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Christine L. Williams, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Robert Crosnoe

Ph.D., Stanford

Professor of Sociology; Elsie and Stanley E. (Skinny) Adams, Sr. Centennial Professor in Liberal Arts
Robert Crosnoe

Contact

Biography

Rob Crosnoe received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Stanford University and then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Carolina Population Center and the Center for Developmental Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  His main research area is the life course and human development; specifically, the connections among children’s and adolescents’ health, psychosocial development, and educational trajectories and how these connections contribute to population-level inequalities (e.g., race, social class, immigration).

Dr. Crosnoe's books include:

Gordon, Rachel, Robert Crosnoe, and Xue Wang. 2013. Physical Attractiveness and the Accumulation of Social and Human Capital in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Assets and Distractions. Ann Arbor, MI: Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2011. Fitting In, Standing Out: Navigating the Social Challenges of High School to Get an Education. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2006. Mexican Roots, American Schools: Helping Mexican Immigrant Children Succeed. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.

Recent articles include:

Crosnoe, Robert, Kate Chambers Pickett, Chelsea Smith, and Shannon Cavanagh. 2014. “Changes in Young Children’s Family Structures and Child Care Arrangements.” Demography 51: 459–483.

Crosnoe, Robert, Jennifer Augustine, and Aletha C. Huston. 2012. “Children’s Early Child Care and
Mother’s Later Involvement with Schools.” Child Development 83: 758–772.

Crosnoe, Robert and Carey E. Cooper. 2010. “Economically Disadvantaged Children’s Transitions into Elementary School: Linking Family Processes, School Contexts, and Educational Policy.” American Educational Research Journal 47: 258-291.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2009. “Low-Income Students and the Socioeconomic Composition of Public High Schools.” American Sociological Review 74: 709-730.

Crosnoe, Robert, Kenneth Frank, and Ann Strassman Mueller. 2008. “Gender, Body Size, and Social Relations in American High Schools.” Social Forces 86: 1189-1216.

Crosnoe, Robert and Aletha C. Huston. 2007. “Socioeconomic Status, Schooling, and the Developmental Trajectories of Adolescents.” Developmental Psychology 43: 1097-1110.

Recent reviews and policy briefs include:

Crosnoe, Robert and Aprile Benner. (in press). “Children at School.” In Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science, Vol. 4: Ecological Settings and Processes, edited by Marc Bornstein & Tama Leventhal (series editor: Richard M. Lerner). New York: Wiley.

Robert Crosnoe and Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson. 2011. “Research on Adolescence in the 21st Century.” Annual Review of Sociology 37: 439-460.

Crosnoe, Robert and Ruth Lopez-Turley. 2011. “The K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth.” Future of Children 21: 129-152.

Crosnoe, Robert and Shannon E. Cavanagh. 2010. “Families with Children and Adolescents: A Review, Critique, and Future Agenda.” Journal of Marriage and Family 72: 1-18.

Crosnoe, Robert. 2010. “Two Generation Strategies and Involving Immigrant Parents in Children’s Education.” Policy Brief for Urban Institute. http://www.urban.org/publications/412204.html

This research has been supported by several current or past grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development as well as from the William T. Grant Scholars Program and the Foundation for Child Development Changing Faces of American Children Scholars Program. Professor Crosnoe is also a member of several research groups, including the NICHD Early Child Care Research Network, the Collaborative on the Analysis of Pathways from Childhood to Adulthood, and the Institute of Medicine Study Group on Young Adult Health and Safety. In recent years, he has won early career awards from the Society for Research in Child Development, the Society for Research on Human Development, and the Children and Youth Section of the American Sociological Association.

Professor Crosnoe teaches Introduction to Sociology, Sociology of the Family, and Difficult Dialogues: Race and Social Policy in the U.S. on the undergraduate level. He is also faculty member in the Children and Society Bridging Disciplines Program for undergraduates at UT.

NIH Biosketch

NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

Collaborative on the Analysis of Pathways from Childhood to Adulthood

Interests

Human Development, Education, Family, Health, Immigration

SOC 389K • Training Smnr In Demography

46390 • Fall 2014
Meets F 1000am-1200pm CLA 3.106
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Description 

The focus of this training seminar is professional socialization—how to get through graduate school and to construct a rewarding career path in population research.  We will spend the semester participating in activities and discussions aimed at providing concrete, practical advice and assistance for getting ahead.  Evaluation (credit/no credit) will be based on attendance and participation (note: attendance at the PRC brown bag series is required of all students).

Readings

None

Grading

100% of the grade is based on attendance and participation

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45915-46050 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm WCH 1.120
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Description

This course offers an introduction to the theories, methodologies, vocabulary, and themes of the discipline of sociology.  During the semester, we will explore the linkage between individuals and the larger cultures, contexts, and groups in which they live their lives in order to better understand the structure and function of social interaction, human behavior, and the institutional framework of society.  The over-arching purpose of the course is to instill in you the “sociological imagination”, which can then be used to decipher current social issues and patterns of everyday life.  The format of this course is designed to offer students the benefits of both a large lecture class and a small discussion seminar.  On Mondays and Wednesdays, the class will be led by Dr. Crosnoe in a traditional lecture format.  For the third hour, the class will be broken up into smaller units for discussion sections on either Thursday or Friday.  This section, led by one of the teaching assistant, will offer a forum for students to discuss class materials from earlier in the week, explore some new and old topics in greater depth, and engage in exercises intended to provide real world applications of sociological concepts.

Required Texts

Giddens, Anthony, Mitchell Duneier, Richard Appelbaum, and Deborah Carr. 2011. Introduction to Sociology, Eighth Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Reader:

Massey, Garth (Ed.). 2011. Readings for Sociology, Seventh Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Grading Policy

Each student is expected to attend all three weekly class meetings, including the Friday discussion section.  Students should complete all readings prior to the class period for which they are assigned and also be ready to contribute to class discussion.

There will be THREE examinations during the semester (75% of final grade).  The exams will draw from both readings and class lectures.  Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand.  All make-up examinations are 100% essay.

Students must also complete THREE short papers during the semester (25% of total grade).  These two-page papers are intended to encourage you to think about current issues and events in a sociological way.  Topics will be assigned two weeks before the due date.  No late assignments will be accepted.

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45190-45215 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description:

This course offers an introduction to the theories, methodologies, vocabulary, and themes of the discipline of sociology.  During the semester, we will explore the linkage between individuals and the larger cultures, contexts, and groups in which they live their lives in order to better understand the structure and function of social interaction, human behavior, and the institutional framework of society.  The over-arching purpose of the course is to instill in you the “sociological imagination”, which can then be used to decipher current social issues and patterns of everyday life.The format of this course is designed to offer students the benefits of both a large lecture class and a small discussion seminar.  On Mondays and Wednesdays, the class will be led by Dr. Crosnoe in a traditional lecture format.  For the third hour, the class will be broken up into smaller units for discussion sections on either Thursday or Friday.  This section, led by one of the teaching assistant, will offer a forum for students to discuss class materials from earlier in the week, explore some new and old topics in greater depth, and engage in exercises intended to provide real world applications of sociological concepts.

Course Readings:

Giddens, Anthony, Mitchell Duneier, Richard Applebaum, and Deborah Carr. 2009. Introduction to Sociology, Seventh Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Massey, Garth (Ed.). 2008. Readings for Sociology, Sixth Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Course Requirements:

Each student is expected to attend all three weekly class meetings, including the Friday discussion section.  Students should complete all readings prior to the class period for which they are assigned and also be ready to contribute to class discussion.There will be THREE examinations during the semester (75% of final grade).  The exams will draw from both readings and class lectures.  Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand.  All make-up examinations are 100% essay.Students must also complete THREE short papers during the semester (25% of total grade).  These two-page papers are intended to encourage you to think about current issues and events in a sociological way.  Topics will be assigned two weeks before the due date.  No late assignments will be accepted.

SOC 396L • Social Context Of Education

46360 • Spring 2011
Meets M 1200pm-300pm BUR 231
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The educational system encompasses both formal and informal processes.  The formal, such as instruction and learning, generally receive most of the attention in empirical research.  The informal (e.g., socialization, the organization of social relations), however, may be just as important to students’ short- and long-term trajectories.  In other words, the school is a social context in which young people develop as well as an educational institution in which they are taught and exposed to curricula.  The purpose of this graduate seminar is to study this less often explored side of schooling—the school as a social context—by delving into the informal processes of education.  After a brief introduction, this seminar will cover three main areas: 1) the school as a site of social relations, 2) social psychological influences on educational trajectories, and 2) the social psychological consequences of educational experiences.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45255-45280 • Fall 2010
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description
This course offers an introduction to the theories, methodologies, vocabulary, and themes of the discipline of sociology.  During the semester, we will explore the linkage between individuals and the larger cultures, contexts, and groups in which they live their lives in order to better understand the structure and function of social interaction, human behavior, and the institutional framework of society.  The over-arching purpose of the course is to instill in you the “sociological imagination”, which can then be used to decipher current social issues and patterns of everyday life.

The format of this course is designed to offer students the benefits of both a large lecture class and a small discussion seminar.  On Mondays and Wednesdays, the class will be led by Dr. Crosnoe in a traditional lecture format.  For the third hour, the class will be broken up into smaller units for discussion sections on either Thursday or Friday.  This section, led by one of the teaching assistant, will offer a forum for students to discuss class materials from earlier in the week, explore some new and old topics in greater depth, and engage in exercises intended to provide real world applications of sociological concepts.

Course Readings
Giddens, Anthony, Mitchell Duneier, Richard Applebaum, and Deborah Carr. 2009. Introduction to Sociology, Seventh Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Massey, Garth (Ed.). 2008. Readings for Sociology, Sixth Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Course Requirements
Each student is expected to attend all three weekly class meetings, including the Friday discussion section.  Students should complete all readings prior to the class period for which they are assigned and also be ready to contribute to class discussion.

There will be THREE examinations during the semester (75% of final grade).  The exams will draw from both readings and class lectures.  Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand.  All make-up examinations are 100% essay.

Students must also complete THREE short papers during the semester (25% of total grade).  These two-page papers are intended to encourage you to think about current issues and events in a sociological way.  Topics will be assigned two weeks before the due date.  No late assignments will be accepted.

UGS 303 • Difficult Dialog: Race/Policy

63950 • Spring 2010
Meets M 200pm-500pm GAR 1.134
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See attached syllabus in pdf form.

SOC 389K • Training Smnr In Demography

46705 • Fall 2009
Meets F 1000-100pm BUR 214
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University of Texas at Austin                                                                                          Sociology 389K (46705)

Department of Sociology                                                                                                                   Fall, 2009

                                                                                                                                             F: 10:00 - 12:00

                                                                                                                                                        BUR 214

 

Training Seminar in Demography

 

 

Professor:            Dr. Robert Crosnoe

Office:            Burdine Hall 576

Hours:            By Appointment

Phone:            232-6340

Email:             crosnoe@austin.utexas.edu

 

 

The focus of this training seminar is professional socialization—how to get through graduate school and to construct a rewarding career path in population research.  We will spend the semester participating in activities and discussions aimed at providing concrete, practical advice and assistance for getting ahead.  Evaluation (credit/no credit) will be based on attendance and participation (note: attendance at the PRC brown bag series is required of all students).

 

 

Week 1 (August 28)

Introduction to the Course

Week 8 (October 16)

Proposing and Writing a Dissertation

Week 2 (September 4)

Developing a Research Agenda

Week 9 (October 23)

TBD

Week 3 (September11)

Working with Faculty

Week 10 (October 30)

The Academic Job Market

Week 4 (September18)

Preparing for Comprehensive Exams

Week 11 (November 6)

Postdoctoral Fellowships and Non-Academic Jobs

Week 5 (September25)

Writing Journal Articles

Week 12 (November 13)

Preparing a CV

Week 6 (October 2)

Publishing

Week 13 (November 20)

Balancing Work and Life

Week 7 (October 9)

External Funding

Week 14 (December 4)

Course Wrap-Up

 

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