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Robert Crosnoe, Chair CLA 3.306, Mailcode A1700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-232-6300

Amy Lodge

M.A., University of Texas at Austin

Graduate Student
Amy Lodge

Contact

Biography

 

Interests

health and well-being, aging and the life course, family, gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, the body

SOC 308 • Gender/Race/Class In Amer Soc

46290 • Spring 2014
Meets MWF 1200pm-100pm CLA 1.106
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Description:

This course is designed to reveal how gender, race, and class intersect to structure individuals and groups’ life advantages and disadvantages in institutional arenas such as work, the family, education, health, the criminal justice system, popular culture and more.  The goal of this course is to learn how to apply a sociological perspective to analyze how individual and group life chances are shaped by broader structures of privilege and disadvantage based on gender, race, and class.

Required Readings:

• The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender 2nd edition. Editors: Grusky & Szelenyi (available at the University Coop and online)

• Course packet of additional readings (available at Paradigm Copies on 24th Street)

Grading and Requirements:

• Class Participation/ Engagement: Students are responsible for reading all assigned materials before coming to class. Once in class, students are required to demonstrate engagement with the material. This means, above all, respect for our learning environment. Please be respectful of others’ opinions and experiences, please arrive on time, and stay the entire class period unless you have informed the Professor that you will need to leave early. Attendance is not required. The use of email, social networking sites, and phones during class are strictly prohibited.

Course Requirements and Evaluation:

 

SOC 308 • Gender/Race/Class In Amer Soc

46070 • Fall 2013
Meets TTH 1230pm-200pm CLA 1.106
show description

Description:

This course is designed to reveal how gender, race, and class intersect to structure individuals and groups’ life advantages and disadvantages in institutional arenas such as work, the family, education, health, the criminal justice system, popular culture and more.  The goal of this course is to learn how to apply a sociological perspective to analyze how individual and group life chances are shaped by broader structures of privilege and disadvantage based on gender, race, and class.

Required Readings:

• The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender 2nd edition. Editors: Grusky & Szelenyi (available at the University Coop and online)

• Course packet of additional readings (available at Paradigm Copies on 24th Street)

Grading and Requirements:

• Class Participation/ Engagement: Students are responsible for reading all assigned materials before coming to class. Once in class, students are required to demonstrate engagement with the material. This means, above all, respect for our learning environment. Please be respectful of others’ opinions and experiences, please arrive on time, and stay the entire class period unless you have informed the Professor that you will need to leave early. Attendance is not required. The use of email, social networking sites, and phones during class are strictly prohibited.

Course Requirements and Evaluation:

• Exams (60%): There will be three exams in this course, each worth 20% of your total grade. Exams will be multiple-choice format No make-up exams will be given without prior approval from the Professor. 

• Social Issue Papers (30%): Students are required to write two “social issue” papers for the course, each worth 15% of your total grade. Social issue papers are 3-4 page double-spaced papers that address a contemporary social issue or problem related to gender, race, and/or class (i.e. racial discrimination in the criminal justice system; gender tracking in the education system). Roughly one page should consist of a description of the social issue (outside research is highly encouraged). The remainder of the paper should consist of a sociological analysis of the social problem that integrates concepts, theories, and/or readings from the course (i.e. how do social inequalities, institutional factors, and/or social meanings help us to understand the issue).

• Observation Papers (10%): Observational papers will consist of “pop” in-class response papers that relate to course material (readings & lecture). There will ten observation papers throughout the semester, each worth one point each. No makeup papers will be given, barring 1) a religious holiday 2) a serious illness or death in the family (documentation is required)

Final Grades: are based on the standard scale set by the University, whereby: 93- 100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+;73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F

*No Extra Credit Opportunities will be given.

SOC F321K • Sex & Violence In Pop Culture

88480 • Summer 2012
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am BUR 108
(also listed as WGS F345 )
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Description

This course is designed to present the familiar world of popular culture in a new light.  From a sociological perspective, culture provides us with a lens to examine our collective values, beliefs, fears, and dreams.  Popular culture reflects, reproduces, shapes, and sometimes challenges our understanding of the world around us and ourselves. Sex and violence are common themes in popular culture, yet the ways in which they are represented reflect larger socio-cultural, historical, economic, political forces.  Students will learn to be become critical and reflective viewers of popular culture by analyzing the larger forces and belief systems that shape cultural representations.  A key focus of this course concerns the ways in which cultural depictions reflect, reproduce, or challenge social inequalities of race/ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.  

Required Texts 

 Course packet from Paradigm Copies

Grades

Grades will be based on exams, media response papers, and in-class writing assignments. 

 

 

SOC 308 • Gender/Race/Class In Amer Soc

45425 • Spring 2012
Meets MWF 900am-1000am BUR 108
show description

Description:

This course is designed to reveal how gender, race, and class intersect to structure individuals and groups’ life advantages and disadvantages in institutional arenas such as work, the family, education, health, the criminal justice system, popular culture and more.  The goal of this course is to learn how to apply a sociological perspective to analyze how individual and group life chances are shaped by broader structures of privilege and disadvantage based on gender, race, and class.

Required Readings:

The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender 2nd edition. Editors: Grusky & Szelenyi (available at the University Coop and online)

• Course packet of additional readings (available at Paradigm Copies on 24th Street)

Grading and Requirements:

• Class Participation/ Engagement: Students are responsible for reading all assigned materials before coming to class. Once in class, students are required to demonstrate engagement with the material. This means, above all, respect for our learning environment. Please be respectful of others’ opinions and experiences, please arrive on time, and stay the entire class period unless you have informed the Professor that you will need to leave early. Attendance is not required. The use of email, social networking sites, and phones during class are strictly prohibited.

Course Requirements and Evaluation:

Exams (60%): There will be three exams in this course, each worth 20% of your total grade. Exams will be multiple-choice format No make-up exams will be given without prior approval from the Professor. 

Social Issue Papers (30%): Students are required to write two “social issue” papers for the course, each worth 15% of your total grade. Social issue papers are 3-4 page double-spaced papers that address a contemporary social issue or problem related to gender, race, and/or class (i.e. racial discrimination in the criminal justice system; gender tracking in the education system). Roughly one page should consist of a description of the social issue (outside research is highly encouraged). The remainder of the paper should consist of a sociological analysis of the social problem that integrates concepts, theories, and/or readings from the course (i.e. how do social inequalities, institutional factors, and/or social meanings help us to understand the issue).

Observation Papers (10%): Observational papers will consist of “pop” in-class response papers that relate to course material (readings & lecture). There will ten observation papers throughout the semester, each worth one point each. No makeup papers will be given, barring 1) a religious holiday 2) a serious illness or death in the family (documentation is required)

Final Grades: are based on the standard scale set by the University, whereby: 93-100%= A; 90-92.9% = A-; 87-89.9% = B+; 83-86.9%=B; 80-82.9%= B-; 77-79.9% = C+;73-76.9%= C; 70-72.9%=C; 67-69.9% = D+; 63-66.9= D; 60-62.9%= D-; <60 = F

*No Extra Credit Opportunities will be given.

SOC 308 • Gender/Race/Class In Amer Soc

45262 • Fall 2011
Meets MWF 100pm-200pm NOA 1.102
show description

This course explores the ways in which broader structures of privilege and disadvantage in American society intersect to shape individuals’ lives.  We will examine the ways in which inequalities of gender, race, class, and sexuality shape individuals’ experiences in a wide-range of institutional realms: marriage and the family, education, employment, the political system, health care, the criminal justice system, and the media. 

SOC F321K • Sex & Violence In Pop Culture

88535 • Summer 2011
Meets MTWTHF 1000am-1130am PAI 4.42
(also listed as WGS F345 )
show description

Description:

 This course is designed to present the familiar world of popular culture in a new light.  From a sociological perspective, culture provides us with a lens to examine our collective values, beliefs, fears, and dreams.  Popular culture reflects, reproduces, shapes, and sometimes challenges our understanding of the world around us and ourselves. Sex and violence are common themes in popular culture, yet the ways in which they are represented reflect larger socio-cultural, historical, economic, political forces.  Students will learn to be become critical and reflective viewers of popular culture by analyzing the larger forces and belief systems that shape cultural representations.  A key focus of this course concerns the ways in which cultural depictions reflect, reproduce, or challenge social inequalities of class, race/ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. 

Required Texts: 

  • Gender, Race, and Class in Media: A Critical Reader 3rd Ed. By Gail Dines and Jean M. Humez (available at the University co-op)
  •  Course packet of additional readings


 

Publications

PEER-REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES:

Reczek, Corinne, Mieke Beth Thomeer, Amy C. Lodge, Debra Umberson, and Megan Underhill.  Forthcoming. “Diet and Exercise in Parenthood: A Social Control Perspective.” Journal of Marriage and Family.

Lodge, Amy C. and Debra Umberson. 2013. “Age and Embodied Masculinities: Midlife Gay and Heterosexual Men Talk about their Bodies.” Journal of Aging Studies 27(3): 225-232.

Lodge, Amy C. and Debra Umberson. 2012.  “All Shook Up: Sexuality of Mid to Later Life Married Couples.”  Journal of Marriage and Family 74(3): 428-443.

BOOK CHAPTER:

Lodge, Amy C. and Debra Umberson. Forthcoming. “Sexual Intimacy among Mid to Later Life Couples.” To appear in Couple Relationships in Mid and Late Life: Current Perspectives, edited by J. Bookwala. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. 

ENCYCLOPEDIA ENTRIES AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS:

Lodge, Amy C. and Debra Umberson. 2014. “Family Status and Mental Health” pp. 1471–1476 in The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Health, Illness, Behavior, and Society, edited by W.C. Cockerham, R. Dingwall and S. Quah. New York: Wiley Blackwell.

Lodge, Amy C. 2014. “Parenthood, Childlessness, and Wellbeing” pp. 4603-4608 in Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research, edited byAlex C. Michalos. New York: Springer.

Lodge, Amy C. and Brandon Andrew Robinson. 2013. “Austin Summit on LGBT Families Report.” Footnotes 41(5): 6.

BOOK REVIEW:

Lodge, Amy.  2009.  Book review of Risky Lessons: Sexual Education and Social Inequality, by Jessica Fields.  Sociological Insight 1(1): 162-165

 

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