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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Kelly Fulton

Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin

Lecturer

Contact

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45865-45890 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 830am-930am JGB 2.324
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in institutions such as education or our families, and in global events.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, and deviance. The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 45% (15% each)

Sociological exercises - several short written assignments 20%

Sociological perspective (group project) – 20%

Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

 Texts

Conley, Dalton, You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist,

Third Edition, 2013.  New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Sixth Edition, 2013.

Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a

Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006. Penguin Books.

 

 

 

SOC 321L • Sociology Of Education

46187 • Fall 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am CLA 1.302D
(also listed as AFR 321L, WGS 345 )
show description

Course Description

This course examines education in the United States from a sociological perspective. We will use various sociological concepts, methods and theories to explore the institution of education, going beyond our own individual experiences with education. Specific topics include public education; standardized testing; charter schools; and stratification within and between schools with a focus on race, class and gender.

This course carries the Writing Flag. Writing Flag courses are designed to give students experience with writing in an academic discipline. In this class, you can expect to write regularly during the semester, complete substantial writing projects, and receive feedback to help you improve your writing. You will also have the opportunity to revise one or more assignments, and you will be asked to read and discuss your peers’ work.

Required Texts

* Arum, Richard and Irenee R. Beattie, The Structure of Schooling: Readings in the Sociology of Education, Second Edition, Sage Publications, 2011.


* Lareau, Annette, Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, 2nd Edition, University of California Press, 2011.

* Ravitch, Diane, Reign of Error, Knopf, 2013.

* A collection of readings available on the Canvas course site.

 Evaluation

There will be in-class tests, short papers, a group project, and a literature review for this writing flag course.  Class participation is a component of the final grade.

SOC 321L • Sociology Of Education

46415 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 930am-1100am PAR 201
(also listed as AFR 321L, WGS 345 )
show description

This course examines education in the United States from a sociological perspective. We will use various sociological concepts, methods and theories to explore the institution of education, going beyond our own individual experiences with education. Specific topics include public education; standardized testing; charter schools; and stratification within and between schools with a focus on race, class and gender.

SOC 323 • The Family

46430 • Spring 2014
Meets TTH 1100am-1230pm BUR 112
show description

Description

This course analyzes the family as a social institution, using the sociological perspective. 

Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families.  It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data.  Shifting definitions of the family are the context for a brief history of the family.  Throughout the course we will explore family change. Specific topics will include dating, “hooking up” and marriage; parents and children; cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies; and how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies.

 Grading Policy

Students will be evaluated via short papers, in-class short answer and essay examinations, a group project, and class participation. 

 Texts: (subject to change)

Bogle, Kathleen.  2008.  Hooking Up: Sex, Dating and Relationships on Campus.  NYU Press.       

Coontz, Stephanie.  2006.  Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.                

Ferguson, Susan J. (ed.).  2010.  Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families, Fourth Edition.  Boston: McGraw-Hill. 

Lareau, Annette.   2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later.  Berkeley: University of California Press.

Stone, Pamela.  2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45875-46040 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 830am-930am JGB 2.324
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender. During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 20% each

Sociological journal - several short written assignments 25%

Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

Texts

Blair-Loy, Mary, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives, Harvard University Press, 2003

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005

SOC 323 • The Family

46185 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JGB 2.218
show description

Description

This course analyzes the family as a social institution, using the sociological perspective. 

Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families.  It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data.  Shifting definitions of the family are the context for a brief history of the family.  Throughout the course we will explore family change. Specific topics will include dating, “hooking up” and marriage; parents and children; cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies; and how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies.

 Grading Policy

Students will be evaluated via short papers, in-class short answer and essay examinations, a group project, and class participation. 

 Texts: (subject to change)

Bogle, Kathleen.  2008.  Hooking Up: Sex, Dating and Relationships on Campus.  NYU Press.       

Coontz, Stephanie.  2006.  Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.                

Ferguson, Susan J. (ed.).  2010.  Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families, Fourth Edition.  Boston: McGraw-Hill. 

Lareau, Annette.   2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later.  Berkeley: University of California Press.

Stone, Pamela.  2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45485-45510 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 830am-930am JGB 2.324
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender. During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 20% each

Sociological journal - several short written assignments 25%

Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

Texts

Blair-Loy, Mary, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives, Harvard University Press, 2003

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005

SOC 321L • Sociology Of Education

45776 • Spring 2013
Meets TTH 930am-1100am JGB 2.218
(also listed as AFR 321L, WGS 345 )
show description

Course Description

This course examines education in the United States from a sociological perspective. We will use various sociological concepts, methods and theories to explore the institution of education, going beyond our own individual experiences with education. Specific topics include public education; standardized testing; charter schools; and stratification within and between schools with a focus on race, class and gender.

Required Texts

* Arum, Richard and Irenee R. Beattie, The Structure of Schooling: Readings in the Sociology of Education, Second Edition, Sage Publications, 2011.


* A collection of readings available on the BlackBoard course site.

Evaluation

There will be in-class tests, short papers, a group project, and video analyses for this course.

 

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45320-45335 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 830am-930am JGB 2.324
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender. During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 20% each

Sociological journal - several short written assignments 25%

Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

Texts

Blair-Loy, Mary, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives, Harvard University Press, 2003

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45370-45395 • Fall 2012
Meets MW 1100am-1200pm WCH 1.120
show description

Course Description:

This course offers an introduction to the theories, methodologies, vocabulary, and themes of the discipline of sociology.  During the semester, we will explore the linkage between individuals and the larger cultures, contexts, and groups in which they live their lives in order to better understand the structure and function of social interaction, human behavior, and the institutional framework of society.  The over-arching purpose of the course is to instill in you the “sociological imagination”, which can then be used to decipher current social issues and patterns of everyday life.The format of this course is designed to offer students the benefits of both a large lecture class and a small discussion seminar.  On Mondays and Wednesdays, the class will be led by Dr. Crosnoe in a traditional lecture format.  For the third hour, the class will be broken up into smaller units for discussion sections on either Thursday or Friday.  This section, led by one of the teaching assistant, will offer a forum for students to discuss class materials from earlier in the week, explore some new and old topics in greater depth, and engage in exercises intended to provide real world applications of sociological concepts.

Course Readings:

Giddens, Anthony, Mitchell Duneier, Richard Applebaum, and Deborah Carr. 2009. Introduction to Sociology, Seventh Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Massey, Garth (Ed.). 2008. Readings for Sociology, Sixth Edition. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

Course Requirements:

Each student is expected to attend all three weekly class meetings, including the Friday discussion section.  Students should complete all readings prior to the class period for which they are assigned and also be ready to contribute to class discussion.There will be THREE examinations during the semester (75% of final grade).  The exams will draw from both readings and class lectures.  Make-up examinations will not be administered except in extreme circumstances and only if I am notified beforehand.  All make-up examinations are 100% essay.Students must also complete THREE short papers during the semester (25% of total grade).  These two-page papers are intended to encourage you to think about current issues and events in a sociological way.  Topics will be assigned two weeks before the due date.  No late assignments will be accepted.

SOC 323 • The Family

45560 • Fall 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Description:

In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives.

Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families. It is

important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as

well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data. Shifting definitions of the

family provide a starting point for an exploration of the history of “the family”. Throughout the course

we will explore if and how the family is declining and changing using conservative, liberal, centrist and

feminist perspectives. Specific topics will include parental and child roles; gender, race and social class as

stratification systems which influence families; how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes

other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state

and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies as three important changes in the US

family over the last several decades.

The primary objectives for this course are:

• To use a sociological perspective in studying families, with an emphasis on diversity within and

between families.

• To think about families in societal context.

• To sharpen critical thinking skills by participating in class discussions and other group activities and completing writing assignments that require analysis and revision.

Questions we will address include:

• What is the definition of family? (Why is this a complicated question?)

• What social-structural forces shape family processes?

• How is the family a gendered institution?

• How does government attempt to shape families? Support families?

Texts:

! Ferguson, Susan J. (ed.). 2010. Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families, Fourth Edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

! Bogle, Kathleen. 2008. Hooking Up: Sex, Dating and Relationships on Campus. NYU Press.

! Coontz, Stephanie. 2006. Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.

! Lareau, Annette. 2011. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life, Second Edition with an Update a Decade Later. Berkeley: University of California Press.

! Stone, Pamela. 2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.

(All books available for purchase at the Co-op on Guadalupe.)

! Additional readings may be posted to our BlackBoard course site.

Grading and Requirements:

Literature Review (30% total)

Select a topic of interest to you. The literature review will form the basis for the group presentation.

There will be peer review (worth 5%) as well as instructor comments on this assignment. You will

submit a memo detailing your revisions with the final draft. More details on a handout.

Group Presentation and Class Discussion (20%)

Students will be put into groups based on topics selected for the literature review. Each group will have responsibility for leading a class session on a specific topic relating to the sociology of education.

This will include: presenting materials from outside the course readings drawing connections with relevant course readings posing discussion questions The presentation should tie together thematically, and use guiding questions. This is up to the group to decide in consultation with the instructor. Each group member is responsible for contributing academic articles for integration into the final presentation. Groups should use some sort of visual aid and handout in their presentation.

Thematic synthesis (10%)

Each student will find a news article and write a two-page essay, using themes and material encountered during the course. Be prepared to discuss during class.

Other indicators of participation (40%)

Reading Journal: (22.5%) Total of six entries. 6 one-page single-spaced entries related to required course reading. More details on a handout.

Discussion leading (5%): Each student will lead discussion once during the semester.

Other assessment: (12.5%) Excessive absences will negatively affect your grade. Merely

showing up to class, however, is not sufficient participation. Ways that I assess participation

include contributions during class discussions and the level of preparedness for presentations.

Grades: The final grades will be computed as follows:

Literature Review 120 points 30%

Literature review 100 points

Peer review 20 points

Group Presentation 80 points 20%

Thematic Synthesis 40 points 10%

Participation 160 points 40%

Reading Journal 90 points

Discussion Leading 20 points

Other assessment 50 points

TOTAL 400 points 100%

A 94-100% 400 – 376 C+ 77-79% 319 – 308

A- 90-93% 375 – 360 C 74-76% 307 – 296

B+ 87-89% 359 – 348 C- 70-73% 295 – 280

B 84-86% 347 – 336 D 60-69% 279 – 240

B- 80-83% 335 – 320 F 59% or less 239 - 0

CR 70% or more 280 +

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45270-45295 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 830am-930am JGB 2.324
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender. During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 20% each

Sociological journal - several short written assignments 25%

Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

Texts

Blair-Loy, Mary, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives, Harvard University Press, 2003

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45355-45375 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm GAR 0.102
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender. During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 20% each

Sociological journal - several short written assignments 25%

Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

Texts

Blair-Loy, Mary, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives, Harvard University Press, 2003

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008

Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005

SOC 323 • The Family

45570 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Description:In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives.Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families. It isimportant, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family aswell as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data. Shifting definitions of thefamily provide a starting point for an exploration of the history of “the family”. Throughout the coursewe will explore if and how the family is declining and changing using conservative, liberal, centrist andfeminist perspectives. Specific topics will include parental and child roles; gender, race and social class asstratification systems which influence families; how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapesother social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as stateand social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies as three important changes in the USfamily over the last several decades.The primary objectives for this course are:• To use a sociological perspective in studying families, with an emphasis on diversity within andbetween families.• To think about families in societal context.• To sharpen critical thinking skills by participating in class discussions and other group activitiesand completing writing assignments that require analysis and revision.Questions we will address include:• What is the definition of family? (Why is this a complicated question?)• What social-structural forces shape family processes?• How is the family a gendered institution?• How does government attempt to shape families? Support families?

Required Texts and MaterialsFerguson, Susan J. (ed.). 2010. Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families, Fourth Edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill.Bogle, Kathleen. 2008. Hooking Up: Sex, Dating and Relationships on Campus. NYU Press.Coontz, Stephanie. 2006. Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. New York: Penguin.Lareau, Annette. 2003. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life.Berkeley: University of California Press.Stone, Pamela. 2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.(All books available for purchase at the Co-op on Guadalupe.) Additional readings may be posted to our BlackBoard course site.Grading and Requirements:

Literature Review 120 points 30% (Literature review 100 points, Peer review 20 points)

Group Presentation 80 points 20%

Thematic Synthesis 40 points 10%

Participation 160 points 40% (Reading Journal 100 points, Discussion Leading 20 points, Other assessment 40 points)

TOTAL 400 points 100%

A 94-100% 400 – 376

A- 90-93% 375 – 360

B+ 87-89% 359 – 348

B 84-86% 347 – 336

B- 80 - 83% 335-320

C+ 77-79% 319 – 308

C 74-76% 307 – 296

C- 70-73% 295 – 280

D 60-69% 279 – 240

 

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45100-45125 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 830am-930am JGB 2.324
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender. During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 20% each
Sociological journal - several short written assignments 25%
Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

Texts

Blair-Loy, Mary, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives, Harvard University Press, 2003
McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008 
McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008
Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005

SOC 323 • The Family

45390 • Fall 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.216
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Family history and origins; comparative family systems; the American family; social antecedents of family structure and process; family formation and dissolution; family and society. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

45835-45850 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 830am-930am PAI 2.48
show description

Course Description

How are our individual choices shaped by society? How do our choices help shape society? These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society. The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us - in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world. In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities. Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender. During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

Grading Policy

Three in-class multiple choice, short answer and essay tests 20% each
Sociological journal - several short written assignments 25%
Class participation, including individual and group activities during lecture and discussion sections 15%

Texts

Blair-Loy, Mary, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives, Harvard University Press, 2003
McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008 
McIntyre, Lisa J., The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2008
Nathan, Rebekah, My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005

SOC 323 • The Family

46120 • Spring 2011
Meets TTH 930am-1100am BUR 231
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives. Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families. It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data. Shifting definitions of the family are the context for a brief history of the family. Throughout the course we will explore if and how the family is declining and changing using conservative, liberal, centrist and feminist perspectives. Specific topics will include parental and child roles; gender and social class as stratification systems which influence families; how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and work as well as state and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies as three important changes in the US family over the last several decades.

SOC 323 • The Family

45540 • Fall 2010
Meets TTH 930am-1100am MEZ 1.216
(also listed as WGS 345 )
show description

Meets with WGS 345.2/47160

 

Carries a Writing Flag

 

Description


In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives. Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families. It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data. Shifting definitions of the family are the context for a brief history of the family. Throughout the course we will explore if and how the family is declining and changing using conservative, liberal, centrist and feminist perspectives. Specific topics will include parental and child roles; gender and social class as stratification systems which influence families; how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and work as well as state and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies as three important changes in the US family over the last several decades.

SOC 302 • Intro To The Study Of Society

46130-46145 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 830-930 BUR 216
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Overview

How are our individual choices shaped by society?  How do our choices help shape society?  These are two primary questions we will address in Introduction to the Study of Society.  The sociological imagination will be one of our primary tools as we explore society and our place within it. Since we are studying society and therefore ourselves, opportunities to use our sociological imaginations are all around us – in our everyday interactions, in global events, even in the music we hear.

 

The first part of the course explores some of the ways sociologists view society, and also how we study the social world.  In addition, we will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure of organizations.

 

The second part of the course focuses on inequalities.  Stratification takes many forms; we will explore social class, race and ethnicities, and gender.  During this segment we will pay particular attention to inequalities within the institutions of families and education.

 

The primary objectives for this course are:

  • To become familiar with major concepts, theories and methodologies of sociology.

       In other words, you will know how to answer the question “What is sociology?”

  • To learn several different theories of understanding society and be able to apply them to your life and to groups within our society.
  • To continue to develop and hone critical thinking skills by participating in class discussions and other group activities and completing writing assignments that require analysis.
  • To develop your sociological imagination.

 

Required Texts and Materials

 

? Conley, Dalton. 2001.  Honky. Vintage Press.

                         Noted as Honky on the course schedule.  

 

? Conley, Dalton. 2008.  You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.

                         Noted as Y on the course schedule with Chapter Numbers.  For example, Y Ch. 2

 

  ? McIntyre, Lisa J. 2008.  The Practical Skeptic: Readings in Sociology, Fourth Edition. 

  Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Noted as PS on the course schedule with reading #.  For example, PS #23.

 

? Nathan, Rebekah.  2006. My Freshman Year:  What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student.  Penguin Books.

                        Noted as Nathan on the course schedule. 

 

? Additional readings posted on BlackBoard.  

 

Books available at the Co-op on Guadalupe.

Please bring required texts to class.

 

Reading Assignments

Readings are assigned for most class periods. I expect you to read the assigned material prior to class.  Many of the articles in the book of readings are short, which will allow us to compare and contrast multiple ideas and examples.  While you are reading, think about how the articles complement each other.  How do they relate to the information in the text book?  What is the author’s main argument?  What is most interesting to you?  Is anything confusing? Ideally, you will come to class prepared to participate, both in small and large groups.

 

Blackboard

Various course materials and grades will be posted on this site.  Check it frequently to stay informed about your progress.

 

Informational postings can be found on Blackboard at http://courses.utexas.edu/ 

Only students who have listed an email address at registration will have access to this site. 

To register an email address or to change your email address, go to  www.utexas.edu/cc/blackboard/tutorials/index.html.  See "For Students," "Changing Your Email Address."  Please check your access early in the semester and contact ITS at 475-9400 if you have problems.

 

Attendance, Participation and Classroom Etiquette:

Regular class attendance is to your advantage since class discussion and lectures will contain information for which you will be responsible as assessed by tests, but which will not be in the required texts.  Although discussion sections will be the primary forum for talking about the class material, there will also be opportunities during lecture for some small group discussion.

 

I will do my best to make class time informative and engaging, but as a wise person once said, “It takes two to tango.”  Our joint venture will be mutually beneficial and enjoyable with everyone as an active participant. An active participant is someone who has read and thought about the reading, and who comes to class ready to participate and ask questions. 

 

Introduction to Sociology encompasses a wide variety of topics; Conley in You May Ask Yourself and McIntyre in the Practical Skeptic encourage us to question our society, and our thoughts about the social world.  It is possible, in this process, that certain topics and discussions may spark strong feelings and disagreements. It is important that each of us maintains respect for opinions other than our own and practices good listening skills.

 

Please arrive on time to class and turn off pagers, beepers and cell phones.  Unless you are bringing a relevant newspaper article to share (which I encourage), I do not want to see newspapers during class. 

 

I welcome the use of computers in the classroom if they are used as learning aids or for note-taking.  It can be handy to have someone look up a particular fact or figure during class.  The difference between typing notes and the constant back and forth of IM, or solitaire, is obvious even if I cannot see the screen.  Please respect your classmates and keep unnecessary keyboard noise to a minimum. 

 

 

Email Etiquette:

Please include your name on any email correspondence.  Papers are not accepted electronically, unless noted on the assignment.  It is your responsibility to submit a stapled, hard copy of assignments. 

 

Evaluation

 

Tests - 55% (Test 1 at 15%, Test 2 and Test 3 at 20% each)

There will be three in-class tests comprised of multiple choice and short answer questions.

  Sociological Exercises–  (30%)

A series of seven short written assignments on various topics throughout the semester.  The six highest grades will be counted.  These will be submitted at your discussion section.             

 

Contribution to discussion (10%)

Excessive absences will negatively affect your grade.  Merely showing up to class, however, is not sufficient participation.   Are you contributing to the discussion?  Is it evident from your comments that you have done the reading? 

 

In-class assignments (5%)

Several times throughout the semester we will have short in-class assignments during lecture meetings.  These are not announced ahead of time, and they cannot be made up. 

 

 

Final Exam – (OPTIONAL)

For students who missed an exam for any reason (illness, overslept, death in the family, etc.) or for students on a grade borderline who wish to improve their grade.  If you decide to take the Final Exam, you may use the score (if it is higher) to replace a previous test.  For example, if you scored poorly on Test 1, you may substitute the score on the Final Exam.  Please note that the date for our class to take the final examination is Friday, May 14th  from 2-5 pm. If you think you will want or need to take the final, do not schedule travel arrangements before then.  There will be no exceptions!  It will be a cumulative exam.

 

Grades:  The final grades will be computed as follows:

 

             Essay Tests                                                           220 points            55%

Test 1         60  points                    

Test 2      80 points 

Test 3      80 points     

 

Sociological Exercises                                    120 points            30%

            (6 at 20 points each)           

           

            Contribution/participation                        40 points            10%

 

            In-class assignments                                      20 points              5%

 

            TOTAL                                                 400 points       100%

 

A            94-100%            400 – 376            C+            77-79%                 319 – 308

A-            90-93%             375 – 360            C            74-76%                    307 – 296

B+            87-89%             359 – 348            C-            70-73%                  295 – 280

B            84-86%               347 – 336            D            60-69%                    279 – 240

B-            80-83%              335 – 320            F            59% or less                239 - 0

                                                      CR            60% or more            240 +

 

Note:  If you drop this course after the twelfth class day you must have a passing grade of “C” to receive a Q drop. According to UT policy, students who are not passing will be assigned a grade of “F”.  Please refer to the General Catalog for policies related to adding and dropping courses.  You are responsible for understanding how this process works in your particular college. 

 

 

Make-up Exams:

Make-up exams will be given only for those who miss an exam for university approved events. 

You must inform me prior to the scheduled exam that you will need to make alternate arrangements.  Make-up exams MAY consist entirely of essay questions.  If you miss an exam for some other reason – illness, death in the family, overslept, ran out of gas on the way to school – you may take the optional Final Exam as a replacement score for the test you missed. 

 

Late Work:

Sociological exercises are due at the beginning of your discussion section.  Late papers will be penalized one grade per day.  Late papers will only be accepted up to two days after the due date.  Late papers should be submitted to the main sociology office (BUR 536).  The receptionist will put a date stamp on them and place them in your TA’s mailbox.

 

Grade adjustments:

Grade adjustments MAY be made for those on the borderline between two grades.  By borderline I mean those having points that would be rounded up using normal mathematical conventions.  For example, a student may have points equal to 79.6%.  This grade will not result in automatic “bumping up.”  In these cases I look at a variety of factors including a student’s participation and improvement on papers and exams throughout the semester.

 

→ Please do not ask me to give you a higher grade than you earned because you are in a special honors program, or are on academic probation or some other special circumstance.   

 

→ If you ask me to re-grade an assignment, please know that your grade may go up OR down.  In general, you can expect that discussion about your grade will be explanatory, rather than a forum for negotiating. 

 

More on grades:

If you are having trouble in the course, please come see me sooner rather than later.  Sooner: there’s a good chance we can work together to make things better.  Later: there’s a good chance you will be stuck with a lower grade than you would have liked.

 

Office Hours

I encourage you to take advantage of office hours.  Come by to introduce yourself or talk about any questions, comments or ideas you have about sociology or a specific assignment.

 

Academic Misconduct will not be tolerated and is subject to University policies.  The General Catalog of the University of Texas states:

"Scholastic dishonesty" includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, falsifying academic records, and any act designed to give unfair academic advantage to the student (such as, but not limited to, submission of essentially the same written assignment for two courses without the prior permission of the instructor, providing false or misleading information in an effort to receive a postponement or an extension on a test, quiz, or other assignment), or the attempt to commit such an act.

These actions may result in a zero on the particular assignment, failure of the course or expulsion from the University. Please see the General Catalog, Sec. 11-802 for further information.   http://www.utexas.edu/student/registrar/catalogs/gi01-02/app/appc11.html

 

All written assignments should be your own work (with the exception of group activities and projects.)  Proper citation of the work of others is essential in all assignments.

 

 

Accommodations: 

Please see me at the beginning of the semester if you require learning or testing accommodations. 

You will need a letter from the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Office. 

Contact them at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY. 

 

Resources at UT:

Undergraduate Writing Center

I recommend the Undergraduate Writing Center to those students who wish to improve their writing.  Contact them at 471-6222 or drop-in to set up an appointment. They are located in the Flawn Academic Center on the second floor (FAC 211).  (You’ve already paid for it with your student fees!)

 

UT Learning Center

Academic support and services.  Check them out at www.utexas.edu/student/utlc  or 471-3614. 

They have a variety of tips about studying, test taking, and writing.

 

 

SOC 323 • The Family

46380 • Spring 2010
Meets TTH 930-1100 BUR 130
show description

Overview

In this course we will analyze the family as a social institution, using sociological perspectives. 

Studying the family can be tricky in that we all have our own experiences being part of families.  It is important, then, to go beyond our own experiences to explore both the private aspects of the family as well as public aspects of the family using various kinds of empirical data.  Shifting definitions of the family provide a starting point for an exploration of the history of “the family”.  Throughout the course we will explore if and how the family is declining and changing using conservative, liberal, centrist and feminist perspectives. Specific topics will include parental and child roles; gender, race and social class as stratification systems which influence families; how the family intersects with, is shaped by, and shapes other social institutions, with particular attention to the economy and the world of work as well as state and social policies; and cohabitation, divorce and stepfamilies as three important changes in the US family over the last several decades.      

 

The primary objectives for this course are:

  • To use a sociological perspective in studying families, with an emphasis on diversity within and between families.
  • To think about families in societal context.           
  • To sharpen critical thinking skills by participating in class discussions and other group activities and completing writing assignments that require analysis.

 

Questions we will address include:

  • What is the definition of family? (Why is this a complicated question?)
  • What social-structural forces shape family processes?
  • How is the family a gendered institution?
  • How does government attempt to shape families?  Support families?

 

Required Texts and Materials

? A packet of 3”x5” white note cards for use during class.  Please have several note cards with you for each class.

 

 ? Ferguson, Susan J. (ed.).  2007.  Shifting the Center: Understanding Contemporary Families,            

Third Edition.  Boston: McGraw-Hill.  

 

? Coontz, Stephanie.  2006.  Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage

New York: Penguin.                

 

? Lareau, Annette.   2003. Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life. 

Berkeley: University of California Press.

 

? Stone, Pamela.  2007. Opting Out? Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home. Berkeley: University of California Press.

 

            (All books available for purchase at the Co-op on Guadalupe.)

 

? Additional readings may be posted to our BlackBoard course site. 

 

 

Reading Assignments

Readings are assigned for most class periods. I expect you to read the assigned material prior to class.  This is an upper-division course, and requires more than a cursory read. I expect that you not only read everything, but that you also think about how the readings complement or contradict one another.  What is the author’s argument? What questions occur to you as you read?  What is particularly challenging or troubling in the readings?  Please come to class prepared to participate, both in small and large groups.

 

 

Blackboard

I will post various course materials and grades on this site.  Check it frequently to stay informed about your progress.

 

Informational postings can be found on Blackboard at http://courses.utexas.edu/ 

Only students who have listed an email address at registration will have access to this site. 

To register an email address or to change your email address, go to  www.utexas.edu/cc/blackboard/tutorials/index.html.  See "For Students," "Changing Your Email Address."  Please check your access early in the semester and contact me if you have problems.

 

Attendance, Participation and Classroom Etiquette:

Regular class attendance is expected.  It also works to your advantage since lectures and class discussion will contain information for which you will be responsible, but which will not be in the required texts. In other words, lecture material, class discussion and student presentations will contain information considered “fair game” for exams.

 

I will do my best to make class time informative and engaging, but as a wise person once said, “It takes two to tango.”  Our joint venture will be mutually beneficial and enjoyable with everyone as an active participant..  An active participant is someone who has read and thought about the reading, and who comes to class ready to participate and ask questions. 

 

Because family is something which we have all experienced in one form or another, and because the study of families is embedded within a context of our own values and beliefs, it is likely that certain issues will spark strong feelings and disagreements.  It is important that each of us maintains respect for opinions other than our own and practices good listening skills.

 

Please arrive on time to class and turn off pagers, beepers and cell phones.  Unless you are bringing a relevant newspaper article to share (which I encourage), I do not want to see newspapers during class. 

 

I welcome the use of computers in the classroom if they are used as learning aids or for notetaking.  It can be handy to have someone look up a particular fact or figure during class.  The difference between typing notes and the constant back and forth of IM is obvious even if I cannot see the screen.  Please respect your classmates and keep unnecessary keyboard noise to a minimum. 

 

 

Evaluation

 

Tests (50% - 2 at 25% each)

      Short answers and short essays related to lecture, class discussions, videos, readings.

 

Class participation (20%)

A series of homework assignments are designed to facilitate active class participation.

 

 

Group Project – Poster Presentation (30%)

Groups will conduct research and present information about various family topics to the rest of the class in a poster format.  During the poster session group members will discuss relevant findings with class members.

 

The poster and presentation comprises 20% of the grade.

Individual submission of research material and a group evaluation comprises 10% of the grade.

 

 

Optional Final Paper (25%) – 5-6 pages

For students who missed an exam for any reason (illness, overslept, car problem, death in the family, etc.) or for students on a grade borderline who wish to improve their grade.  If you decide to write the Final Paper, you may use the score (if it is higher) to replace a previous test.  For example, if you scored poorly on Test 1, you may substitute the score on the Final Paper.  Please note that the Final Paper will be due Monday, May 17th by noon to BlackBoard.

 

Select a family portrayed in the media.  This could be a family in a situation comedy, in a drama, or in a comic strip.  Analyze this family using sociological concepts and theories covered in the class readings, lectures, videos and discussions.  The purpose of this assignment is to provide an arena for you to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the study of families from a sociological perspective. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grades:  The final grades will be computed as follows:

 

            Application of Course Content                         200 points            50%

                                          Test 1               100 points                   

            Test 2            100 points       

 

Poster Presentation                                                120 points            30%

                        Group grade              80 points

                        Individual grade  40 points           

 

Participation/Homework                                     80 points            20%

                                ___________________________________________________                                      

                                                            TOTAL             400 points         100%

 

 

A            94-100%            400 – 376            C+            77-79%            319 – 308

A-            90-93%            375 – 360            C            74-76%               307 – 296

B+            87-89%           359 – 348            C-            70-73%              295 – 280

B            84-86%              347 – 336            D            60-69%               279 – 240

B-            80-83%             335 – 320            F            59% or less           239 - 0

                                                      CR            60% or more            240 +

 

Note:  If you drop this course after the twelfth class day you must have a passing grade of “C” to receive a Q drop. According to UT policy, students who are not passing will be assigned a grade of “F”.  Please refer to the General Catalog for policies related to adding and dropping courses.  You are responsible for understanding how this process works in your particular college. 

 

Make-up Exams:

Make-up exams will be given for those who miss an exam for university approved reasons.  You must inform me prior to the scheduled exam that you will need to make alternate arrangements. 

Make-up exams MAY consist entirely of essay questions.  If you miss an exam for some other reason – illness, death in the family, overslept, ran out of gas on the way to school – you may write the optional Final Paper as a replacement score for the test you missed. 

 

 

Grade adjustments:

Grade adjustments MAY be made for those on the borderline between two grades.  By borderline I mean those having points that would be rounded up using normal mathematical conventions.  For example, a student may have points which equal 79.5%.  This grade will not result in automatic “bumping up.”  In these cases I look at a variety of factors including a student’s participation and improvement throughout the semester.

 

More on grades:

If you are having trouble in the course, please come see me sooner rather than later.  Sooner: there’s a good chance we can work together to make things better.  Later: there’s a good chance you will be stuck with a lower grade than you would have liked.

 

Please do not ask me to give you a higher grade than you earned because you are in a special honors program, on academic probation or have some other special circumstance.    

 

 
Office hours and other contact

I encourage you to take advantage of office hours.  Come by to introduce yourself or talk about any questions, comments or ideas you have about sociology or a specific assignment.  If you have class during my posted office hours, please talk with me to make alternate arrangements.  I welcome email – and check it frequently.  Please end your email with a name so I know to whom I’m typing!

 

 

Academic Misconduct will not be tolerated and is subject to University policies.  The General Catalog of the University of Texas states:

"Scholastic dishonesty" includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, falsifying academic records, and any act designed to give unfair academic advantage to the student (such as, but not limited to, submission of essentially the same written assignment for two courses without the prior permission of the instructor, providing false or misleading information in an effort to receive a postponement or an extension on a test, quiz, or other assignment), or the attempt to commit such an act.

These actions may result in a zero on the particular assignment, failure of the course or expulsion from the University. Please see the General Catalog, Sec. 11-802 for further information.   http://www.utexas.edu/student/registrar/catalogs/gi01-02/app/appc11.html

 

All written assignments should be your own work (with the exception of in-class group activities.) 

Proper citation of the work of others is essential in all assignments.

 

Accommodations: 

Please see me at the beginning of the semester if you require learning or testing accommodations.  Please bring a letter from the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) Office. 

Contact them at 471-6259 or 471-4641 TTY. 

 

Resources at UT:

Undergraduate Writing Center

I recommend the Undergraduate Writing Center to those students who wish to improve their writing.  Contact them at 471-6222 or drop-in to set up an appointment. They are located in the Flawn Academic Center on the second floor (FAC 211).  (You’ve already paid for it with your student fees!)

 

UT Learning Center

Academic support and services.  Check them out at www.utexas.edu/student/utlc  or 471-3614. 

They have a variety of tips about studying, test taking, and writing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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