Department of Sociology

David Pedulla


Ph.D., Princeton University

Assistant Professor
David Pedulla

Contact

Biography


David Pedulla is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include race and gender stratification, labor markets, economic and organizational sociology, and experimental methods. Specifically, his research agenda examines the consequences of non-standard, contingent, and precarious employment for workers' social and economic outcomes as well as the processes leading to race and gender labor market stratification. David’s research has appeared in American Sociological ReviewAmerican Journal of SociologySocial Forces, and other academic journalsHis work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and the UC-Davis Center for Poverty Research. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University and his B.A. in History from Boston College. More information is available on his website.

Courses


SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44500 • Spring 2016
Meets TTH 1230pm-130pm CLA 0.118

Description:

How do sociologists understand and study the world around them?  This course introduces students to the ways in which social scientists pose and answer questions.   First, this course begins by considering how knowledge production is situated within a specific historical and cultural context and is shaped by power relations within society.   Some questions are simply easier—politically, logistically, legally—to ask and answer.  Other questions are difficult to broach or effectively investigate, and are sometimes fraught with ethical concerns.  We will also explore how theory is linked to empirical discovery, which in turn, tests, builds, and/or refines theoretical understandings of the social world.  Students will examine the process of social research by 1) considering the research questions that social scientists routinely ask, 2) examining the methodological approaches social scientists use to answer their research questions, 3) analyzing the claims authors make in existing research studies, and 4) investigating the ethical issues that shape the context of inquiry and the process of social research.  This course adopts a hands-on approach to research methods.  As such, students will be expected to collect and analyze data in labs as well as outside of class.

 

Readings: 

Textbook TBA, other readings to be posted to Canvas

SOC 387J • Fundamentals Of Research Meths

44730 • Fall 2015
Meets W 300pm-600pm CLA 3.106

Course Description:

 The primary goal of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the methodological tools deployed by sociologists to conduct empirically grounded and theoretically engaged research. More specifically, the objectives of this course are for students to be able to: 1) Identify and implement the key elements of a sociological study, 2) Weigh the strengths and weaknesses of different methodological approaches, and 3) Think critically about the use of empirical evidence in sociological scholarship. The course will cover the basic elements of research design, the role of theory in empirical research, the construction of sociological arguments, as well as the analysis, interpretation, and presentation of results. Methodologically inclusive, this course will introduce students to the use of ethnography, interviews, comparative/historical methods, content analysis, surveys, administrative data, and experimental and quasi-experimental techniques for causal inference. Finally, this course will address the ethical and political issues that are involved with social research.

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

44955 • Spring 2015
Meets TTH 1100am-1200pm CLA 0.118

Course Description:

How do social scientists know what they know? This course strives to address that question by introducing students to the research methods used by sociologists to understand the world around them. The following are among the topics covered in this course: 1) How to link social theory with empirical inquiry; 2) How to identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative approaches to social research; 3) How to critically understand and evaluate the claims made by social scientists about their research findings; 4) How to analyze, interpret, and present survey data; and 5) How to conceptualize and design a research project. The course will also cover the ethics and politics of conducting social research. Additionally, there will be a lab component to this course, which will take a “hands on” approach to the material covered in class and provide students with the necessary skills to analyze survey data.

Required Readings:

 

In addition to articles and readings that will be provided on the course website, we will use the following textbook:

Babbie, Earl. 2013. The Practice of Social Research (13th Edition). Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Course Grading:

 Grades for the course will be based on two exams (exam 1 = 20%, exam 2 = 20%), an analysis paper (15%), a research proposal (20%), a class presentation (5%), lab assignments (15%), and class participation (5%).

Attendance in class and at the lab is required and will be factored into the class participation component of the grade. Make-up exams will not be allowed, except in extreme circumstances. Late assignments will only be accepted if approved in advance by the professor.

 

SOC 387C • Experimental Methods In Soc

45135 • Spring 2015
Meets T 300pm-600pm CLA 3.106

Course Description:

Experiments are a powerful tool for researchers interested in causal inference. Focusing on survey- and field-experimental approaches, this course will introduce students to the logic, design, and implementation of experiments for social science research. We will begin by developing an understanding of how experimental research designs can address some of the central threats to causal identification, such as selection and omitted variables bias. Students will then engage with scholarship that has utilized experimental research designs to produce theoretical insights about topics ranging from social stratification to the dynamics of cultural markets to political mobilization. This course will also cover techniques for analyzing experimental data, strategies for dealing with noncompliance, combining experiments with other methods of inquiry, and the limitations of experiments for sociological theory development. The course will culminate with students developing an experimental research design related to their own scholarly interests. While a basic understanding of statistics is necessary for this course, the emphasis will be on research design.

Required Readings:

 

Gerber, Alan S., and Donald P. Green. 2012. Field Experiments: Design, Analysis, and Interpretation. New York: W.W. Norton.

Mutz, Diana C. 2011. Population-Based Survey Experiments. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Additional readings will be provided on the course website.

Course Grading:

Critique of experimental design paper, 3-5 pages (20% of final grade)

Analysis paper, 3-5 pages (20% of final grade)

Experimental research proposal, 5-7 pages (30% of final grade)

Presentation of research proposal (10% of final grade)

Class participation (20% of final grade)

 

SOC 317M • Intro To Social Research

46141 • Fall 2014
Meets MW 1000am-1100am CLA 1.302D

Course Description:

How do social scientists know what they know? This course strives to address that question by introducing students to the research methods used by sociologists to understand the world around them. The following are among the topics covered in this course: 1) How to link social theory with empirical inquiry; 2) How to identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative approaches to social research; 3) How to critically understand and evaluate the claims made by social scientists about their research findings; 4) How to analyze, interpret, and present survey data; and 5) How to conceptualize and design a research project. The course will also cover the ethics and politics of conducting social research. Additionally, there will be a lab component to this course, which will take a “hands on” approach to the material covered in class and provide students with the necessary skills to analyze survey data.

Required Readings:

In addition to articles and readings that will be provided on the course website, we will use the following textbook:

Babbie, Earl. 2013. The Practice of Social Research (13th Edition). Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Course Grading:

Grades for the course will be based on two exams (exam 1 = 20%, exam 2 = 20%), an analysis paper (15%), a research proposal (20%), a class presentation (5%), lab assignments (15%), and class participation (5%).

Attendance in class and at the lab is required and will be factored into the class participation component of the grade. Make-up exams will not be allowed, except in extreme circumstances. Late assignments will only be accepted if approved in advance by the professor.

Articles & Chapters


Pedulla, David S. Forthcoming. "Penalized or Protected? Gender and the Consequences of Non-Standard and Mismatched Employment Histories." American Sociological Review.


Pedulla, David S., and Sarah Thebaud (equal authorship). 2015. "Can We Finish the Revolution? Gender, Work-Family Ideals, and Institutional Constraint." American Sociological Review 80(1):116-139.


Pager, Devah, and David S. Pedulla. 2015. "Race, Self-Selection, and the Job Search Process." American Journal of Sociology 120(4):1005-1054. [Lead Article]


Pedulla, David S. 2014. “The Positive Consequences of Negative Stereotypes: Race, Sexual Orientation, and the Job Application Process.” Social Psychology Quarterly 77(1):75-94.


Owens, Lindsay A., and David S. Pedulla (equal authorship). 2014. "Material Welfare and Changing Political Preferences: The Case of Support for Redistributive Social Policies." Social Forces 92(3):1087-1113.


Pedulla, David S. 2013. "The Hidden Costs of Contingency: Employers' Use of Contingent Workers and Standard Employees' Outcomes." Social Forces 92(2):691-722.


Pedulla, David S. 2012. "To Be Young and Unemployed." New Labor Forum 21(3):26-36.


Pedulla, David S., and Katherine S. Newman. 2011. "The Family and Community Impacts of Underemployment." In Underemployment: Psychological, Economic, and Social Challenges, ed. Douglas C. Maynard and Daniel C. Feldman. New York: Springer.


O'Brien, Rourke, and David S. Pedulla (equal authorship). 2010. "Beyond The Poverty Line." Stanford Social Innovation Review 8(4):30-35.


Pager, Devah, Bruce Western, and David S. Pedulla. 2009. "Employment Discrimination and the Changing Landscape of Low-Wage Labor Markets." The University of Chicago Legal Forum 317-345.

 

News


Millennial Men Aren’t the Dads They Thought They’d Be
NY Times, July 30, 2015

Men and Women Want Egalitarian Relationships
Chicago Tribune, Janurary 20, 2015

Young Women And Men Seek More Equal Roles At Work And Home
NPR, January 23, 2015

Men And Women Prefer Egalitarian Relationships -- If Workplace Policies Support Them
Huffington Post, January 23, 2015

Millennial Dads Want It All, but Struggle to Balance Work and Home
Today, July 31, 2015

Curriculum Vitae


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  • Department of Sociology

    The University of Texas at Austin
    305 E 23rd St, A1700
    CLA 3.306
    Austin, TX 78712-1086
    512-232-6300