will keep all information in confidence. Please note that confidentiality and respect are expected from students.

Class Schedule and Reading Assignments

August 31:  Introduction to the course

Readings (BB):
“Teaching Assistant Policies”
 “What To Do When You Suspect a Student is in a Serious Mental Health Crisis”

Activity:
Teaching Assistants are required to meet with their course instructors and fill out the “Faculty-TA Contract” (BB)

September 7:  Labor Day (no class)

PART I:  PROFESSIONALIZATION (Professor Gloria González-López)

September 14: The First Year: Life in Graduate School

Topics:  Well-being, balance, negotiating graduate school; Mental health; Race/ethnicity, gender, and sexuality

Activity:
Students are required to go on line and take the UT Austin Sexual Harassment Module, and read Sexual Harassment related websites (i.e., Transcript of Sexual Harassment, UT policies on Sexual Harassment, Dean of Students, and VP for Institutional Relations and Legal Affairs). The Internet address on these issues: http://www.utexas.edu/ogs/ethics/harassment.html

Assignment (due Thursday, September 17):
Read “Professional Socialization in Sociology: Reflections of a Racial Pioneer” (BB), identify the three most relevant issues and concerns this essays provokes in you at this point in your professional and academic training, and write a 2-page essay to discuss these personal reflections. Incorporate the readings in the essay.

Speaker: UT Counseling & Mental Health Center representative

September 21:  Second Year: Courses & Mentoring

Topics:  Relationships with mentors & Professional Networking; Thesis Supervision: Identifying a topic, developing MA thesis / Dissertation topic; Attending academic presentations on campus.

Speaker: Sheldon Ekland-Olson

Activity:
Students are required to meet with a professor in our department and interview her/him (for about 15-20 minutes) to discuss the following: (1) three most rewarding lessons they learned as students from their own mentors; (2) based on their experience, three DOs and three DON’Ts in a mentoring relationship; and, (3) their words of wisdom for a new generation of sociologists as they develop a mentoring relationship.

Assignment (due Thursday, September 24):  
Read “Mentoring Graduate Students: Going Beyond the Formal Role Structure,” and write a 2-page essay describing an exemplary mentoring relationship.  Incorporate your interview and your own college experience in the essay.

Allan Schnaiberg, “Mentoring Graduate Students: Going Beyond the Formal Role Structure,” The American Sociologist, Summer 2005, 36(2): 28-42.

September 28: Third - Fourth Year: Professional Transitions

Topics:  Finish coursework; Expanding professional networks (within the department & the profession); Entering professional community; Submitting articles and responding to reviews (ethics of authorship); Presenting at professional conferences; Preparing for Comps

Speakers: Evelyn Porter & Kim Huyser

Activity:
Students are required to establish contact and meet with a Ph.D. candidate in our department in order to conduct an interview (for about 15-20 minutes) about (1) her/his experience before and after their comprehensive exams; (2) recommendations for a successful completion of this academic requirement.  

Assignment:
Come to our October 5 class prepared to discuss some of the challenges of the exam process and ideas for advance preparation.

October 5:  Fourth Year: Becoming a Ph.D. Candidate

Topics:  Research Question, Proposal preparation; Expanding professional networks; Working with committee members; Preparing and maintaining a CV; Ethics

Speakers: Hortencia Jimenez & Chuck Stokes

Activity:
Students are required to talk with fellow students, mentors, and faculty members about participation in professional meetings and association (e.g., what associations to participate in, when and how to present papers, developing professional networks, etc.).

Assignment:
Prepare a version of your CV. Recommended websites:
UT Austin - https://www.utexas.edu/research/eureka/resources/vitae/index.php
UC Riverside - http://careers.ucr.edu/Graduates/cv.htm

Recommended websites on Professional Ethics:
IRB (The Institutional Review Board regulations and provisions at UT Austin: http:www.utexas.edu/research/rsc/humanresearch/
The ASA Ethics Code: http://asanet.org/page.ww?section=Ethics&name=Ethics

October 12: Fifth Year: Completing Your Dissertation

Topics:  Successful Writing; Funding, Dissertation Fellowships

Speakers: Corinne Reczek & Megan Reid

Due today: Come to class with (1) 2 copies of your CV; and, (2) your notes on conversations on professional meetings and associations.

Assignment:
Contact professional sociologists who are at different kinds of institutions (i.e., research universities, liberal arts colleges, community colleges, etc.) and gather information about the range of possible job opportunities for professional sociologists.


Activity (paper due on Thursday October 15):
Write a 3-page essay reflecting on (1) your true passion; (2) what you see yourself doing as a professional sociologist; and, (3) what challenges and opportunities you see yourself facing in this department and our profession as part of this process. In this essay, include information from conversations with sociologists at different kinds of professional institutions.

October 19:  Graduation and Beyond

Topics:  Academic job searching: ASA job bank; Interviewing for a job; Life as a junior professor; tenure; Professional opportunities beyond academia; Publishing Book vs. Articles;  Reviewing articles

Speakers: Cati Connell & Jeremy Uecker

Due today:
Read “The Identity Career of the Graduate Student: Professional Socialization to Academic Sociology,” and prepare and bring (1) your notes exploring the most relevant issues and concerns this article provokes in you; and, (2) a copy of the 3-page paper you submitted on October 15. Please read “Important readings” and incorporate your reflections when / if appropriate.

Patricia A. Adler & Peter Adler, 2005, “The Identity Career of the Graduate Student: Professional Socialization to Academic Sociology,” The American Sociologist, 36(2): 11-27.

ASA Research Brief: The Best Time to Have a Baby: Institutional Resources and Family Strategies Among Early Career Sociologists (BB)

PART II:  ORGANIZED TEACHING (Professor Christine Williams)

October 26:  Your teaching philosophy

Readings:
bell hooks, “Confronting Class in the Classroom.” Chapter 12 of Teaching to Transgress. New York: Routledge, 1994. (BB)
Paolo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, chapter 2. (Orig. pub. 1970.) (BB)
http://www.stanfordalumni.org/news/magazine/2003/janfeb/features/teachers.html
http://www.vcu.edu/cte/resources/nfrg/09_03_what_best_college.htm
http://www.vcu.edu/cte/resources/nfrg/09_05_characteristics_effective.htm
http://www.vcu.edu/cte/resources/nfrg/09_02_guide_quick_starters.htm
Teaching at Stanford, pp. 3-7 (http://ctl.stanford.edu/handbook.pdf)

Activity:
Students are required to meet with their mentors and interview them (for about 10-15 minutes) about their teaching philosophy.  

Assignment (due Thursday, October 29):  
Write a 2-page essay describing an exemplary college course and professor.  Incorporate the readings and your interview in the essay.

November 2:  Designing a course

Readings:
http://www.csbsju.edu/les/pastevents/syllabi.htm
Teaching at Stanford, pp. 7-20 (http://ctl.stanford.edu/handbook.pdf)

Activity:
Collect sample syllabi on your course topic from the department, your own college experience, the websites of other universities, and the home pages of scholars whose work you admire.

Assignment (due Thursday, November 5):  
Submit an original syllabus for an undergraduate course you would like to teach.

Guest speaker:   Professor Michael Young, associate chair.

November 9:   Teaching Strategies

Readings:
http://www.idea.ksu.edu/resources/Papers.html #24
http://www.idea.ksu.edu/resources/Papers.html #14
http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/earlycareer/teaching/LargeClasses.html
Teaching at Stanford, pp. 21-38 (http://ctl.stanford.edu/handbook.pdf)

Activity:
Attend an undergraduate course, with the instructor’s permission.  Do not pick the course you are currently TA-ing.

Assignment (due Thursday, November 12):
Turn in a written evaluation of the class you observed using the teaching evaluation guide, available on BB.




November 16:   Instructional Technique

Activity:  
Students will be assigned to one of three groups.  Each group will sign up for a one-hour session with the DIIA in which each group member will deliver a ten-minute lecture on a sociological topic from their model course.  Presentations will be recorded in front of your group and the professor, and evaluated using a peer review form.  Students will meet one-on-one with Mark Decker from DIIA for a debriefing on their teaching techniques.

Assignment (due Thursday, November 19):
Write a 2 page essay that details the insights you gained from viewing and discussing the recording of your teaching and that of your peers.

Guest presentation by Mario Guerra, DIIA, “Power-Point in the Classroom.”

November 23:    Student Assessment

Readings:
http://www.idea.ksu.edu/resources/Papers.html, #16, #17
Teaching at Stanford, pp. 40-48 (http://ctl.stanford.edu/handbook.pdf)

Activity:
Collect examinations from others who teach your model course.  Identify good and bad questions from the exams you collected.  

Assignment (due Thursday, November 26):  
Submit an examination for your model course.  This can be composed of either multiple choice questions or essay questions (or both).  Include an answer key.

November 30:    Interactions with Students

Readings:
A. Miller & B. Lucal, “The Pedagogy of (in)visibility: Two accounts of teaching about sex, gender, and sexuality” Teaching Sociology 37:3 (July 2009): 257-68.
C. Albers, “Teaching: From Disappointment to Ecstasy” Teaching Sociology 37:3 (July 2009): 269-82.
S. Kleinman & M. Copp, “Denying Social Harm: Students’ Resistance to Lessons about Inequality” Teaching Sociology 37:3 (July 2009): 283-93.
D. Rodriguez, “The Usual Suspect: Negotiating White Student Resistance and Teacher Authority in a Predominantly White Classroom” Cultural Studies <=> Critical Methodologies 9 (2009): 483-508.
Teaching at Stanford, pp. 49-58 (http://ctl.stanford.edu/handbook.pdf)

SOC 395G • Readings In Gender & Sexuality

45910 • Spring 2009
Meets TH 1200-300pm BUR 480
(also listed as WGS 393 )
show description

Course Description: 

This seminar is designed to help students understand of the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. In this seminar we examine both theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Topics to be discussed include changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. Because many articles we will read involve statistical analyses, students are expected to be able to read and understand quantitative sociological research at the level of SOC385L or the equivalent. While a large proportion of the readings are based on research in the United States, international comparisons of women’s economic roles also constitute an important part of this seminar. In particular, we address how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men’s and women’s economic opportunities and thus the degree of gender inequality in the society.    Students are expected to attend class regularly and read the assigned readings prior to the class period during which we will discuss the material. Active participation in class discussions is also required. 

Texts:

The required texts for this course includes books and articles from peer-reviewed sociological journals. The list below shows some of the books required for this course:  

Goldin, Claudia. 1990. Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women. Oxford University Press.

Charles, Maria. and David B. Grusky. 2004. Occupational Ghetto: The Worldwide Segregation of Men and Women. Stanford University Press.

Ogasawara, Yuko. 1998. Office Ladies and Salaried Men: Power, Gender, and Work in Japanese Companies. University of California. 

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