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Jill Robbins, Chair 150 W 21st Street, Stop B3700, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-4936

Jacqueline Toribio

Professor Ph.D., Cornell University

Jacqueline Toribio

Contact

Biography

Almeida Jacqueline Toribio is Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at The University of Texas at Austin. Her scholarly interests reside at the intersection of linguistics and the sociology of language. Her research itinerary in linguistics examines the ways in which the structural facts of contact and rural varieties of Spanish can be brought to bear on issues central to linguistic theorizing, which has proceeded largely by reference to the language knowledge and use of highly literate, monolingual individuals. Of interest are the phonological, morpho-syntactic, and discursive forms that emerge among monolinguals and bilinguals in the absence of literacy and other normative pressures. A second, related line of research in sociology of language is founded on her abiding concern with the contributions of specific language behaviors, attitudes, and dispositions to the understanding of the configurations of communities and societies in which speakers find themselves. Of particular relevance are the ideologies surrounding language maintenance and identity formation in contexts of cultural contact, as in the case of speakers of Spanish language heritage in the United States and persons residing at the border between the Dominican Republic and Haiti. She has co-edited, with Barbara Bullock, The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching and a special issue of Bilingualism: Language and Cognition devoted to bilingual convergence and she has edited a special issue of Lingua highlighting syntactic-theoretical perspectives on code-switching. Her research has been presented in notable journals, including Linguistic Inquiry, Lingua, Bilingualism: Language & Cognition, International Journal of Bilingualism, Spanish in Context, Linguistics, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, Probus, and Revista Internacional de Lingüística Iberoamericana.

Interests

Bilingualism and Language Contact, Morphology, Syntax, Sociolinguistics, Caribbean Studies, US Latino and Border Studies, Afro-Latin American and African Studies

ILA 381 • Introduction To Linguistics

46575 • Fall 2014
Meets M 200pm-500pm BEN 1.118
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COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course is divided into four parts, each with a specific purpose and attendant requirements.

      I.     The structure of Spanish (Weeks 1-4) Reinforces students’ knowledge of the core phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of Spanish; knowledge will be further bolstered with in-class exercises and assessed with in-class quizzes.

     II.     Spanish in context (Weeks 5-6) Examines the diachronic and synchronic variation presented by Spanish; students additionally explore the variation manifest in diverse contemporary contact settings through collaborative presentation of a selected reading.

   III.     Approaches to the study of Spanish (Weeks 7-10) Exposes students to diverse areas of linguistic study, including major questions and methodological issues, modeled by the research agendas of departmental faculty and advanced doctoral candidates; students will enhance their appreciation of linguistic disciplines and develop their academic skills with critical review assignments and peer editing.

  • Area: Sociolinguistics
  • Area: Language contact and bilingualism
  • Discourse-pragmatics
  • Second language acquisition theories and pedagogies

   IV.     Posing and pursuing research questions (Weeks 11-15) Guides students in developing a research proposal, from articulation of a research question, to review of relevant literature and selection of methodologies for language study, to determination of the potential significance and larger benefits of the research; students will elaborate the research proposal under the supervision of a chosen faculty member.

The detailed syllabus will be delivered in segments, following the course outline above.

GRADING: Several components of the course will be graded:

  • Quizzes (3): 30%
  • Presentation: 10%
  • Critical reviews (3): 30%
  • Paper Proposal: 30%

MATERIALS: Course materials will be posted on Blackboard or distributed in class. Readings are drawn from introductory textbooks, including Introducción de la lingüística hispánica (2009, Hualde et al. eds.), various recent handbooks, among these, The Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics (2012, Hualde et al., eds.) and The Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics (2011, Díaz-Campos, ed.), and research articles drawn from professionals journals and other compendia.

 

ILA 381 • Introduction To Linguistics

46540 • Fall 2013
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BEN 1.108
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COURSE OVERVIEW: The course is divided into four parts, each with a specific purpose and attendant requirements.

      I.     The structure of Spanish (Weeks 1-4) Reinforces students’ knowledge of the core phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of Spanish; knowledge will be further bolstered with in-class exercises and assessed with in-class quizzes.

     II.     Spanish in context (Weeks 5-6) Examines the diachronic and synchronic variation presented by Spanish; students additionally explore the variation manifest in diverse contemporary contact settings through collaborative presentation of a selected reading.

   III.     Approaches to the study of Spanish (Weeks 7-10) Exposes students to diverse areas of linguistic study, including major questions and methodological issues, modeled by the research agendas of departmental faculty and advanced doctoral candidates; students will enhance their appreciation of linguistic disciplines and develop their academic skills with critical review assignments and peer editing.

  • Area: Sociolinguistics
  • Area: Language contact and bilingualism
  • Discourse-pragmatics
  • Second language acquisition theories and pedagogies

   IV.     Posing and pursuing research questions (Weeks 11-15) Guides students in developing a research proposal, from articulation of a research question, to review of relevant literature and selection of methodologies for language study, to determination of the potential significance and larger benefits of the research; students will elaborate the research proposal under the supervision of a chosen faculty member.

The detailed syllabus will be delivered in segments, following the course outline above.

GRADING: Several components of the course will be graded:

  • Quizzes (3): 30%
  • Presentation: 10%
  • Critical reviews (3): 30%
  • Paper Proposal: 30%

MATERIALS: Course materials will be posted on Blackboard or distributed in class. Readings are drawn from introductory textbooks, including Introducción de la lingüística hispánica (2009, Hualde et al. eds.), various recent handbooks, among these, The Handbook of Hispanic Linguistics (2012, Hualde et al., eds.) and The Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics (2011, Díaz-Campos, ed.), and research articles drawn from professionals journals and other compendia.

 

SPN 383M • Spanish In Texas

46945 • Spring 2013
Meets TH 900am-1200pm UTC 3.120
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Course Description

The seminar invites students to a careful consideration of Spanish, as it spoken in Texas, with attention to the individual, regional, and socio-cultural factors implicated in the variation it presents. The goal of the course is to understand the nature of language variation in order to provide information about local Spanish language varieties for scholarly, educational, and public interests. Thus, the course is focused as much on research as on outreach, addressing the empirical questions that local Spanish variation raises for researchers and the educational implications for students, educators, and the general public.

The course begins with a review various relevant literatures, including socio-historical treatments on the presence of Spanish in Texas and linguistic and sociolinguistic studies of Spanish focused on all levels of analysis.  The course then turns to the theoretical approaches and methods that will be relevant in the study of language variation and the application to naturally occurring data. The course culminates in the elaboration of a final paper, which may take one of two forms—a report of original empirical research or a lesson plan for educators; while the paper may address any Spanish language data set, students are encouraged to draw on the corpus of the Spanish in Texas Project.

The course will be largely organized as a seminar, consisting of lectures, presentations, guided discussion, and participation in group activities. There will also be several guest lectures from local faculty engaged in pertinent research, e.g., in history, sociology, and education.

Knowledge of Spanish is required. The course will be conducted in Spanish and/or English.

Materials

Readings, assignments, and Powerpoint slides will be posted on Blackboard.

Course Requirement and Grading

Several components of the course will be evaluated: participation in class, including familiarity with reading and collaboration in group tasks; an exam on the structure of Spanish; analysis and discussion of several Spanish language data sets; presentation and submission of the final paper.

10%: Participation

20%: Exam

20%: Linguistic analyses

10%: Presentation

40%: Final paper 

SPN 393T • Meths Of Study In Spanish Ling

46750 • Fall 2012
Meets W 400pm-700pm GEA 127
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GRADUATE STUDIES I (HISPANIC LINGUISTICS)

DESCRIPTION

 This course is an introduction to the prevalent theories, discourses, and methods relevant to the study of the language forms and language practices of individuals and societies. As such, it introduces students to the fields of phonetics/phonology, morpho-syntax, pragmatics/discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, and second language acquisition, and prepares them to read and understand research in these areas. Course materials will include overview chapters that represent diverse frameworks, including theoretical and applied approaches, and research articles that reflect various methodological and interpretive orientations. The course seeks to assist students in developing an appreciation of fields of linguistic study as well as train them for specialized academic writing.

Students will dedicate the first weeks of the course to preparing written assignments based on the readings. In subsequent weeks, students prepare oral presentations, in English or Spanish, based on assigned readings. By the fourth week of the semester students will choose a faculty mentor in a selected area of specialization with whom they will develop a professional relationship and who will work with them in the development of a research paper. A draft of the research paper with an annotated bibliography will be completed by the end of the first semester; the paper will be completed in the second semester. Students will be graded on their analyses of theoretical readings, their writing, their oral presentations and their participation in class. Participation and attendance are required for all entering students.

 

SPN 346 • Practical Phonetics

46560 • Spring 2012
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BUR 208
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SPN 383N • Seminar On Codeswitching

46670 • Spring 2012
Meets T 1000am-100pm UTC 1.136
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SPN 383M • Dominican Spanish

46595 • Fall 2011
Meets MW 330pm-500pm BEN 1.118
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Dominican and Contact Spanish 

Course description

This course presents an overview of the language situation of established monolingual Spanish communities and long-standing and emerging bilingual communities in the Caribbean and in the United States. We will address language and dialect convergence in the domains of phonology/phonetics and morpho-syntax through the analysis of phenomena such as borrowing, code-switching, leveling, accommodation, and attrition. Particular attention is devoted to the dynamics between the language-internal and language-external factors that constrain the mechanisms of language change and the outcomes of language change. We will draw on seminal readings and more recent empirical studies (as well as some overlooked, early work) that represent a broad array of research paradigms and interpretive frameworks.

Course requirements

• Attendance and active participation: careful preparation and discussion of required readings and completion of

(ungraded) in‐class and out‐of‐class activities.

• Several components of the course will be graded, each described in turn.

40% Written assignments (4)

Each student will select four focus articles from the list of ‘additional readings’ for brief (750‐1000

word) critical evaluation. The evaluation of the research presented should succinctly summarize the

work, highlight points of contrast/convergence with extant literature, post pertinent unanswered

questions, and, where possible, offer novel insights on some aspect of the topic under study (i.e.,

move beyond a simple summary). Guidelines for preparing critical reviews will be provided and due

dates are specified on the syllabus.

20% Presentations

Students will select a focus article for a twenty‐minute individual or collaborative presentation; the

presentation should be accompanied by a visual aid (handout and/or Powerpoint). Research articles

will be drawn from those marked with an asterisk in ‘additional readings’ in Sections IV‐VII (see

overview).

40% Research proposal

Each student will be required to present a written proposal for research on any aspect of U.S.

contact Spanish. The paper must include a literature review, a compelling purpose, a conceptual

framework, and a well‐articulated methodology. It may be a replication of an extant study or a

novel proposal. (In the best case, the student would carry out the work in subsequent semesters.)

We will dedicate several class sessions to the development of the research proposal.

Research topic: due Monday, November 14

Annotated bibliography: due Monday, November 21

Presentation of project proposal: November 28 and 30

Written paper, due by December 12

Course materials

• Course readings, handouts, Powerpoint presentations, and assignments will be posted on Blackboard, the University

course management system; additional materials will be made available in class.

Course overview

 I. Introduction: Fictions and facts about U.S. Spanish and its speakers

II. Varieties of Spanish in the U.S.

III. Contact language and linguistics: conceptual issues

IV. Dialect contact and accommodation

V. Language contact: Borrowing and code‐switching

VI. Congruence and convergence

VII. Variation in competence and style

VIII. Research project

Syllabus: Contact Spanish in the United States

 I. Introduction: Fictions and facts about U.S. Spanish and its speakers

Wednesday, August 24

Myths about U.S. Spanish and its speakers

Monday, August 29

A demographic portrait

US Census data and Pew Hispanic Center Reports

Wednesday, August 31

Hispanics and Spanish in Texas

[Monday, September 5: Holiday]

 II. Varieties of Spanish in the U.S.

Wednesday, September 7

Spanish in the Southwest: Mexican‐American Spanish

 Required reading

  Silva‐Corval.n, C. 2004. Spanish in the Southwest. In Language in the USA: themes for the 21st century, E.

Finegan and J. Rickford (eds.), 205‐229. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Monday, September 12

Spanish in the Northeast and Florida: Caribbean

 Required reading

  Zentella, A.C. 2004. Spanish in the Northeast. In Language in the USA: themes for the 21st century, E.

Finegan and J. Rickford (eds.), 182‐204. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

  Otheguy, R., O. Garc.a, and A. Roca. 2000. Speaking in Cuban: the language of Cuban Americans. In New

immigrants in the United States, S. McKay and S. Wong (eds.), 165‐188. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge

University Press.

Wednesday, September 14

Other varieties: Brule and Isle.o Spanish in Louisiana; Traditional Southwest Spanish in New Mexico

 Required reading

  Holloway, C. 1997. Divergent twins: Isle.o and Brule Spanish in Louisiana. Southwest Journal of Linguistics

17: 55‐72.

Varieties of Spanish in the U.S.: Additional readings

o Lipski, J. 2008. Varieties of Spanish in the United States. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

o Bills, G. and N. Vigil. 2008. The Spanish language of New Mexico and southern Colorado: a linguistic atlas.

Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.

o Bills, G. 1997. New Mexican Spanish: Demise of the earliest European variety in the United States. American

Speech 72: 154‐171.

o Zentella, A.C. 1997. Growing up bilingual: Puerto Rican children in New York. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

o Mendoza‐Denton, N. 1999. Sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology of US Latinos. Annual Review of

Anthropology 28: 375‐395.

o S.nchez, R. 1982. Our linguistic and social context. In Spanish in the United States: sociolinguistic

perspectives, J. Amastae and L. El.as‐Olivares, 9‐46. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

o Poplack, S. 1983. Bilingual competence: linguistic interference or grammatical integrity? In Spanish in the

U.S. setting: beyond the Southwest, L. El.as‐Olivares (ed.), 107‐129. Rosslyn, VA: National Clearinghouse for

Bilingual Education.

o Ornstein‐Galicia, J. 1981. Varieties of Southwest Spanish: Some neglected basic constructions. In Latino

language and communicative behavior, R. Dur.n (ed.), 19‐38. Norwood, NJ: ABLEX Publishing.

 III. Language contact and contact linguistics: conceptual issues

Monday, September 19

The field of contact linguistics

 Required reading

  Winford, D. 2003. An introduction to contact linguistics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. (Chapter 1)

Wednesday, September 21

The ‘failure of linguistic constraints’

 Required reading

  Thomason, S. and T. Kaufman. 1988. Language contact, creolization, and genetic linguistics. Berkeley:

University of California Press. (Chapter 2: The failure of linguistic constraints on linguistic interference

Monday, September 26

New views on language change

 Required reading

  Muysken, P. 2010. Scenarios for language contact. In The handbook of language contact, R. Hickey (ed.),

265‐281. West‐Sussex, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell.

Language contact and linguistics: Additional reading

o Thomason, S. 2010. Contact explanations in linguistics. In The handbook of language contact, R. Hickey

(ed.), 31‐47. West‐Sussex, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell.

o Labov, W. 2007. Transmission and diffusion. Language 83: 344‐387.

o Sankoff, G. 2002. Linguistic outcomes of language contact. In The handbook of language variation and

change, J. K. Chambers, P. Trudgill and N. Schilling‐Estes (eds.), 638‐668. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing

o Muysken, P. 2004. Two linguistic systems in contact: Grammar, phonology and lexicon. In The handbook of

bilingualism, T. Bhatia and W. Ritchie (eds.), 147‐167. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell.

o Hickey, R. 2010. Language contact: reconsideration and reassessment. In The handbook of language

contact, R. Hickey (ed.), 1‐28. West‐Sussex, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell.

o Lüdi, G. 2006. Multilingual repertoires and the consequences for linguistic theory. In Beyond

misunderstanding: linguistic analyses of intercultural communication, K. Bührig and J. ten Thije (eds.),11‐42.

Amsterdam: Benjamins.

 IV. Dialect contact and accommodation

Wednesday, September 28

Morphosyntax

 Required reading

  Otheguy, R., A.C. Zentella, and D. Livert. 2007. Language and dialect contact in Spanish in New York:

toward the formation of a speech community. Language 83: 770‐802.

Monday, October 3

Phonology

 Required reading

  Aaron, J. and J.E. Hern.ndez. 2007. Quantitative evidence for contact‐induced accommodation. In

Language in contact: policy, social and linguistic inquiries, K. Potowski and R. Cameron (eds.), 329‐343.

Amsterdam: Johna Benjamins

*Critical Review #1 due

Dialect contact: Additional readings

o *Rivera‐Mills, S. 2011. Use of voseo and Latino identity: an intergenerational study of Hondurans and

Salvadorans in the Western region of the U.S. In Selected proceedings of the 13th Hispanic Linguistics

Symposium, L. Ortiz‐L.pez (ed.), 94‐106. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.

o *Bayley, R., N. C.rdenas, B. Trevi.o Schouten, and C. Martin V.lez. 2011. Spanish dialect contact in San

Antonio, Texas: An exploratory study. Paper presented at the 2010 Hispanic Linguistics Symposium.

o Potowski, K. 2011. Intrafamilial dialect contact. In M. D.az‐Campos (ed.), The handbook of Hispanic

sociolinguistics, 579‐597. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing.

o Zentella, A.C. 1990. Lexical leveling in four New York City Spanish dialects: Linguistic and social factors.

Hispania 73: 1094‐1105.

o Hern.ndez, J.E. 2009. Measuring rates of word‐final nasal velarization: The effect of dialect contact on ingroup

and out‐group exchanges. Journal of Sociolinguistics 13: 583‐612.

o Amastae, J. and D. Satcher. 1993. Linguistic assimilation in two variables. Language Variation and Change 5:

77‐90.

 V. Language contact: Borrowing and code‐switching

Wednesday, October 5

Borrowing: Nouns

 Required reading

  Otheguy, R. and N. Lapidus. 2003. An adaptive approach to noun gender in New York contact Spanish. In A

Romance perspective on language knowledge and use, R. Cameron, L. L.pez and R. N..ez‐Cede.o (eds.),

209‐229. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

  Jenkins, D. 2003. Bilingual verb constructions in Southwestern Spanish. Bilingual Review/ La Revista

Bilingüe 27:195‐204.

Monday, October 10

Borrowing: Discourse markers

 Required reading nouns

  Torres, L. 2002. Bilingual discourse markers in Puerto Rican Spanish. Language in Society 31: 65‐83.

Wednesday, October 12

Code‐switching: overview

 Required reading

  Bullock, B. and A.J. Toribio. 2009. Themes in the study of code‐switching. In The Cambridge handbook of

linguistic code‐switching, B. Bullock and A.J. Toribio (eds.), 1‐17. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press

Monday, October 17

Code‐switching: morpho‐syntax

 Required reading

  Poplack, S. 1980. Sometimes I’ll start in Spanish y termino en espa.ol: toward a typology of code‐switching.

Linguistics 18: 581‐618.

 Pfaff, C. 1979. Constraints on language mixing: code‐switching and borrowing in Spanish/English, Language

55: 291‐318.

Wednesday, October 19

Phonetics

 Required reading

  Bullock, B.E. and A.J. Toribio 2009. Trying to hit a moving target: On the sociophonetics of code‐switching.

In Multidisciplinary approaches to code switching, L. Isurin, D. Winford, and K. de Bot (eds.), 189‐206.

Amsterdam: Benjamins.

*Critical Review #2 due

Code‐switching: Additional readings

o *Montes‐Alcal., C. and N. Lapidus Shin. 2011. Las keys versus el key: Feminine gender assignment in mixedlanguage

texts. Spanish in Context 8: 119‐143.

o *Pletsch de Garc.a, K. 2002, .ALA! Linguistic innovations and the blending of cultures on the South Texas

border,” Southwest Journal of Linguistics 1: 1‐15.

o *Callahan, L. 2002. The Matrix Language Frame model and Spanish/English codeswitching in fiction.

Language & Communication 22: 1‐16.

o *Matus‐Mendoza, M. 2002. The English lexical loan: a class marker. Journal of Hispanic Higher Education 1:

329‐337.

o *Fairclough, M. 2009. Spanish/English interaction in US Hispanic heritage learners’ writing. In Globalization

and language in the Spanish speaking world: macro and micro perspectives, C. Mar‐Molinero and M.

Stewart (eds.), 76‐93. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

o Muysken, P. 2000. Bilingual speech: a typology of code‐mixing. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

o Bullock, B. and A.J. Toribio (eds.). 2009. The Cambridge handbook of linguistic code‐switching. Cambridge,

UK: Cambridge University Press.

o MacSwan, J. 2008. Code switching and grammatical theory. In The handbook of bilingualism, T. Bhatia and

W. Ritchie (eds.), 283‐311. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley‐Blackwell.

o Belazi, H., E. Rubin, and A.J. Toribio. 1994. Code‐switching and X‐bar theory: The Functional Head

Constraint. Linguistic Inquiry 25: 221‐237.

o Olson, D. and M. Ortega‐Llebaria. 2010. The perceptual relevance of code switching and intonation in

creating narrow focus. In Selected proceedings of the 4th Conference on laboratory Approaches to Spanish

Phonology, M. Ortega‐Llebaria (ed.), 57‐68. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.

o Shenk, P. 2006. The interactional and syntactic importance of prosody in Spanish‐English bilingual

discourse. International Journal of Bilingualism 10, 179‐205.

o Timm, L. 1975. Spanish‐English code‐switching: el por qu. y how‐not‐to. Romance Philology 28: 473‐482.

o Otheguy, R. and N. Stern. 2011. On so‐called Spanglish. International Journal of Bilingualism 15: 85‐100.

o Sobin, N. 1982. Texas Spanish and lexical borrowing. In Spanish in the United States: sociolinguistic

perspectives, J. Amastae and L. El.as‐Olivares, 166‐181 Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

o Reyes, R. 1981. Independent convergence in Chicano and New York City Puerto Rican bilingualism. In Latino

language and communicative behavior, R. Dur.n (ed.), 39‐48. Norwood, NJ: ABLEX Publishing.

o Barkin, F. 1981. The role of loanword assimilation in gender assignment. Bilingual Review 8: 1‐13.

 VI. Congruence and convergence

Monday, October 24

Language contact and language change

 Required reading

  Silva‐Corval.n, C. 2008. The limits of convergence in language contact. Journal of Language Contact Thema

II: 212‐225.

Wednesday, October 26

Contact and congruence: morpho‐syntax

 Required reading

  Lapidus, N. and R. Otheguy. 2005. Contact induced change? Overt nonspecific ellos in Spanish in New York.

In L. Sayahi and M. Westmoreland (eds.) Selected Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Spanish

Sociolinguistics 67‐75. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.

Monday, October 31

Contact and convergence

 Required reading

  Bullock, B.E. and A.J. Toribio. 2004. Introduction: Convergence as an emergent property of bilingual

speech. Bilingualism: Language & Cognition 7: 91‐93.

  Toribio, A.J. 2004. Convergence as an optimization strategy in Spanish‐English code‐switching. Bilingualism:

Language and Cognition 7: 165‐173.

*Critical Review #3 due

Congruence and convergence: Additional reading

o *Montrul, S. 2004. Subject and object expression in Spanish heritage speakers: A case of morphosyntactic

convergence. Bilingualism: Language & Cognition 7: 125‐142.

o *Alvord, S. 2010. Variation in Miami Cuban Spanish interrogative intonation. Hispania 93: 235‐255.

o *Brown, E. and D. Harper. 2009. Phonological evidence of interlingual exemplar connections. Studies in

Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics 2, 257‐274.

o Ra.a Risso, R. 2010. Subject pronoun placement as evidence of contact and leveling in Spanish in New York.

International Journal of the Sociology of Language 203: 101‐114.

o Otheguy, R. 2011. Functional adaptation and conceptual convergence in the analysis of language contact in

the Spanish of bilingual communities in New York. In M. D.az‐Campos (ed.), The handbook of Hispanic

sociolinguistics, 504‐529. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing

o Lynch, A. 2008. A sociolinguistic analysis of final /s/ in Miami Cuban Spanish. Language Sciences 31: 766‐

790.

o Lantolf, J. 1983. Toward a comparative dialectology of U.S. Spanish. In Spanish in the U.S. setting: beyond

the Southwest, L. El.as‐Olivares (ed.), 3‐20. Rosslyn, VA: National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education.

o Dvorak, T. 1983. Subject‐object reversals in the use of gustar among New York Hispanics. In Spanish in the

U.S. setting: beyond the Southwest, L. El.as‐Olivares (ed.), 21‐36. Rosslyn, VA: National Clearinghouse for

Bilingual Education.

 VII. Variation in competence and style

Wednesday, November 2

Registers

 Required reading

 Vald.s, G. and M. Geoffrion‐Vinci 1998. Chicano Spanish: The problem of the “underdeveloped” code in

bilingual repertoires,” The Modern Language Journal 82: 473‐501.

Monday, November 7

Grammatical knowledge

 Required reading

 Polinsky, M. and O. Kagan. 2007. Heritage languages: in the ‘wild’ and in the classroom. Language and

Linguistics Compass 1: 368‐395.

Wednesday, November 9

Establishing a baseline for U.S. Spanish

 Required reading

 TBA

*Critical Review #4 due

Variation in competence and style: Additional readings

o *MacSwan, J. 2000. The threshold hypothesis, semilingualism, and other contributions to a deficit view of

linguistic minorities. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 22: 3‐45.

o *Montrul, S. 2009. Knowledge of tense‐aspect and mood in Spanish heritage speakers. International Journal

of Linguistics 3: 239‐269.

o Vald.s, G. 2001. Heritage language students: profiles and possibilities. . In Heritage languages in America:

Preserving a national resource, J. Peyton, D. Ranard, and S. McGinnis (eds.), 37‐77. McHenry, IL : Center for

Applied Linguistics

o Montrul, S. 2010. Current issues in heritage language acquisition. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics 30: 3‐

23.

 VIII. Research projects

Monday, November 14: Research tutorial

*Due: Research topic

Wednesday, November 16: Articulating a research question and selecting appropriate methods

Monday, November 21: Writing a research proposal/report

*Due: Annotated bibliography

Wednesday, November 23: Holiday

Monday, November 28: Presentations of research proposal

Wednesday, November 30: Presentations of research proposal

*Written research paper, due by December 12

Publications

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. Forthcoming. “Code-switching among U.S. Latinos.” In Handbook of Hispanic Sociolinguistics, M. Diaz-Campos (ed.). Oxford: Blackwell-Wiley.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline and González, Kay. Forthcoming. “Constraints on operator movement in English-Spanish codeswitching: Generative perspectives, from Government-Binding to Minimalism,” in Grammatical Theory and Bilingual Codeswitching, J. MacSwan (ed.). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline Toribio. 2011. “Correcting the record on Dominican [s] -hypercorrection.” In Romance Linguistics 2009, S. Colina, A. Olarrea, and A. Carvalho (eds.), 15-24. New York: John Benjamin.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2010. “Introduction. Ethnicity and language: Identity issues in the U.S. Southwest.” In Spanish of the U.S. Southwest: A language in transition, S. Rivera-Mills and D. Villa (eds.), 255-264. Madrid: Vervuert

Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (eds.). 2009. The Cambridge Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching. Cambridge University Press.

Bullock, Barbara and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. “Reconsidering Dominican Spanish: Data from the rural Cibao.” Revista Internacional de Lingüística Iberoamericana 14:49-73.

Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. “How to hit a moving target: On the sociophonetics of code-switching.” In Multidisciplinary approaches to code switching, L. Isurin, D. Winford, and K. de Bot (eds.), 189-206. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009.  “Language attitudes and linguistic outcomes in Reading, PA.” In Language allegiances and bilingualism in the U.S., M. R. Salaberry (ed.), 24-41. Multilingual Matters

Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2009. “Themes in the study of code-switching.” In The Handbook of Linguistic Code-switching, B. Bullock and A.J. Toribio (eds.), 1-17. Cambridge University Press

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (Guest Ed.) 2008. Lingua. Special issue: Formal approaches to code-switching.

Anderson, Tyler and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2007. “Attitudes towards borrowing versus code-switching.” Spanish in Context 4: 217-240

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Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2007. “Kreyol incursions into Dominican Spanish: The percept of Haitianized speech among Dominicans.” In Linguistic identity and bilingualism, M. Niño-Murcia and J. Rothman (eds.), 175-198. John Benjamins Publishers

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Jensen, Leif, Cohen, Jeffrey H., Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline, DeJong, Gordon F., and Rodríguez, Leila. 2006. “Ethnic identities, language and economic outcomes among Dominicans in a new destination.” Social Science Quarterly 87: 1088-1099.

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Sagarra, Nuria and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (eds.). 2006. Selected Proceedings of the 9th Hispanic Linguistics Symposium. Cascadilla Proceedings Project

Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2006. “Intra-system variability and change in nominal and verbal morphology.” In Historical Romance Linguistics: Retrospective and Perspectives, R. Gess and D. Arteaga (eds.),” 305-325. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2006. Review article of Contact linguistics: Bilingual encounters and grammatical outcomes, C. Myers-Scotton, Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages 21: 411-414.

Bullock, B.E., Toribio, A.J., González, V. & Dalola, A. 2006. “Language Dominance and Performance Outcomes in Bilingual Pronunciation.” In Proceedings of the 8th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition Conference, M. Grantham O’Brien, C. Shea, & J. Archibald (eds.), 9-16. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2006. “Linguistic displays of identity among Dominicans in national and diasporic settlements.” In English and Ethnicity, C. Davies and J. Brutt-Griffler (eds.). New York: Palgrave.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline and Nye, Carlos. (2006). “Restructuring of reverse psychological predicates in bilingual Spanish.” In New Perspectives in Romance Linguistics. J. Montreuil and C. Nishida (eds.), 263-277. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Zapata, Gabriela, Sánchez, Liliana, and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2005. “Contact and contracting Spanish.” International Journal of Bilingualism 3-4, 377-395.

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Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2004. “Convergence as an emergent property in bilingual speech.” Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 7, 91-93.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2004. “Convergence as an optimization strategy of bilingual speech: Evidence from code-switching. “ Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 7, 165-173.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline, Bullock, Barbara E., Botero, Christopher G. and Davis, Kristopher Allen. 2004. “Perseverative effects in bilingual code-switching.” In Experimental and Theoretical Approaches to Romance Linguistics, R. Gess and E. Rubin (eds.), 291-306. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2004. “Spanish-English speech practices: Bringing chaos to order.” International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism 7, 133-154.

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Bullock, B. E., Toribio, A. J., Davis, K. A. & Botero, C. G. 2004. “Phonetic convergence in bilingual Puerto Rican Spanish.” In WCCFL 23: Proceedings of the 23rd West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, V. Chand, A. Kelleher, A. Rodríguez, & B. Schmeiser (eds.), 113-125. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Bullock, Barbara E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline (Guest Eds.). 2004. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 7.2. Special issue: Bilingualism and linguistic convergence.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2003. “The social significance of language loyalty among Black and White Dominicans in New York.” The Bilingual Review/La Revista Bilingüe 27.1, 3-11

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2003.”Spanish-English code-switching among US Latinos.” International Journal of the Sociology of Language 158, 89-119.

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Sánchez, Liliana and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2003. “Current Issues in the Generative Study of Spanish Second Language Syntax.” In Studies in Spanish Second Language Acquisition: The State of the Science, B. Lafford and R. Salaberry (eds.), 189-232. Georgetown University Press.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2003. “Minority perspectives on language: Mexican and Mexican-American attitudes towards Spanish and English.” In Mi lengua: Spanish as a heritage language in the United States, A. Roca and C. Colombi (eds.), 154-169. Georgetown University Press.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2002. “Focus on clefts in Dominican Spanish.” In Structure, Meaning, and Acquisition in Spanish, J. Lee, K. Geeslin, and J.C. Clements (eds.), 130-146. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Hammer, Carol, Miccio, Adele and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2002. “Linguistics and speech-language pathology: Combining research efforts towards improved language interventions for bilingual children.” In Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 2000: Linguistics, language, and the professions, J. Alatis, H. Hamilton, and A.-H. Tan (eds.), 234-250. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2002. Review article of Bilingual speech: A typology of codemixing, P. Muysken. (2001), International Journal of Bilingualism, 91-94.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. “Accessing Spanish-English code-switching competence.” International Journal of Bilingualism 5, 403-436.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. “On the emergence of code-switching competence.” Bilingualism: Language and Cognition 4, 203-231.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. “Minimalist ideas on parametric variation.” In North East Linguistics Society 30, M. Hirotani, A. Coetzle, N. Hall, J.-Y. Kim (eds.), 627-638. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2001. “On Spanish language decline." In Proceedings of the 25 Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, A. H.-J. Do, L. Domínguez and A. Johansen (eds.), 768-779. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Language variation and the linguistic enactment of identity among Dominicans.” Linguistics: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Language Sciences 38, 1133-1159.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Setting parametric limits on dialectal variation in Spanish.” Lingua 110, 315-341.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Code-switching and minority language attrition.” In Spanish Applied Linguistics at the turn of the Millennium, R. Leow and C. Sanz (eds.), 174-193. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Once upon a time en un lugar muy lejano…Spanish-English code-switching patterns across narratives.” In Spanish in the United States: Linguistic Issues and Challenges, A. Roca (ed.), 184-203. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Nosotros somos dominicanos: Language and social differentiation among Dominicans.” In Spanish in the United States: Linguistic Issues and Challenges, A. Roca (ed.), 252-270. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Spanglish?! Bite your tongue! Spanish-English code-switching among Latinos.” Reflexiones 1999, R. Flores (ed.), 115-147. Austin, TX: Center for Mexican American Studies.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Book Notice of A.Y. Durgunoglu and L. Verhoeven, eds. (1998), Literacy development in a multilingual context.” Language 77, 413-414.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. Review article, Slips of the tongue: Speech errors in first and second language production, N. Poulisse (1999), Journal of Linguistics 37, 439-444.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Research directions in second language acquisition.” Review article, Handbook of second language acquisition.” W. Ritchie and T. Bhatia, eds. (1996), World Englishes 19, 251-254

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 2000. “Positional licensing of subjects.” In Proceedings of the Fifteenth Eastern States Conference on Linguistics, R. Daly and A. Riehl (eds.), 237-248. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Linguistics Circle

Gumperz, John and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1999. “Codeswitching.” In The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences, F. Keil and R. Wilson (eds.), 118-119. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Zabaleta, Francisco and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1999. “The influence of first language phonology in the development of first and second language orthography.” Tinta 3, 65-82

Rubin, Edward J. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1996. “The role of functional categories in bilingual children’s language mixing and differentiation.” World Englishes 15, 385-39.

Rubin, Edward J. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1996. “Code-switching in Generative Grammar.” In Spanish in Contact, J. Jensen and A. Roca (eds.), 203-226. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1996. “Dialectal variation in the licensing of null referential and expletive pronouns.” In Aspects of Romance Linguistics, C. Parodi, C. Quicoli, M. Saltarelli and M.L. Zubizarreta (eds.), 409-432. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

Rubin, Edward J. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1995. “Feature-checking and the syntax of language contact.” In J. Amastae, G. Goodall, M. Montalbetti and M. Phinney, eds. Contemporary Research in Romance Linguistics, 177-185. Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Brown, Barbara and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1995. “Language contact and differentiation in child bilingualism: A syntactic analysis.” In Proceedings of the 19th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development, D. MacLaughlin and S. McEwen (eds.), 629-642. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Press.

Belazi, Hedi, Rubin, Edward J. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1994. “Code-switching and X-bar Theory.” Linguistic Inquiry 25, 221-237.

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Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1994. “Review article of Lightfoot and Hornstein, eds., Verb Movement.” Journal of Linguistics 30, 356-561

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1993. “Lexical Subjects in Finite and Non-finite Clauses.” Cornell Working Papers in Linguistics 11, 149‑178.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1992. “Proper Government in Spanish Subject Relativization.” Probus 4, 291-304.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1992. “Book Notice of Grewendorf and Sternefeld, eds., Scrambling and Barriers (1990).” Language 68.3, 659-660.

Harbert, Wayne E. and Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1991. “Nominative Objects.” Cornell Working Papers in Linguistics 9, 127-191.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1990. “A-bar Movement in Spanish: Wh-questions, Focalization and Relative Clauses.” In Proceedings of the Seventh Eastern States Conference on Linguistics, Y. No and M. Libucha (eds.), 286-294. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1989. “Specifier-head Agreement in Japanese. In West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics 8, 535-548.

Toribio, Almeida Jacqueline. 1988. “Subject-Auxiliary Inversion in English: Licensing Operators.” MIT Working Papers in Linguistics 10, 240-256.

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