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Larry D. Carver, Director CLA 2.104, Mailcode G6210, Austin, TX 78712 • 512-471-3458

Course Descriptions

HMN 350 • Johnson Years

39075 • Lawrence, Mark Atwood
Meets TTH 930am-1100am LBJ 10.150
(also listed as LAH 350)
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Nearly 50 years after it ended, the presidency of Lyndon Johnson continues to inspire enormous interest and controversy. What sort of person was Johnson? What motive underpinned his greatest achievements and biggest errors in both the domestic and foreign-policy arenas? How can we reconcile the triumphs of civil rights with the setbacks of the Vietman War? What is LBJ's legacy, and what place does he deserve in the long flow of American history? These will be among the major questions at the heart of this seminar. In addressing them, we will read and discuss scholarship on the Johnson administration and the 1960s. We will also meet with various participants in - or close observers of - the Johnson administration who live in and around Austin.The central course requirement will be a research paper of approximately 25 pages based on materials in the LBJ Library archive. We will devote considerable time early in the term to identifying promising topics and learning how to use the library's reading room. Over the remainder of the term, students will be expected to conduct research and, in consultation with the instructors, produce a polished scholarly paper.

Required readings will likely include Mark K. Updegrove, Indomitable Will: LBJ in the Presidency; Maurice Isserman and Michael Kazin, American Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s; and Fredrik Logevall, Choosing War: The Lost Chance for Peace and the Escalation of War in Vietnam, as well as a packet of photocopied chapters and documents.

 

HMN 350 • Leadership And Ethics

39080 • Drumwright, Minette E
Meets TTH 200pm-330pm BMC 3.206
(also listed as LAH 350)
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Course Description:

The central purpose of the course is to examine business and the professions in the,larger context of society.  Such an examination requires consideration of a multitude of issues ranging from normative philosophical positions to practical day-to-day decision making by managers, professionals, and  leaders.  The goal is to raise important questions and issues and to help students think about how to think about them.  The course is neither a course in ethics nor a course in management per se, but it prompts students to approach the issues of business and society in a more integrative and systematic way.

The course should be of interest to a wide range of students, and it does not presume previous courses in ethics or business. 

Texts List: 

Drumwright, Business Professionals & Society  (these are cases and readings in a course packet)

Course Requirements: 

Class Participation 30% Two 8-page case write-ups

One 15 page paper (group project) (papers comprise 70% of final grade)

 

HMN 350 • Money In Amer Politics

39085 • Roberts, Brian
Meets W 330pm-630pm WAG 208
(also listed as GOV 379S, LAH 350)
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Description:

     This course explores the nature and consequences of money in American politics and why, at this point in history, we find ourselves embroiled in the most significant debate over campaign finance reform in over thirty years.   The debate goes to the heart of the U.S. Constitution, pitting the First Amendment rights of speech and assembly against the perceived fairness and efficacy of a republican government awash, some claim, in increasingly unaccountable money.

     Campaign finance issues lie at the crossroads of a bewildering number of analytical perspectives.  We (must) examine the work of historians, social scientists, legal scholars, and interested parties on all sides of the debate in an effort not only to assess current policy debates but also to understand how we got here.  During the course we confront and seek answers to a host of questions, including, but by no means limited to,

- How will corporations respond to the Supreme Court’s recent decision permitting unlimited political advertising?

- Why did most 2008 presidential candidates abandon the system of public financing for presidential elections? -Why does the public believe that corporations play such a large role in funding federal election campaigns?

-Why does the Supreme Court allow public perceptions to determine the constitutionality of campaign finance laws?

-Why do U.S. Senators refuse to report their campaign finance activity electronically to the Federal Election Commission?

-How and why is the Internet treated differently than other means of political communication by campaign finance laws?

-What are the consequences of unlimited individual contributions to state election candidates in Texas?

Texts and Works:

Corrado, Anthony, et al. The New Campaign Finance Sourcebook. 2004. Washington D.C.: Brooking Institution; Corrado, Anthony and David Magleby Financing the 2008 Election. 2010. Washington D.C.: Brooking Institution; McChesney, Fred. Money For Nothing: Politicians, Rent Extraction, and Political Extortion.  1997. Cambridge: Harvard University Press; Urofsky, Melvin., Money & Free Speech: Campaign Finance Reform and the Courts. 2005. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas Press. Other readings as assigned

Grading Policy:

     In addition to a midterm exam and meeting expectations of strong class participation, students engage in two significant projects over the course of the semester, first in the role of campaign finance consultants advising either a candidate or a political action committee, and second as members of a legal team preparing for a (marginally fictitious) Supreme Court case confronting the constitutional challenges posed by campaign finance laws.

 

 

HMN 370 • Senior Tutorial Course

39087
Meets
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A tutorial program of supervised reading and writing, including an individual paper or papers in which the student draws together the central directions and discoveries of his or her studies in the humanities. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: Consent of the humanities adviser.

HMN 379 • Conference Course

39088
Meets
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Individual instruction in a topic approved by the instructor and the humanities adviser.

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of the humanities adviser.

Hour(s) to be arranged. May be repeated for credit.

HMN 358Q • Supervised Research

39089
Meets
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Supervised Research. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: A
University grade point average of at least 3.50 and consent of the
liberal arts honors program adviser. Only one HMN 358Q may be applied towards college honors. Course may be repeated.

HMN 679HA • Honors Tutorial Course

39090
Meets
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Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.

HMN 679HB • Honors Tutorial Course

39092
Meets
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Directed reading and research, followed by the writing of a report or the creation of a project. Humanities 370 and 679HB may not both be counted.

Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Humanities Honors Program and consent of the humanities adviser; for 679HB, Humanities 679HA.

Class meets Thursdays 3-4p in PAR 214.

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